Education

http://worldviewmission.nl/?page_id=2769

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Sign this to support President Obama’s Student Aid Bill of Rights:

 

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Condoleezza Rice Pics

 

2015 Pathfinder Awards – Dr. Condoleezza Rice

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGqnhzU0Lmk

Condoleezza Rice: Why Democracy Matters

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqVHmderFvA

Amazing Grace – Condoleezza Rice & Jenny Oaks Baker

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hFO6EcC0ls
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=condoleezza+rice+2015
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“Experts: Education Crucial for Success of Paris Agreement, Ahmedabad Framework for Action Adopted.
UN & ACE Logo
Subject: “Experts: Education Crucial for Success of Paris Agreement, Ahmedabad Framework for Action Adopted.
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016
From: Adriana Valenzuela Jimenez <AValenzuelaJimenez@unfccc.int>
Dear colleagues,
I would like to congratulate everyone for the successful conference in Ahmedabad, India.
Special thanks to CEE and the government of India for organizing it. I am inspired by the speakers invited and the good practices presented!!!
Definitively the best investment for a sustainable development is to invest in education!!!!
Please note we have published an article on the UNFCCC Newsroom entitled “Experts: Education Crucial for Success of Paris Agreement, Ahmedabad Framework for Action Adopted. The article is available on the links below.

English: Experts: Education Crucial for Success of Paris Agreement
Ahmedabad Framework for Action Adopted

French: L’éducation est cruciale pour le succès de l’Accord de Paris
Cadre d’action d’Ahmedabad adopté

We look forward to continue working with you!

Warm regards,
 
Adriana Valenzuela (Ms.)
Focal Point – Education, Training and Public Awareness
Action for Climate Empowerment (ACE)
Communications and Outreach Programme
Platz der Vereinten Nationen 1, 53113 Bonn, Germany
Tel.: +49 228 815 1594   Fax: + 49 228 815 1999
avalenzuelajimenez@unfccc.int   http://unfccc.int
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Learnings – Climate Change Notes — SDGs
Dear Friends,

 
Some of you  may be familiar with these understandings, others unfamiliar.  For Your Information… “How Agriculture Changes Our Climate” this information below provides an excellent summary of contributions to GHG via agriculture. 

 Ciao/kathy

Filed under: Agriculture,  Article,  Climate Change,   Communications,   CRP7 Tagged: Greenhouse gas emissions,  University of Minnesoate Institute on the Environment 

 
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Living on Earth — Rachel Kyte [the most important work at COP21 may have happened out of the spotlight]

Dear Friends and Colleagues,
Environmental Education as part of the multi-dimensions of working towards sustainability can be seen at the implementation, engaging stakeholders level.  Here is Rachel Kyte, UN Chief Executive Officer of the Sustainable Energy for All (SE4All) initiative :
“Across a spectrum of issues, often outside of the convention, remarkable working coalitions have now formed and are making very substantial pledges,” explains Rachel Kyte, the World Bank’s special envoy for climate change. These “coalitions of the working, …”
Taken from an interview on “living on earth” [http://loe.org/index.html].
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UNSD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators with Climate Change Team
__________________
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell: +1-(734) 352•7429
Landline: +1-(734) 994•3612
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The interactive version of the Bali Guideline Implementation Guide – Environmental Education
Dear Friends and Colleagues,

Rio Principle 10 is an outgrowth of the policy directive found in Agenda 21, Chapter 36.1.  In 2010  UNEP Governing Council adopted the Bali guidelines as a tool to assist countries in fillin gaps in national and sub-national legislation in order to facilitate broad access to information, public participation and access to justice in environmental matters.
“In 2012 UNEP and UNITAR joined hands to promote the Bali Guidelines, including through a project to develop a Guide to the Guidelines implemented by the World Resource Institute (WRI). Drafted with assistance from a global Advisory Group, the Guide is intended to be a practical tool for the use of governments, major groups and stakeholders, legal professionals, implementing authorities and others engaged in the application of Rio Principle 10. It includes a full range of actual examples of implementation of national law and practice to support policy makers, legislators and public authorities in their daily work of applying the Bali Guidelines for the Development of National Legislation on Access to Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matter, realizing the provisions of Principle 10 in practice. It can be used to assist states in undertaking their own gap analysis of national legislation. It takes into account the range of diversity of systems of law throughout the world and aims to fit this diversity.”
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UNSD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
 __________________
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell:  1-734-352-7429
Land line: +1 (734) 994-3612
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Rio Principle 10 and the Bali Guidelines

Principle 10 was adopted 1992 as a part of the Rio Declaration, stating that:

“Environmental issues are best handled with participation of all concerned citizens, at the relevant level. At the national level, each individual shall have appropriate access to information concerning the environment that is held by public authorities, including information on hazardous materials and activities in their communities, and the opportunity to participate in decision-making processes. States shall facilitate and encourage public awareness and participation by making information widely available. Effective access to judicial and administrative proceedings, including redress and remedy, shall be provided. “

Principle 10 sets out three fundamental rights: access to information, access to public participation and access to justice, as key pillars of sound environmental governance. The “access rights” have emerged to be very important in promoting transparent, inclusive and accountable environmental governance. Access to information empowers citizens and incentivizes them to participate in decision and policy making processes in an informed manner. Public participation is increasingly being seen as a vital part of addressing environmental problems and achieving sustainable development by encouraging governments to adopt policies and enact laws that take community needs into account. Access to justice provides the foundation of the “access rights”, as it facilitates the public’s ability to enforce their right to participate, to be informed, and to hold regulators and polluters accountable for environmental harm (Benson Ochieng, Implementing Principle 10 and the Bali Guidelines in Africa, UNEP, February 2015).

The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development from 2012 (Rio + 20) has re-confirmed Principle 10, in its outcome document, “The Future We Want”, also underlining its importance at the regional level. See the Report of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, 2012, here:

In order to catalyze and to accelerate action in terms of implementing Principle 10, governments adopted the Guidelines for the Development of National Legislation on Access to Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters (Bali Guidelines) at the 11th Special Session of UNEP’s Governing Council/ Global Ministerial Environmental Forum in Bali, Indonesia, in 2010.

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Rio – New Museum of Tomorrow — Environmental Education & Engaging the Public

Rio´s MuseumExciting new museum in Brazil

Rio de Janeiro’s Museum of Tomorrow is lauded for its green architecture, the focus of the museum ranges from humanity’s role in climate change to the cosmic
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HLPF: SDGs Learning, Training and Practice 2016 (Deadline for course proposals: 20 May)
We will compile a list to submit, quick turn around  here so send your suggestions by Thursday.  Thanks, Pam and Brem

TO UN DESA NGO MAJOR GROUP & OTHER STAKEHOLDERS — FYI
From: Isabela Cunha <cunhai@un.org>
Date: Tue, May 17, 2016
Subject: HLPF: SDGs Learning, Training and Practice 2016 (Deadline for course proposals: 20 May)
To:

Dear all,

To effectively begin the implementation of Agenda 2030, access to knowledge and information will be essential for policy makers and community leaders to design well-informed and effective policies and strategies.Profiting from the presence of a broad range of participants attending the HLPF, the Division for Sustainable Development in the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) are co-organizing the SDGs Learning, Training and Practice sessions – a capacity building, networking and experience-sharing event, with high-level speakers and experts on crucial topics related to the implementation of Agenda 2030 and the SDGs.

The SDGs Learning, Training and Practice sessions, which will take place from 11 to 15 July 2016, will focus on sessions supporting the HLPF theme: “Ensuring that no one is left behind”. It will aim to provide a strategic vision and practical knowledge to participants on how to find effective sustainable solutions for their community, be it a country, city, village or neighbourhood.

The SDGs Learning, Training and Practice sessions will aim to advance:

  • Knowledge and skills acquisition
  • Networking
  • Sharing experiences and peer to peer collaboration
  • Learning about practical actions and best practices
  • Capacity building
  • Practical policy integration and coherence

We cordially inviting Member States, the UN system, Major Groups and other Stakeholders to send your course proposals to offer capacity building opportunities during the HLPF.

Deadline for applications: 20 May 2016 
More information available at: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/hlpf/SDGsLearning

SGD Learning
Isabela Cunha | Stakeholder Engagement Programme 
Division for Sustainable Development | DESA
 
United Nations | Room S-2670 

Email: cunhai@un.org | Ext: 147723
sustainabledevelopment.un.org 
Sustainable Dev Goal Logo
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Education at a Glance 2015: Look and learn!

 C(UK), DQMC(UK), MAS(UK)

email :- (personal ) nfqadir@yahoo.com ; nfqadir@gmail.com
cellular UAE+ 971 50 6534979 ; https://ae.linkedin.com/in/nfqadir
“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world: Indeed it’s the only thing that ever has.”
- Margaret Mead
Benjamin Franklin said, “If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail,”Please Think B4U Print
1 ream of paper = 6% of a tree and 5.4 kg CO2 in the atmosphere
3 sheets of A4 paper pollutes 1 litre of water’SAVE WATER J  ~  SAVE ENERGY~ ~ SAVE EARTH
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North America on COOL – Education Implications

Canada Gov

STATEMENT- Canada and Mexico Issue Statment on U.S. Country of Origin Labelling
17 December 2015
Ottawa, Canada - The Honourable Chrystia Freeland, Cabnada’s Minister of International Trade, and Ildefonso Guajardo Villarreal, Mexico’s Secretary of Economy, jointly issued the following statement on the margins of the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) Ministerial Conference in Nairobi, Kenya, on the United States’ Country of Origin Labelling (COOL) requirements:“Yesterday, we met to discuss our shared commitment to North American prosperity and how the WTO can further contribute to global development.“We are reminded this week of the importance of a rules-based multilateral trading system and the role the WTO plays in ensuring all members play by the rules. The WTO’s ruling on U.S. COOL reaffirms the effectiveness of the dispute settlement mechanism.“Canada and Mexico are also closely following recent and positive developments in the U.S. Congress to repeal COOL for beef and pork.“COOL harms both Canadian and Mexican livestock producers. The governments of Canada and Mexico are working together on a coordinated approach to defend the interests of our livestock industry.“If the COOL repeal is not signed into law, Canada and Mexico are prepared to quickly exercise their retaliatory rights.”

Contacts

Christine Constantin
Spokesperson
Embassy of Canada, Washington D.C.
202-682-7715
Christine.Constantin@international.gc.ca

Media Relations Office
Global Affairs Canada
343-203-7700
Media@international.gc.ca

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Preparing for COP 19 – Insights from H.E. Mr. Luis-Alfonso de Alba (Mexico)

Dear Community of Educators,

 
The Global Foundation for Democracy and Development [fostering progress, collaboration and exchange] (GGDD) has placed the spotlight on Latin American UN Ambassadors:Mexican Ambassador discusses the Country’s Critical Role in UN Processes, Climate Change Issues, and Financing for Development, visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8DpJ-b8Y20&feature=youtu.be  The reference to the Cancun meeting is the Climate Change COP held in Cancun, which set many new precedents regarding equity and participation.

Ambassador Luis-Alfonso de Alba gives an excellent overview of the processes in play.  If  you ever wonder what is going on, this is a good understanding of the global framework for the UN and the implications for governments at all levels, to share with your colleagues and networks.
 
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change with Tiahoga Ruge, Jim Taylor, Tich Pesanayi, and Kavita Myles
__________________
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell:  (734) 330-0238
Voice/Fax: (734) 994-3612
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GOOD NEWS! US Congress Appropriations – Education Program “Every Student Suceeds Act” Billion $$$ Support – Environmental Education — CC History in Paris/EE History in DC
PastedGraphic-2
Dear Friends and Colleagues,

A moment to celebrate.  In Paris at COP21, two days left, our UNSD Climate Change delegation is working hard contributing to the final outcome document.  In Washington DC, support for mainstreaming environmental education has moved passed nominal Federal $$$ support to B, yes Billions of $$$ in terms of the “Every Child Succeeds Act”, k-12 education with key provisions for EE.  President Obama will sign the law within the next 10 days.
  Please share widely with your colleagues and networks, your newsletters and radio programs,.
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UNSD Education Caucus Coi-Chairs
Co-coordinators Climate Change Team
From: Don Baugh <captbaugh@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, Dec 9, 2015
Subject: News Flash: Pop the Champagne—Historic Win for Environmental Education
To: Don Baugh <captbaugh@gmail.com>

Today, environmental education made historic strides. In a bi-partisan vote the US Senate passed the Every Student Succeeds Act, including key provisions for environmental education.  A companion bill passed the House last week.  The act, a new rendering of the No Child Left Behind Act, is federal funding bill for K-12 schools.  We were able to turn lemons to lemonade. The President has signalled he will sign, which by law will be within 10 days.

Thank you for your support!

Here is what we won:

  • $1.6B “well-rounded education” grants program including environmental education
  • $1B after school grants programs including environmental literacy
  • STEM funding including “hands-on learning” and “field-based or service learning”

What it means:

  • Environmental education has become an expected component of a student’s education.
  • Students across the  nation will be engaged in outdoor learning and in action projects
  • Federal funds will go to partnership programs between school systems and

o   Environmental education providers,

o   conservation organizations,

o   higher learning institutions,

o   community-based organizations,

o   businesses,

o   parks,

o   other government agencies

Whom to thank:

  • Senator Reed and Congress Sarbanes—our champions, who made this happen
  • No Child Left Inside Coalition—the 2,250 organizations, representing 50 million people, and led by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, worked tirelessly to advocate, advised by Charlie Stek, Jeri Thomson, Gary Heath, Sarah Bodor, Monica Healy, and Kevin Sullivan
  • NAAEE’s Advocacy Committee—led by Linda Rhoades, Shareen Knowlton, Traci Price, and Brock Adler
  • National Wildlife Federation—Kevin Coyle and Patrick Fitzgerald were heavy weights throughout the fight
  • American Zoos and Aquariums, National Recreation and Parks Association, Campaign for Environmental Literacy, American Camp Association, Project Learning Tree, Earth Day Network, Wildlife Conservation Society, Sierra Club, Wilderness—these groups lent incredible staff resources for years

Eight years.  2,250 organizations.  It was a long and winding road with an uncertain ending, but we built the critical steps along the way that led to final inclusion of key components of the No Child Left Inside language.

JOY!

Now the fun begins—launching programs to surf this magic moment. I know at my new environmental leadership nonprofit, UpstreamAlliance, this great victory will allow our programs and partnerships to make one giant leap forward.

This is really good news! We all need a bit of GOOD news! Thanks, Pam, for sharing it!

Best wishes,
Suzana
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YUNGA ALERT :: Education at COP21 – Ministerial event in streaming this Friday + Manifesto

This may be of interest to those of you working in the formal education arena.

 Dr. P. J. Puntenney

Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell:  1-734-352-7429

  YUNGA ALERT :: Education at COP21 – Ministerial event in streaming this Friday + Manifesto

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Michael Boampong <michael@ypwc.org>
Date: 3 December 2015
Subject: Fwd: YUNGA ALERT :: Education at COP21 – Ministerial event in streaming this Friday + Manifesto
To: michael boampong <mboampong@gmail.com>

YUNGA <YUNGA@fao.org>
Date: 3 December 2015
Subject: YUNGA ALERT :: Education at COP21 – Ministerial event in streaming this Friday + Manifesto
To: YUNGA-L@listserv.fao.org

FAO :: ALERT :: YUNGA :: ALERT :: FAO :: ALERT :: YUNGA :: ALERT

EDUCATION AT COP21!

Ministerial event in streaming this Friday + Manifesto

Find out about some great advancements towards integrating education in the international response to climate change!

The Meeting of Education ministers organized by France at the COP21 will take place Friday, December 4. The Conference theme is: Good practices in education for sustainable development: how to drive change to educate the challenges of climate change? You can follow this event live, in streaming, in English/French, this Friday 4th December from 10h45 to 13h Paris time, through www.education.gouv.fr and www.cop21.gouv.fr. (Find the Agenda of the event attached – French version).

Moreover, a Manifesto -“Ten billion human beings: to live with each other, let’s change education! – a Manifesto for global citizenship education”- has been written for the occasion by the “Paris Education Collective 2015″. The Collective brought together educationalists, organizational leaders and politicians who worked for the integration of education into the Paris Climate Conference 2015 (COP21).

(French version available at http://paris-education2015.org/)
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Enjoy it, share it, get involved!

The YUNGA team

Kind Regards,

Michael Boampong,

Young People We Care (YPWC) | Founder,Board Member & Principal Advisor
Phone #: +233-242970908 (Ghana) ; +46-764373756 (Sweden) ;+1-774-386-2018 (USA)

Skype:mikenice22002
www.michaelboampong.com
www.opportunitiesforyouth.org
www.ypwc.orgYoung People We Care (YPWC) is a registered youth-led and youth-focused, non-profit organization that is headquartered in Ghana. The organization is operated by young people (ages 15–30) and adult allies working on youth and development related issues worldwide. At YPWC, we are passionate about sustainable development, the realization of the Millennium Development Goals and the promotion of a culture of peace and universal human rights for all. Visit us at: www.ypwc.org

déroulé thematic day

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Education project: Santa Claus Takes on Climate Change Comic Book

Dear Friends,
As governments are meeting in Paris for the Climate Summit I am writing to ask you to support an educational comic  project ‘Santa Claus Takes on Climate Change’. Utilizing Santa Claus we hope that the issue will be better understood by the next generation.
Climate change is as you know possibly the most critical issue facing this and the next generations.
So if you are interested in supporting an education project on climate change, THIS project is for you!
What We Need 
The objective is to help the next generation understand climate change. We will create a free downloadable comic as part of the Comics Uniting Nations initiative.
Comics Uniting Nations is a monumental partnership between a group of innovative nonprofits, working in close coordination with the United Nations Millennium Campaign and the United Nations Post-2015 Development Planning Team to make the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) accessible to the citizens of the world through comics. One of the SDGs is on climate change.
This Indiegogo project is supporting the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals in particular this comic is focused on Santa Claus taking on Climate Change. It is based on a story that was written for the BBC in 2009.
The first Uniting Nations Comic ‘Chakra the Invincible’ was created by the great Stan Lee, Shared Devarajan and Gotham Chopra and can be read here.
This comic will be written by Felix Dodds and Michael Strauss, and the art by UK Marvel and 2000 AD comic artist John Charles.
We need to raise $30,000 to get this comic produced. The expenses are largely for the cost of hiring an artist, letterer, colorist, editor and final story writer to produce the comic and the expenses associated with putting the comic into digital format.
We will launch the comic at a major United Nations climate event in the next year. I hope you can support this important project.
Warmest regards

Felix Dodds: US mobile +13472073919  www.felixdodds.net

Senior Fellow at the Global Research Institute University of North Carolina and Associate Fellow at the Tellus Institute Boston
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Knowledge Systems – Understanding Education

Dear Colleagues,

I just thought of sharing with you this photo.  The terminology (education) seems to weaken its true aspirations and this is something that needs careful thought.
Meg
Meg
The actual quote from Einstein, which was made in response to Thomas Edison’ dimissing college education, is the following:

“It is not so very important for a person to learn facts. For that he does not really need a college. He can learn them from books.  The value of an education in a liberal arts college is not the learning of many facts, but the training of the mind to think something that cannot be learned from textbooks.”
M
The creative works sublime success,
Furthering through perseverance.
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Building a Sustainable Present: Event Recording Available

News & Updates from the Peace Education Initiative
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The innovation imperative and the design of learning systems

 

The innovation imperative and the design of learning systems

Schooling-redesigned

David Istance, Senior Analyst, OECD Directorate for Education and Skills

Education has become increasingly important worldwide, including politically. Probably the key driver for this is economic – the fundamental role of knowledge and skills in underpinning and maintaining prosperity. No argument has more political purchase today regarding education’s value than that it enhances competitiveness. These developments create an appetite for reform and innovation, often manifest as favouring “learning” over “education”, and a readiness to disrupt accepted institutional arrangements as too slow to change, too inward-looking, and too detached from the economic shifts taking place globally and locally.

This represents a very different starting point for innovation compared with the longstanding educational ambition to realise more holistic opportunities and promote individual development. From this perspective, the problem is not that the institutions of education are too detached from the economy, but that they are too close, and are pulled to narrow their curricula and instil only superficial knowledge and not deep understanding. The charge is also that education systems are profoundly inequitable, too driven by sorting and selecting and not organised for the optimisation of learning.

There is another constituency with an interest in innovation. Innovating learning environments offer a far more promising route for enhancing the attractiveness of teaching than backward-looking definitions of professionalism seen as the right of the individual teacher to be left undisturbed in his or her own classroom.

The differences of the critiques and constituencies notwithstanding, they coalesce around the urgent need to innovate the fundamentals of schooling: to address the low visibility of teacher work and their isolation in highly fragmented classroom arrangements, the low engagement of too many of the main players (especially students), conformity and highly unequal learning outcomes.

Some 26 school systems (countries, regions, networks) participated in the final part of the OECD Innovative Learning Environments project by submitting their own initiatives for innovating learning beyond single schools or organisations. The synthesis report that emerged from this project, Schooling Redesigned: Towards Innovative Learning Systems, is published today.

The report summarises the strategies that lead to innovation as a series of Cs: culture change; clarifying focus; creating professional capacity; collaboration and co-operation; communication technologies and platforms; and change agents .

The book emphasises the importance of design, and for that read “leadership”. In complex school systems, leadership can include many more actors – such as community players, families and foundations – besides those usually involved in designing curricula and classrooms. Government leadership remains fundamental, however, because of its legitimacy, breadth and capacity to unlock resources. Governments have a privileged role in starting and sustaining change, and in regulating, incentivising and accelerating it. But this does not have to mean “micro-managing”.

For example, New Zealand’s “Learning and Change Networks” is a government-initiated strategy to establish a web of knowledge-sharing networks among schools, families, teachers, leaders, communities, professional providers and the Ministry of Education. Network participants work collaboratively to accelerate student achievement in grades 1 to 8 and address equity issues.

Austria’s “New Secondary School” reform was initiated by the government in 2008 and has since been mandated to be phased in completely by 2018. It is introduced in individual schools through school-based change agents (Lerndesigners) who themselves work collaboratively as networks. The recently established National Center for Learning Schools provides materials and organisation for these change agents.

The report elaborates what an innovative learning environment would look like, not just in individual schools but across a whole system. For example, schools and classrooms would be characterised by the “buzz” of collegial activity and have many students learning outside conventional classrooms; learner voice would be prominent, including in leadership, right across school systems; educators would discuss and practice learning strategies collaboratively, and personalise these strategies for individual learners; learners and educators would use digital resources and social media innovatively for teaching, learning and professional exchanges; there would be a dominant practice of self-review and use of evidence to inform design; and there would be dense networks of collaboration across districts, networks, chains and communities of practice.

How interesting it would be to be able to measure progress towards this vision, to supplement the more conventional education statistics and indicators!

Useful links

Critical Maths for Innovative Societies – The Role of Metacognitive Pedagogies

Guest author | October 22, 2015 | Tags: educationinnovation | Categories: Insights | URL: http://wp.me/p2v6oD-2gY

With best wishes,

Dr. Noman Fazal Qadir
PhD(UK), MSc(UK), BSc, DIC(UK), DQMC(UK), MAS(UK)
email :- (personal ) nfqadir@yahoo.com ; nfqadir@gmail.com
cellular UAE+ 971 50 6534979 ; https://ae.linkedin.com/in/nfqadir
“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world: Indeed it’s the only thing that ever has.”
- Margaret Mead

Benjamin Franklin said, “If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail,”Please Think B4U Print
1 ream of paper = 6% of a tree and 5.4 kg CO2 in the atmosphere
3 sheets of A4 paper pollutes 1 litre of water’SAVE WATER J  ~  SAVE ENERGY~ ~ SAVE EARTH
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CFP: Envisioning Futures for Environmental and Sustainability Education

FGCU Center <futuresbook2015@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, Oct 16, 2015
Subject: Fwd: CFP: Envisioning Futures for Environmental and Sustainability Education
To: Sustainable Development Announcement List <sdg@lists.iisd.ca>

Dear Colleagues,
Attached please find a CFP for a new edited collection project. Please feel free to distributed to interested parties.
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This edited collection invites educational practitioners and theorists to speculate on – and craft visions for – the future of environmental and sustainability education. We wish to explore what educational methods and practices might exist on the horizon, waiting for discovery and implementation. How might the collective project of imagining alternative futures help us rethink environmental and sustainability education institutionally, intellectually, and pedagogically? How might we use emerging modes of critical speculation as a means to map and (re)design the future of environmental and sustainability education today?
The future of environmental education is an urgent question in the larger context of the Anthropocene, the geological epoch in which human activities have become the dominant driver in the ongoing evolution of Earth’s biosphere. Our contemporary ecological moment is characterized by complexity, uncertainty, and “accelerating change” (Wals and Corcoran 2012). While the global impact of anthropogenic climate change is undeniable, the pace of temperature and sea-level rise depends on ecological feedback loops that are not fully understood – and which may be increasing the rate of biosphere destabilization (Hansen et al. 2015). From a social perspective, the Anthropocene is an age of what humanities scholar Rob Nixon (2011) terms “slow violence,” or ecological violence and environmental injustice that occurs on spatial and temporal scales that are hard to understand or represent, most often against the world’s poorest peoples. In light of such developments, educators need strategies for anticipatory engagement with changing socio-ecological realities – both in the present and future – in order to be effective within their various embodied contexts. This volume explores how environmental educators can engage in imaginative mapping concerning large scale, global processes, as well as create useful, situated knowledge for dissemination within their respective socio-ecological contexts.
We seek contributions that leverage speculative inquiry to imagine how nascent scientific, technological, social, and ecological developments might perturb, disrupt, and/or transform the field of environmental education. Likewise, we also seek contributions that mobilize such thinking to extend earlier lines of related inquiry within the field, such as “backcasting” (Holmberg 2000), or that chart points of contact between emerging modes of speculative thought and the field’s own longstanding concern with ecological futurity. In asking these questions we are inspired by thinkers within fields such as design, architecture, and computer science. These disciplines have recently initiated discussions concerning how critical speculation might help practitioners challenge ingrained disciplinary assumptions. For example, speculative design (Dunne and Raby 2013), architecture fiction (Gadanho 2009; Lally 2014), and science fiction prototyping (Johnson 2011) harness science fiction’s capacity to explore possible futures through extrapolating elements of our contemporary moment into imaginary worlds.
Previous volumes within this United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (UNDESD) series have responded to the complexity of environmental education in our contemporary moment with concepts such as social learning, intergenerational learning, and transformative leadership for sustainable futures. Envisioning Futures for Environmental and Sustainability Education builds on this earlier work – as well as the work of others. It seeks to foster modes of intellectual engagement with ecological futures in the Anthropocene; to develop resilient, adaptable pedagogies as a hedge against future ecological uncertainties; and to spark discussion concerning how futures thinking can generate theoretical and applied innovations within the field.
You can view the full CFP at:
Abstract submission instructions
In order for your chapter to be considered, please submit an abstract to futuresbook2015@gmail.com no later than November 13 2015. Abstracts should be approximately 300 words. Please include 2-5 key references in your abstract; these will not count towards your word limit. Please identify the part of the book in which you’d like your chapter to be considered. Also include a short professional biography for all co-authors.
Best,
Joseph P. Weakland, Ph.D.
Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow
   Georgia Institute of Technology
Editorial Associate, Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education
   Florida Gulf Coast University
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Open Letter to COP 21: Global Alliance of Higher Education Institutions

You may want to participate in this effort–TODAY:
     http://cop21.grli.org

Thank you for signing the Open Letter to COP21 Ministers and Governments. Your endorsement strengthens the voice of the world’s students and tertiary and higher education institutions. Please help us spread the word about this Open Letter by forwarding below text to your contacts and by sharing this on social media via your institutional Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn channels. This initiative is coordinated on behalf of a global alliance by:

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Dear Colleagues, The collective voice of the world’s universities, colleges and students needs to be heard at COP21 when the United Nations Climate Change Conference takes place in Paris, France during the first week of December. Earlier today I signed, on behalf of <<Network / Association / University / College>> this open letter to COP21 Ministers and Governments and would like to encourage you to the same on behalf of your respective organisations. The Open Letter urges COP21 delegates to celebrate and confirm the critical role universities and colleges play in finding and implementing solutions towards climate change mitigation and adaptation, placing it in the context of addressing wider issues of sustainability, including social and economic policies and practices. Addressed to COP21 Ministers and Governments the letter also calls for more specific measures to be taken such as showcasing universities and colleges as living laboratories for climate change adaptation and mitigation, increasing support for trans-disciplinary learning, teaching and research approaches, and using university and college campuses and operations as a leverage agent to accelerate the transition to clean energy sources. Please add your voice to this growing global alliance of tertiary and higher education sustainability and student networks and associations by getting your most senior representative to co-sign the letter before 14 October.

-- 
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  Ashwani
     Vasishth         vasishth@ramapo.edu          (201) 684-6616
                http://phobos.ramapo.edu/~vasishth
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          Associate Professor of Environmental Planning
         Director, Master of Arts In Sustainability Studies
                 http://ramapo.edu/sustainability

                     Ramapo College of New Jersey
           505 Ramapo Valley Road, SSHS, Mahwah, NJ 07430
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New partnerships offer much needed support to education for all [EFA]

New partnerships offer much needed support to education for all

    
Today’s post, by Qian Tang, UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Education, is one in a series of ‘In my view’ pieces written by prominent authors on issues covered in the “Development Co-operation Report 2015: Making Partnerships Effective Coalitions for Action”External support continues to play an important role in funding education – particularly in the least developed countries. In the aftermath of the global financial crisis, with the development assistance provided by many countries stagnating and even declining, countries are seeking new sources of funding.In this context, UNESCO has been experimenting with a novel type of partnership that is showing promise. The four-year UNESCO-China Funds-in-Trust project, which began in 2012, aims to support eight African countries* in their efforts to accelerate progress towards education for all by using new technologies to develop capacity in teacher education and training institutions.What makes this project particularly innovative is the fact that it is being implemented through a platform, managed by UNESCO, that attracts funds not only from the government of the People’s Republic of China – with President Xi Jinping having publicly committed to the project – but also from Chinese enterprises based in China and/or in the beneficiary countries, such as the telecommunications giant Huawei. Each actor brings unique contributions – be they funds and/or technical know-how – to the table. Drawing on the competencies of each partner allows for effective use of human and financial resources.What have we seen so far? For the beneficiary countries, learning from the development experience of another country has created a sense of joint purpose and helped overcome the mistrust between governments and the private sector that can sometimes impede action.There have also been numerous benefits for China. This is the first time that the country has provided funds-in-trust via an international organisation for the development of education in Africa. The project has enabled China to demonstrate that it is a committed stakeholder in the global community. At the same time, it is allowing this new provider of development co-operation to become familiar with international practices and standards. The impact on Chinese enterprises is also important, helping them to gain awareness of their social responsibility towards the African communities in which they operate.Of course, challenges remain. In order to ensure lasting impact, it will be important to integrate the project within national education development plans – an aspect that has not yet been sufficiently addressed.

For now, UNESCO is working to sustain the momentum of this new partnership and extend its reach. Building on the initial success, a number of additional Chinese donors from the public and private sectors have signed agreements with UNESCO: for example, Hainan Airlines and the Hainan Foundation are focusing their attention on girls’ and women’s education in Asia and Africa; the Shenzhen government is developing higher education in Asia and Africa; and Huawei is using new technologies to promote equity and quality in education in the least developed countries.

*The African countries supported by the UNESCO-China Funds-in-Trust project are: Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia and Namibia (first round); and the Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Tanzania and Uganda (added in the second round).

Useful links

Development Co-operation Report 2015: Making Partnerships Effective Coalitions for Action

 Guest author | August 26, 2015 at 9:03 am | Categories: DevelopmentInsights | URL: http://wp.me/p2v6oD-2bZ

With best wishes,Dr. Noman Fazal Qadir
PhD(UK), MSc(UK), BSc, DIC(UK), DQMC(UK), MAS(UK)
email :- (personal ) nfqadir@yahoo.com ; nfqadir@gmail.com
cellular UAE+ 971 50 6534979 ;


“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world: Indeed it’s the only thing that ever has.”
- Margaret MeadPlease Think B4U Print
1 ream of paper = 6% of a tree and 5.4 kg CO2 in the atmosphere
3 sheets of A4 paper pollutes 1 litre of water’SAVE WATER J  ~  SAVE ENERGY~ ~ SAVE EARTHNew partnerships offer much needed support to education for all

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Education – Schooling

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Post-2015 indicators consultations now open

We are now reaching the final stages of the SDGs and Education 2030 processes, and it is vital for civil society to maintain the pressure now to ensure the agendas we have already fought hard for can truly come to fruition. Currently there are two crucial consultations in which we are asking GCE members to take part. These concern the process of development of the indicators, which will become the backbone of the monitoring and accountability system for the new education targets. In order to support GCE members to get involved, we are providing resources to help you to inform and submit your contributions.

Key documents (attached):

  • Proposed GLOBAL Indicators
  • Proposed THEMATIC Indicators
  • Education 2030 Indicators: Members’ Briefing
  • TAG consultation document
  • Priority countries – based on memberships of relevant bodies

Global indicators consultation

The first consultation concerns the global indicators, and is being led by the UN-established Interagency Expert Group for SDG Indicators (IAEG-SDG). The global indicators run across the SDGs, and are focused on a limited number of ‘global priorities’. GCE, in collaboration with Education International, has analysed the proposed indicators, and together we have proposed a series of amended or new indicators based on our existing positions regarding the education targets. The attached document, Proposed GLOBAL Indicators, details the existing proposals (the first two columns) and the GCE/EI analysis and recommendations (last two columns).

This consultation is available online here, and closes on 7th September. Unfortunately, this consultation is only available in English; however, for those who are members of regional organisations, it may be possible to make your comments to them in advance of the deadline, and for your comments to be incorporated into their submissions. GCE is providing its commentary and accompanying briefing in all GCE languages in order to support you.

Thematic indicators consultation

The Technical Advisory Group (TAG) has been developing thematic indicators for the EFA process under the overall guidance of the EFA Steering Committee. The attached document, ProposedTHEMATIC Indicators, provides GCE’s commentary, analysis and recommendations in the same format as for the global indicators.

However, the process for involvement in this consultation is different. Education International, as a member of the TAG group and focal point for CSOs will be submitting an overall set of feedback and recommendations on behalf of civil society, and GCE will support its members to make contributions to this in advance of the deadline. As such, members are asked to consider the questions in the TAG consultation document, and send their responses to Anjela Taneja (anjela@campaignforeducation.org) by Wednesday 2nd September. You may send your responses in any of the five GCE languages.

Broader campaigning on the indicator process

GCE is working on public messaging to engage broader civil society in understanding the key issues we are fighting for in the indicators process. This will comprise online articles and a social media campaign to make these issues more accessible. We will be contacting you later in the week with an update and tools you can use in between now and the conclusion of the indicator development process, which will be in early November.

Further post-2015 campaign activities

We will also be updating you shortly on planned activities around the UN SDG summit, which will be held in New York at the end of September. This will include an update on any relevant events, including those hosted by GCE and members, as well as information on getting involved in the World’s Largest Lesson, which GCE is supporting.

Thank you for all of your hard work across these processes so far; as we near the completion of the development phase, we urge you all to maintain the pressure to help secure the equitable, inclusive and free quality education agenda we have all strived to achieve.

The Global Campaign for Education (GCE) is a civil society movement working to end the global education crisis. Operating in almost 100 countries, our mission is to make sure that States act now to deliver the right of everyone to a free, quality public education.

A WORLD AT SCHOOL is a global initiative to mobilise efforts to deliver education and learning to the 58 million children who miss out. It is operated by UK registered charity Theirworld. Any opinions expressed in email are those of the individual and not necessarily of A World at School or Theirworld. The information contained in this message may be confidential and is intended for the addressee only. Any unauthorized use, dissemination of the information, or copying of this message is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, or a person responsible for delivering to the intended recipient, be advised that you have received this email in error and that any use is strictly prohibited. If you are not the addressee, then please notify A World at School immediately by return email and delete this message. Although this e-mail and any attachments are believed to be free of any virus or other defect, which might affect any computer or server system into which they are received and opened, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure that they are virus free and no responsibility is accepted by A World at School or Theirworld for any loss or damage from receipt or use thereof.

TAG Consultation ENG

Proposed GLOBAL_indicators_FINAL_EN(1)

MEMBERS BRIEFING ON INDICATORS PROCESS_EN(1)

 TARGET COUNTRIES INDICATORS PROCESS_EN

 http://www.globalcampaignforeducation.nl/k/n297/news/view/1021123/583957/gce-president-camilla-croso-speech-at-un-summit.html

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Leading By Example – Canada’s David Suzuki Foundation Blue Dot Initiative – Canadians Protect Our Right To A Healthy Environment

Environmental Education – Progress, Inspiration and Hope:

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http://bluedot.ca/?utm_campaign=BlueDot&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Marketo&utm_content=Banner_DSF&mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRoiuKzNZKXonjHpfsX56u8sW6axlMI%252F0ER3fOvrPUfGjI4GT8pjI%252BSLDwEYGJlv6SgFS7jNMbZkz7gOXRE%253D

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Interview [in English] Nnimmo Bassey Environmental Education/Rights Leader

Dear Community of Educators,

 
For those of us who actively participated in the CSD, we all knew and listened to environmental activist, Nnimmo Bassey [Nigeria],a very strong and well respected global leader.  Here is a recent interview [in English] with Nnimmo who is speaking to the SDGs, private sector engagement, protection of the planet, climate change and the up-coming COP in Paris.
 
 
 
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change
__________________
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell: +1-(734) 352•7429
Landline: +1-(734) 994•3612

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ReliefWeb

Training programs in Netherlands / 08 Sep 2015

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HP NY

The Greater Hunts Point 

 

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- CHAMBER ALERTS: latest information on
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VALUE-ADDED MEMBERSHIP FEE: $375 for 12 months, for business with less than 100 employees.
Contacts:
   – HP Chamber President: Josephine Infante,
     718-842-1717 ext 0
   – HP Chamber Business Liaison: Robert Sinko,
      718-986-4433
   – HP Chamber Webmaster: Adalberto Diaz.
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Seed edu

SEEd

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GreenBiz: Sustainable Development Goal 4 Ensure inclusive education GreenBiz.htm

Dear Colleagues,

Some of our members may be interested in and want to follow GreenBiz, http://www.greenbiz.com/topics/cop21
Here is a page related to education.
With best wishes,Dr. Noman Fazal Qadir
PhD(UK), MSc(UK), BSc, DIC(UK), DQMC(UK), MAS(UK)
email :- (personal ) nfqadir@yahoo.com ; nfqadir@gmail.com
cellular KSA +966 55 893 0089 ; UAE+ 971 50 6534979

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world: Indeed it’s the only thing that ever has.”
- Margaret MeadPlease Think B4U Print
1 ream of paper = 6% of a tree and 5.4 kg CO2 in the atmosphere
3 sheets of A4 paper pollutes 1 litre of water’SAVE WATER J  ~  SAVE ENERGY~ ~ SAVE EARTH

http://www.greenbiz.com/article/sustainable-development-goal-4-ensure-inclusive-education?mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRohsqvBZKXonjHpfsX56%2B0uX66%2FlMI%2F0ER3fOvrPUfGjI4GRcVlI%2BSLDwEYGJlv6SgFSLHEMa5qw7gMXRQ%3D

Sustainable Development Goal 4: Ensure inclusive education

Friday, July 31, 2015
Shutterstockmicrovector
Making sure everyone on the planet receives a fair shot in education is no black-and-white issue.

This story first appeared on the blog of Corporate Citizenship, a global business consultancy specializing in sustainability and corporate responsibility. Its series of articles about the 17 Sustainable Development Goals is running here.

Educating children, especially girls, is crucial to eliminating poverty. It is closely linked to other Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) such as health, gender equality, peace and stability. Education long has been on the agenda for charities, U.N. agencies and businesses.

We also have seen numerous corporate community investment program focused on education, not only to equip future workforces but also to equip society with the means to economically progress. And yet people still are excluded from society and employment through a lack of or poor education.

The second Millennium Development Goal (MDG) had a narrower focus on primary education than its successor SDG. While progress has been made on this target (PDF) with enrollment in primary education in developing regions at 90 percent in 2010, 58 million children of primary school-age were still out of school in 2012. That’s one in 10 kids that don’t get a basic education.

SDG No. 4 builds on the MDGs by setting broader and more ambitious targets to:

  • Ensure access to early childhood development;
  • Increase the number of youths and adults with relevant skills for employment;
  • Achieve equal access for men and women to university education;
  • Ensure all youths achieve literacy and numeracy; and
  • Provide inclusive learning environments for all, regardless of gender and disability.

We need to consider every connotation of the goal, to be successful in ensuring inclusive quality education. It’s about delving further into associated educational issues and improving the quality of education with teacher training, providing educational materials, ensuring school children don’t go hungry and improving sanitation in schools. What’s the point in having access to education if you are so hungry you can’t even concentrate, you can’t afford the bus fare or you catch diseases from school facilities?

So what does SDG No. 4 mean for businesses?

Businesses must understand that education is not only a key piece of the puzzle for poverty eradication. It also is crucial to develop the future workforce, foster innovation and generate stable and more prosperous societies. They need to take proactive roles in education, using their expert skills and interest in innovation to create shared value. In practice this means raising educational performance levels, shaping aspirations and creating a productive workforce.

A number of companies already use this approach in their education programs. Coca-Cola runs an educational program in the U.K. with Education Centers in their factories hosting workshops on manufacturing and innovation. Barclays works with NGO partners worldwide to equip young people with skills needed to find employment. H&M has focused on increasing access to early childhood development programs. Tata Consultancy Services runs an adult literacy program in India.

Businesses also can play an important role in addressing the periphery issues that hinder education by aligning operations, employee skills and community investments. For example:

  • UNICEF has shown that WASH (PDF) projects in schools can increase school attendance and performance. Unilever’s sanitation program provides hygienic toilet facilities in schools. The Toilet Board Coalition is a business-led coalition aiming to develop commercially viable solutions to the sanitation crisis.
  • Agroamerica supplemented children’s diets with bananas to combat malnutrition and reinforced the health and hygiene education of families.
  • Capgemini provides underprivileged girls in India with academic support and material support in the form of uniforms, clothes and stationery.

One thing we must remember is that education is a universal issue. An educational program in a developing country will look different to one in Europe. But in both cases, businesses have a lot to give and a lot to gain by harnessing their expertise to secure a quality education for all.

Topics:
Group - GreenBiz.com® is a registered trademark of GreenBiz Group Inc.
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Education for a Sustainable Future

Talkback Submission Call: “Education for a Sustainable Future”

This month we’re calling on the CSRwire community of experts, NGOs, corporates, academics & innovators for blogs that touch on any aspect of education. Share your insights and best practices!

Take a Look

With best wishes,

Dr. Noman Fazal Qadir
PhD(UK), MSc(UK), BSc, DIC(UK), DQMC(UK), MAS(UK)
email :- (personal ) nfqadir@yahoo.com ; nfqadir@gmail.com
cellular KSA +966 55 893 0089 ; UAE+ 971 50 6534979 ;
“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world: Indeed it’s the only thing that ever has.”
- Margaret Mead

Please Think B4U Print
1 ream of paper = 6% of a tree and 5.4 kg CO2 in the atmosphere
3 sheets of A4 paper pollutes 1 litre of water

‘SAVE WATER J  ~  SAVE ENERGY~ ~ SAVE EARTH

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OECD: Breaking down the silo: connecting education to world trends

Breaking down the silo: connecting education to world trends

Now connect to world trends

Tracey Burns, OECD Directorate for Education and Skills

Did you ever wonder if education has a role to play in stemming the obesity epidemic sweeping across all OECD countries? Or what the impact of increasing urbanisation might be on our schools, families, and communities? Or whether new technologies really are fundamentally changing the way our children think and learn? If so, you’re not alone.

The OECD’s work on Trends Shaping Education stimulates reflection on the challenges facing education by providing an overview of key economic, social, demographic and technological trends. It has been used by ministries to guide strategic thinking and in Parliaments as a strategic foresight tool. It’s also part of the curriculum in teacher education colleges, and is a resource for teachers when designing courses and lectures, as well as parents and students themselves.

The fourth edition of the book will be launched in January 2016. Two weeks ago, the Trends team travelled to Brussels to hold an expert workshop with researchers in a number of domains, including demography, governance, urban design, new technologies, climate change, financial literacy, small and medium enterprises, children and families, and banking.

Why take the time to meet face-to-face with these experts? To be honest we weren’t sure that it would yield any results. Researchers have many demands on their time, and it is not often that they are given a chance to look beyond their own particular speciality to think more holistically about global trends. Sometimes, though, it is by bringing people together unexpectedly that the best ideas emerge.

Will robots replace our teaching force in 10 years? In 20 years? Will new fertility technologies allow for designer babies (and, in parallel, “rejects” that did not turn out as expected)? Will online relationships rival or replace our friendship groups? What might this mean for families, and schools? These ideas might seem radical, but the trends behind them are supported by science. And while they are still speculative, there are a number of trends that could have an impact on education, if not today, then tomorrow or the next day. And yet most of our education systems still do not address them.

For example, climate change trends make it clear that across OECD countries we can expect to experience more and more extreme weather events. In most of our countries, the effects will be felt most acutely in cities, where the density of the population and ageing infrastructure (roads and services, such as water, electricity and plumbing) makes us especially vulnerable. If you combine this with worries about the emergence of new epidemics (MERS in Korea is just the latest example) and our ageing populations, a cautious city planner has reason for concern. And not just hypothetical reasons, either. Recent flooding in New York and other major cities has revealed the weakness of many of our emergency-response services.

So what does this have to do with education? Good question. In the short term, communities need to have a plan to educate their populations on what to do (and not do) in the event of a major storm or other extreme weather event such as drought or fires. In the medium and long term, we need to develop school infrastructure and transport that are designed to provide safe access for our students. Hoping it won’t happen is not a sustainable plan – certainly not for the communities that have already experienced an extreme weather event or those that are forecast to do so in the near future.

This is just one example. Important trends to keep an eye on range from the macro level (increasing globalisation and migration) all the way through national and regional labour markets, urban planning, and our changing demography and family structures. How can education support our ageing populations – currently one of the major demographic preoccupations for most OECD governments – to stay active and healthy well past retirement? Will cities keep growing at increasing speeds, or will we continue to see the decline of mid-size cities, such as Detroit (USA) and Busan (Korea)? What about new technologies in the classroom, will they change the way we teach and learn? Perhaps even our concept of what a classroom is?

In September, we plan to hold a second workshop in order to discuss how the trends we have identified might interact with education in the short and medium term. Stay tuned to find out how that goes, and to get a sneak peek between the covers of the next Trends Shaping Education volume, due out in January next year.

Useful links

OECD work on innovation in education

Guest author | July 23, 2015  | Tags: educationskills | Categories: Insights | URL: http://wp.me/p2v6oD-2b2
With best wishes,Dr. Noman Fazal Qadir
PhD(UK), MSc(UK), BSc, DIC(UK), DQMC(UK), MAS(UK)
email :- (personal ) nfqadir@yahoo.com ; nfqadir@gmail.com
cellular KSA +966 55 893 0089 ; UAE+ 971 50 6534979 ;
“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world: Indeed it’s the only thing that ever has.”
- Margaret MeadPlease Think B4U Print
1 ream of paper = 6% of a tree and 5.4 kg CO2 in the atmosphere
3 sheets of A4 paper pollutes 1 litre of water’SAVE WATER J  ~  SAVE ENERGY~ ~ SAVE EARTH
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SADC REEP EE Newsflash – South Africa

Volume 15 Number 4                                                                                                                                   (July 2015)
 
Monthly Environmental Education (EE) News Flash of the SADC Regional Environmental Education Programme
CONTENTS
1. NEWS         2. TRAINING      3. EVENTS/OPPORTUNITIES
4. PUBLICATIONS 5. NETWORKING
 
Please note:  Kindly address any emails to
 
1.               NEWS   
1.1. Stepping Up to Sustainability in 6 SADC countries
The future well-being of all life on Earth, including humans, is at great risk due to climate change. In southern Africa this risk is considered to be particularly high with increased droughts, floods and extreme weather events already threatening human well-being. For the past four years, WESSA (the Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa) has successfully implemented the Stepping Up to Sustainability Project in South Africa. This project is an educationally-driven response to climate change, grounded in alternative livelihood practices and the implementation of supporting technologies with a reduced environmental impact.
The Stepping Up to Sustainability Project has been supported by USAID, and other partners, and the good news is that in 2015, USAID have approved a second phase of the project, extending project implementation to include work in 6 SADC countries, namely: Zambia, Botswana, Swaziland, Namibia, Lesotho and South Africa.
The project was conceived as a Human Capacity Development (HCD) Programme in recognition of the need to develop environmental skills in the SADC region.  This need had been clarified through the SADC capacity needs assessment which was undertaken in 2012 (Mukuthe et al., 2012). A significant aspect of the project is thus capacity building through relevant, focused climate change education workshops and courses. The project also includes the establishment of an innovative ‘sustainability commons’ in each country, which will demonstrate and showcase the use and application of a range of sustainability technologies and will allow people to try out these low-carbon technologies.
The Sustainability Commons further present an opportunity for collaboration with, and the development of, Regional Centres of Expertise (RCEs) in support of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). It is envisioned that through these Sustainability Commons and the Stepping Up to Sustainability Project, regional RCEs will be strengthened.  The project also plans to work with and support the excellent work that is being undertaken by the UNESCO ESD Chairs which have been established at three leading universities in the region; which include the Universities of Swaziland, Botswana and Zambia. This support will ensure that the UNESCO GAP (Global Action Programme) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) – which are currently replacing the Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) – can be met (Taylor, 2014).  The goal of this project is thus to strengthen the work that many networks are doing to effectively reorient education so that empowering knowledge and skills become a reality,  and to strengthen education and learning towards sustainable development.
By: Tich Pesanayi, Charissa Jaganath and Jim Taylor
 
References
Mukute, M., Marange, T., Masara, C., Sisitka, H. and Pesanayi, T. (2012b). Future Capacity Building: Capacity Assessment for Environmental Policy Implementation. Howick, SADC-REEP.
Taylor, J. (2014) Shaping the GAP: Ideas for the UNESCO Post-2014 ESD Agenda. SAGE Publications (Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC) www.sagepublications.com Vol 8(2): 1–9 10.1177/0973408214548369

1.2 Message from the Global RCE Service Centre

 
Dear colleagues and friends,
Humid summer greetings from UNU-IAS!
We warmly welcome two new RCE members that have joined our network: RCE Port Harcourt, Nigeria and RCE Tirupati, India. At the same time we would like to inform you, that RCE Greater Western Paris will now be RCE Paris Seine. You can find the updated RCE World Map on the RCE Portal.
We would also like to take this opportunity to introduce you to Philip Vaughter, our new research fellow in the ESD Programme. Philip joined our team at UNU-IAS, beginning of June. A native to Minnesota in the United States, he received an undergraduate degree in biology from Iowa State University, and a post-graduate degree in Environmental Sciences from University of Victoria in New Zealand before returning to Minnesota to complete his PhD in Conservation Biology with a focus on Environmental Policy.
Before joining UNU-IAS, he worked as a research fellow at York University, Canada. Here, his work focused on analyzing the synergies and obstacles in linking local, regional, and national education policies to UN policy objectives. He also investigated the role of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) promoting ESD through curriculum, research, practice, and inter-institutional networks. Philip has taught undergraduate and post-graduate courses in ecology, political science, sociology, and statistics during his graduate and professional career. Philip will work on the development of the ESD Programme, do research activities, and coordinate among partnerships such as the RCE Network and ProSPER.Net. He has a particular interest in climate change and disaster risk reduction. Please join us in welcoming Philip to Japan, the ESD team and the RCE Community!
We are also pleased to announce that RCE Okayama has been nominated as a project for the UNESCO-Japan Prize on ESD. Within the framework of GAP, the UNESCO-Japan Prize on ESD honours outstanding efforts of individuals, institutions, organisations or other entities engaged in ESD activities. RCE Okayama had been nominated as one of three cases by the Government of Japan. You can find more information here (in Japanese only).
Sincerely,
Global RCE Service Centre
1.3   Dear UN SD Education Caucus Community,
The WEEC 2015, World Environmental Education Congress, was hosted in Gothenburg, Sweden, June 29-July 2. Too learn more visit Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/WEEC-2015/1484357418492492?fref=nf. The following are a few highlights from this Congress.
We met, we talked, we shared stories, we laughed, we shared meals with new and old colleagues & friends, we debated new concepts and ideas, and of course conversations about our challenges and key issues, as well as potential solutions.   A huge thank you to the conference organizers and program chair, and the many volunteers who worked tirelessly to ensure we could enjoy without complaint.  It was a major success.
Keynote Plenary Speaker
Here is the video link to the Congress’ Keynote Plenary speaker, Achim Steiner, Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) who shared keen insights about the importance of environmental education in terms of Planet and People:  http://youtu.be/KoLEEaLo13c  Education and learning for climate change:  Building the capacity of stakeholders to deal with impact of climate change – An experience from Morocco
Objectives: This project aims to reduce the vulnerability of coastal communities to the impacts of sea level rise, coastal flooding, and related extreme weather events. Its specific objectives are to assess population vulnerability to climate change impacts; to develop adaptation strategies and coastal policy land-use guidelines: and to develop local capacity for multi-stakeholder, participatory policy and planning processes.
Methods:  The analytical concept of the project consists of distilling relevant processes in order to identify trans-disciplinary cause-effect chains, stakeholder dialogues and social network analysis. Qualitative and quantitative techniques and inductive learning cycle were used to analyze the various existing contexts. A systematic stocktaking of the natural, the economic and social inventory, including a stakeholder analysis, from primary and secondary data was performed as well as an initial vulnerability analysis and assessment.
Results: The project has reached the objectives it has been assigned. A plan of action of integrated coastal management in the context of climate change has been developed.  This plan incorporates elements of adaptation strategies and coastal policy land-use  guidelines that reduce coastal population vulnerability and optimise the socio-economic and political trade-offs for different stakeholders, and a catalogue of useful and suitable adaptation strategies and measures deduced from stakeholder deliberation and participatory planning.
The Project has contributed intensively to raising awareness on the impacts of climate change and sea level rise in the region, and this has created an impetus and interaction between stakeholders encouraging win-win solutions in coastal zones actions. The multiplicative role of teachers and students in raising awareness and fomenting public debate has been enhanced by the project through the development of a teaching guide on climate change adaptation.
Conclusion: This project has produced valuable information and contributed significantly to raising awareness on climate change impacts, mainly sea level rise, in the study region and also in the whole country. Moreover its results have been translated into real and concrete actions.
2.   TRAINING
2.1     Forthcoming training
 Ev edu 3
Ev edu 2
Ev edu 1
3.    EVENTS/OPPORTUNITIES
                              
 
3.1. The 33rd International Conference of the Environmental Education Association of Southern Africa
 
The 33rd Environmental Education Association of Southern Africa (EEASA) conference will be held at Esibayeni Lodge, Matsapha Swaziland from 21-24 September 2015. All existing members and new members are encouraged to attend.
Any enquiries should be directed to Belusile Mhlanga. Emails address: eeasaconf@sea.org.sz
 
Theme: Recommitment to building sustainable societies: Scaling up ESD through GAP

For any information regarding EEASA please contact the Honorary Secretary, Ms Mumsie Gumede on email address: mumzo.g@gmail.com. Kindly cc Admin Secretary on email address: eeasa@eeasa.co.za

You can also get more information on EEASA Conferences from the EEASA Portfolio Manager Mr Caleb Mandikonza on email address:calebmandikonza@gmail.com

4.    PUBLICATIONS
4.1   African-Indaba e-Newsletter
The African-Indaba e-Newsletter is for hunter-conservationists and all people who are interested in the conservation, management and sustainable use of Africa’s wild natural resources. African Indaba is the official CIC Newsletter on African affairs, with editorial independence. To read the newsletter, visit http://africanindaba.com/current-issue/.  For more information about the International Council for Game and Wildlife Conservation CIC, go to www.cic-wildlife.org.
5.    NETWORKING
___________________________________________________________
Compiled by Phindile Sithole
Please submit other relevant EE/ESD activities to the SADC REEP Monthly News Flash and feel free to forward this message to people who might be interested.
Please inform us if you do not wish to receive this EE News Flash.
SADC Regional Environmental Education Centre
PO Box 394, Howick 3290, South Africa

Achim Steiner World Envin Education Congress

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Southern African Development Community (SADC) Countries

http://www.sadc-reep.org.za/

Africamap
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U.S. K-12 Education — Historic Win for Environmental Education in Senate Act

From: Don Baugh <captbaugh@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, Jul 20, 2015
Subject: Historic Win for Environmental Education in Senate Act
To: Don Baugh <captbaugh@gmail.com>

The US Senate’s Every Child Achieves Act, S.1177, passed the Senate last Thursday, 81-17.  As you know, this is the federal funding bill for education, previously known as the No Child Left Behind Act.
Intact were provisions drawn from the No Child Left Inside Act, that represent historic wins for environmental education:
1) “Field-based or service learning that enables students to use the local environment” would be an allowable use of STEM funding. (THIS IS A HUGE WIN!)

2) Environmental literacy would be part of the after school programming sections of the bill.

We spend eight years to get to this point, and have lots of people to thank for this historic win.  Chief among those to thank are Senator Reed and his staff, the No Child Left Inside ”Dream Team”, led by Charlie Stek, Gary Heath, Monica Healy, Jeri Thomson, Kevin Sullivan and Sarah Bodor, the North American Association for Environmental Education’s advocacy team that continued the campaign, and those that supported the team by pushing every button you could.  THANK YOU!
Even without House action, this is a significant symbolic victory, that allows us to make the case to schools across the nation, that the Senate voted overwhelmingly, in a bi-partisan vote, in support of Environmental Education.  The House did so in the 109th Congress, with the adept leadership of Congressman Sarbanes.  If this becomes law, it will be a significant step towards fulfilling the expectation that every student graduate environmentally literate.
Thank you for your help through the years!
Don Baugh
Upstream Alliance
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The UN SD Education Caucus – Who we are and more… Voices Rising Globally

Dear Community of Educators, Friends and Colleagues,

 
The 2015 World Environmental Education Congress, held in Gothenburg, Sweden, last week added another exciting, informative gathering highlighting initiatives from around the globe.  1000s of initiatives are going on at any one time, addressing the challenges we face.  Like the Nike logo, our community can be said to  “Just Do It.”  and carry-on.
 
 
Bremley, UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chair and Co-Coordinator Climate Change, has written a description of the work of the UN SD Education Caucus that I would like to share with all of our members whose commitment and leadership contributions make us so uniquely successful:
“It has been an amazing journey Co-Chairing with Pam as we approach the lead-up to COP 21 in Paris, the SDGs and beyond,  and the future we want to create.  The UN SD Education Caucus plays a critical role in advancing Agenda 21 and the Rio Declaration/Principles and JPOI mandates on environmental education. The Ed. Caucus is pivotal to harmonization, alignment and connectivity with all other suggested Sustainability Goals. The UNCSD Education Caucus is the progressive voice for integration of other Sustainability Goals, with an emphasis on social responsibility through learning, through engaging an informed political forum, stakeholders, and civil society – as well as the private sector – utilizing the nexus of environmental sustainability, engaging people in sustainability, and learning, from the community to the President to the intergovernmental levels.
 
 
As you go about your work, if you know of colleagues and/or networks that would like to join us, send us a brief description as to why/who they are/title, organization, contact information, and we will follow-up.  Please share with your colleagues and networks.  In the meantime, keep up the good work you are doing and keep us updated.
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell: +1-(734) 352•7429
Landline: +1-(734) 994•3612
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World Education Forum and Sustainable Development – Ministries of Education
Dear Friends and Colleagues,

PARIS – This year marks a turning point for the world, with the international community adopting a new global development strategy in September and negotiating a universal deal to combat climate change in December. To succeed, policymakers must recognize that today’s global imperatives – to eradicate poverty and improve wellbeing, while restoring the Earth’s balance – form a single agenda, and that the most effective means of achieving it is education.
The good news is that the proposed set of Sustainable Development Goals, which will underpin global efforts for the next 15 years, reflect this recognition. Likewise, Article 6 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) stipulates that education, training, and public awareness on climate change must be pursued.
But, with negotiations on these global agreements far from complete, it is vital that policymakers’ emphasis on education continues to be reinforced. To this end, the world’s education ministers must take the opportunity offered by this month’s World Education Forum in Incheon, South Korea, to highlight the role that education can and should play in advancing sustainable development.
A strong education system broadens access to opportunities, improves health, and bolsters the resilience of communities – all while fueling economic growth in a way that can reinforce and accelerate these processes. Moreover, education provides the skills people need to thrive in the new sustainable economy, working in areas such as renewable energy, smart agriculture, forest rehabilitation, the design of resource-efficient cities, and sound management of healthy ecosystems.
Perhaps most important, education can bring about a fundamental shift in how we think, act, and discharge our responsibilities toward one another and the planet. After all, while financial incentives, targeted policies, and technological innovation are needed to catalyze new ways of producing and consuming, they cannot reshape people’s value systems so that they willingly uphold and advance the principles of sustainable development. Schools, however, can nurture a new generation of environmentally savvy citizens to support the transition to a prosperous and sustainable future.
Some schools are already becoming learning labs for sustainable development, where young students are being prepared to adapt to and help mitigate the consequences of climate change. Guided by the UNFCCC – as well as related initiatives like the UN Alliance on Climate Change Education, Training, and Public Awareness – governments are increasingly integrating education strategies, tools, and targets into national development policies. The UNESCO-led UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, which began in 2005, was explicitly intended to instill in every human being “the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values necessary to shape a sustainable future.”
Together, UNESCO and the UNFCCC are not only promoting climate-change education in schools; they are also giving teachers the tools and knowledge they need to provide that education through online courses. Already, more than 14 million students and 1.2 million teachers in 58 countries have been engaged in such learning, and 550 business schools have signed on to the Principles for Responsible Management Education, developed by the UN Global Compact.
This progress, though important, is just the beginning. What is needed now is a global movement, with every student in every country learning about sustainable development from well-trained teachers, equipped with the appropriate curricula and resources. An ambitious sustainable development agenda, together with a legally binding global climate deal, could go a long way toward catalyzing such a movement.
Of course, we cannot secure a sustainable future in a matter of months. But, with a well-designed set of commitments and targets, we can move onto the right path. And, with effective educational programs that instill in future generations the importance of restoring Earth’s balance and delivering a prosperous future for the many, rather than the few, we can stay on that path.
That is the message that education ministers must emphasize at their upcoming forum, and that policymakers should heed as they negotiate this year’s two critical global agreements.
Gayatri Raghwa
Outreach Programme Senior Specialist – Education
Environmental Information, Science & Outreach Management
T:+971 (2) 693 4630
F:+971 (2) 446 3339
E: graghwa@ead.ae
T: +971 (2) 4454777
PO Box:45553
Al Mamoura Building
Murour Road
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
www.ead.ae
جاياترى راغوا
أخصائي أول برنامج التوعية – التعليم
قطاع إدارة المعلومات والعلوم والتوعية البيئية
Env Agency Dubai
EnvironmentAbuDhabi
  إنتـاج ورقة واحـدة مقـاس A4 يسـتهلك حـوالي 10 لترات من المياه. نرجو وضع ذلك في الاعتبار قبل طباعـة محتـوى هـذا البريــد الإلكترونــي.
It takes approximately 10 litres of water to manufacture a single sheet of A4 paper. Please consider this before printing this email .
This email (including any attachments) sent by or on behalf of the Environment Agency – Abu Dhabi or one of its affiliated entities (together “EAD”), is confidential and may be privileged or otherwise protected. If you receive this email in error, you may not disclose,copy or use it. Please inform us and then delete it from your system without copying it or disclosing its contents to anyone. Messages sent to and from EAD may be monitored to ensure compliance with internal policies and to protect EAD’s interest. Emails are not secure and cannot be guaranteed to be error free. Anyone who communicates with EAD by email is taken to accept these risks and EAD accepts no responsibility for damage that may be caused.
هذا البريد الإلكتروني ومرفقاته (إن وجدت)  تم إرساله من قبل أو نيابة عن هيئة البيئة – أبوظبي أو من أحدى الجهات التابعة لها، ويعتبر وثيقة سرية قد تحتوي على معلومات تتمتع بالحماية والحصانة. وفي حالة استلامكم هذه الرسالة بطريق الخطأ، لا يجوز الكشف عن محتواها أو نسخها أو استخدامها. ونرجو إخطارنا على الفور، ثم القيام بحذفها من الحاسب الآلي الخاص بكم. وقد تكون الرسائل المرسلة من وإلى هيئة البيئة – أبوظبي مراقبة لضمان الالتزام بالسياسات الداخلية ولحماية مصلحة هيئة البيئة – أبو ظبي. ولا تعتبر رسائل البريد الإلكتروني آمنة ولا يمكن ضمان خلوها من الأخطاء. وعلى كل من يتواصل مع هيئة البيئة – أبوظبي عبر البريد الإلكتروني أن يتقبل مثل هذه المخاطر ولا تتحمل الهيئة أية مسؤولية عن الأضرار التي قد تنجم عن ذلك.
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Intergenerational Justice – “The Future We Want… to Create.”

Dear UN SD Education Caucus Learning Communities,

This posting may be of interest to our members who are creating intergenerational learning communities, inspiring youth to think critically leading to action… not hopelessness.  From Viv Benton:

—-Thanks for the question, Barbara .

I work with a group of young people, 14 to 21 years old, on a radio programme called Your Planet Needs You, and I’m using techniques aligned with Positive Youth Development. My group report that despite the future looking rather bleak, especially here in Australia with the present climate change denying government, they feel empowered through the actions they are taking. They research their own topics and present them to an international audience, and they talk with friends about what they can individually do to address climate change. Last night, one of the team members read a recent document released by the government called The Intergenerational Report, and presented his critique of climate change only being given 2 paragraphs when he thought it should be front and centre. I was so impressed that he would read the report and that he had such a strong understanding on how climate change needed to be approached. He’s about to turn 16.

I have presented climate change to the team as a complex puzzle that needs unravelling, a challenge if you like, and I ask that they start designing the new carbon constrained world into which we need to move. I’m so inspired by the solutions and discussions they bring to the table. One young girl attending a school for high achievers reported that one of her teachers had told the year 11 students that they may as well party because the end of the world was nigh. This girl went back to her class and suggested that the school change certain practices to mitigate climate change and many of her peers did so. Another member of the team along with a friend got his entire school to become solar powered and called in an energy efficiency expert to monitor the school and suggest changes to buildings and practices they could achieve, and then he monitored them to make sure they were done. I had another young man suffering from severe depression who when part of the team looses his depression, and is now studying at university to help breed climate change survival food sources.

Backcasting, as used in The Natural Step is useful, which suggests that you look at the outcome you want to achieve and then ask what steps one needs to take to get there, selecting the lowest hanging fruit to change first.  http://www.naturalstep.org/

Jane Gleeson-White’s book “6 Capitals, The revolution capitalism has to have–or can accountants save the planet?”, Allen & Unwin, 2014 is also tremendously inspiring and we have talked with Jane extensively on the programme.

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/books/review-six-capitals-by-jane-gleesonwhite-on-accounting-for-the-environment-20141213-1262xc.html

But what buoys me up most is that I’m seeing the rise of a new determination which seems to emerge from action. i suppose what I’m saying is that the bad news can be harnessed to make young people more determined that they will not stand for their world being taken away from them. I think the time has come for the rainbow warrior, which needs our support and a great deal of courage. Never, in my opinion, has there been a better time for the age barriers to be dismantled, because we’re all in this together.

Enjoying the discussion. Thank you.

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GCE-NL Nieuws

GMR 2015 conference

Education for All 2000-2030 – Achievements and Challenges for North and South

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New Publications on Sustainable Development Higher Ed

New publications on Sustainable Development
Dear Colleagues,
As the New Year starts, the following publications are now available:
• Transformative Approaches to Sustainable Development at Universities  Edited by Walter Leal Filho  Springer, Berlin, January 2015, ISBN 9783319088365, 603 pp. World Sustainability  Series. (from WSSD-U-2014)
• Integrative Approaches to Sustainable Development at University Level:  Making the Links  Edited by W. Leal Filho, L. Brandli, O. Kuznetsova, A. Paço  Springer, Berlin, January 2015, ISBN  9783319106892,  731 pp. World Sustainability  Series.  (from WSSD-U-2014)
• Integrating Sustainability Thinking in  Science and Engineering Curricula  Edited by W. Leal Filho, U. Azeiteiro, S. Caeiro, F. Alves  Springer, Berlin, January 2015, ISBN  9783319094748, 630 pp. World Sustainability  Series.  (from WSSD-U-2014)
• Implementing Campus Greening Initiatives: Approaches, Methods and Perspectives  Edited by W. Leal Filho, N. Muthu, G. Edwin, M. Sima, (Eds.)  Springer, Berlin, January 2015, ISBN 9783319119601, 362 pp.  World Sustainability  Series.
• E-Learning and Education for Sustainability  Edited by U. Azeiteiro, W. Leal Filho, S. C. Caeiro  Peter Lang Scientific Publishers, Frankfurt, January 2015, ISBN 9783631626931, 290 pp. Environmental  Education, Communication and Sustainability, Series.
Rgds,  W Leal
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Sustainable Development Goals report and role of education (International Council for Science)

Dear Colleagues,
 You might be interested to know of an international report which has just been released by the International Council for Science, and which provides an expert commentary on the proposed 2015 Sustainable Development Goals.  I was asked to write the section on Goal 4 and its associated targets – my main point was that the proposed Goal and targets are strong on access to  education but weak in terms of viewing education and learning as a key part of engaging and helping address the 16 other SDGs. The full report may be found  here (see p27 for Education):
  and news coverage is here:
 The report will now be used as part of the UN backed process of refining the SDGs before they are agreed and launched later this year.
- Stephen
 Stephen Sterling
Professor of Sustainability Education
Centre for Sustainable Futures
Plymouth University
Kirkby Lodge
Drake Circus
Plymouth PL4 8AA
United Kingdom
tel 01752 588898
Chair of PU Sustainability Executive Group
National Teaching Fellow
Recent articles:
Sterling, S, Maxey, L  and Luna, H (2013) The Sustainable University – progress and prospects,  Abingdon: Routledge.
Sterling, S (2012) ‘The Future Fit Framework: an introductory guide to teaching and learning for sustainability in HE’ https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/node/3573
Edited By Paula Jones, David Selby and Stephen Sterling  http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781844078783/
Plymouth University: Top of the UK Green League, 2015

This email and any files with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the recipient to whom it is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient then copying, distribution or other use of the information contained is strictly prohibited and you should not rely on it. If you have received this email in error please let the sender know immediately and delete it from your system(s). Internet emails are not necessarily secure. While we take every care, Plymouth University accepts no responsibility for viruses and it is your responsibility to scan emails and their attachments. Plymouth University does not accept responsibility for any changes made after it was sent. Nothing in this email or its attachments constitutes an order for goods or services unless accompanied by an official order form.

June Gorman <june_gorman@sbcglobal.net>

24 feb. 2015

aan Pamela, Education
Dear Stephen and others -
I read your section on SDG Goal 4 (Education) and found it incredibly insightful and on point.  This comment in particular:
“The goal currently emphasizes education in terms
of its potential economic and social benefits – there
is no recognition that education through awareness
raising, training and capacity building can help protect
environmental quality and lead to wiser resource use;
only Target 4.7 mentions sustainable development as
such.
This goal would benefit greatly from extended
wording to reflect the fact that most educational policies
and programs do not yet reflect the purposes and
goals of sustainable development, and some even
exacerbate sustainability issues. For many education
policies and programs, a radical re-alignment towards
sustainable development and sustainable futures is required.”
seems to me critical and the hardest non-cognitive, values-excavation to actually get across in these documents and SDG discussions.  Subsequently not raising these issues explicitly, as you try to do here, results in continuing with old and obsolete educational models that have clearly proven more oriented to reinforcing un-sustainability and increasing justifications for inequality, than the different more necessary educational values-realignment to these very sustainability goals and issues.
I was indeed very emboldened to read it here in your words, Stephen, as it is the conversation “least heard” and most critical in truly creating the education as you say, “Education can play a vital role in bringing about sustainable change over time because it is change which is owned by affected and participating stakeholders.”
For me, I have found this essential to understand and the key word here is the word “affected”.  Otherwise you do indeed develop “Education for Alienation” and disassociate the values-dependent emotional, social and cultural intelligences from lived experience and true life-long learning that empower the needed motivation for true systems change that all the SDG’s actually depend on to succeed.  Education, in the critical ways you have described and expanded it, must include this understanding to achieve any of our subsequent Sustainable Development Goals and thus the one most important cross-cutting initiative for all of them.
I was very heartened by your clear ability to see and relay this.  You have my strong support and help in any way I can.
I see that you are in the UK, as I am, and would love to talk further on these critical educational concepts,
Best Regards,
June
June Gorman, Educator and Educational Theorist
Founder, Transformative Education Forum<http://www.tef-global.org/>
Learning Research Fellow, Schumacher Institute http://www.schumacherinstitute.org.uk
Education Advisor, UN SafePlanet Campaign <http://www.safepla.net/>
Board Project Director for Outreach, International Model United Nations Association<http://imuna.org/>
Steering Committee, (UNESCO/Global Compact) K-12 Sector for Sustainability Education <http://www.uspartnership.org/main/view_archive/1>  )
Member, UN Education Caucus for Sustainable Development

Member, UN Commons Cluster

From: Pamela Puntenney <pjpunt@umich.edu> To: Education Caucus – list <WSSD-EducationCaucus@umich.edu> Sent: Monday, February 23, 2015 

Subject: Sustainable Development Goals report and role of education (International Council for Science)

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GCE-NL Nieuws

15 jaar Education for All
Save the date: Nederlandse lancering GMR-2015 op 23 april

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GCE-NL Nieuws 9 december 2014
GCE-NL Nieuws
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Schooling — Rethinking Education.​.. A People’s Curriculum for the Earth
Dear Friends and Colleagues,

Rethinking Schools began as a local effort to address problems such as basal readers, standardized testing, and textbook-dominated curriculum. Since its founding, it has grown into a nationally prominent publisher of educational materials.
While the scope and influence of Rethinking Schools has changed, its basic orientation has not. Most importantly, it remains firmly committed to equity and to the vision that public education is central to the creation of a humane, caring, multiracial democracy. While writing for a broad audience, Rethinking Schools emphasizes problems facing urban schools, particularly issues of race.
Throughout its history, Rethinking Schools has tried to balance classroom practice and educational theory. It is an activist publication, with articles written by and for teachers, parents, and students. Yet it also addresses key policy issues,.
Brazilian educator Paulo Freire wrote that teachers should attempt to “live part of their dreams within their educational space.” Rethinking Schools believes that classrooms can be places of hope, where students and teachers gain glimpses of the kind of society we could live in and where students learn the academic and critical skills needed to make that vision a reality.
Rethinking Schools attempts to be both visionary and practical: visionary because we need to be inspired by each other’s vision of schooling; practical because for too long, teachers and parents have been preached at by theoreticians, far-removed from classrooms, who are long on jargon and short on specific examples.
Announcing A People’s Curriculum for the Earth, to learn more  http://www.rethinkingschools.org/about/index.shtml
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change
WM Rethinking Education
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Subject: Just released! 2nd edition of ‘Young Children and the Environment: Early Education for Sustainability’ To: ENV-ED-RESEARCH@jiscmail.ac.uk

Dear Colleagues

Just released! 2nd edition of ’Young Children and the Environment: Early Education for Sustainability’, edited by Australian early childhood academic, Julie M. Davis, published by Cambridge University Press.

Read the blurb!

‘Young Children and the Environment’ tackles one of the biggest contemporary issues of our times – the changing environment – and demonstrates how early education can contribute to sustainable living. An essential text for students in early childhood education and a practical resource for preschool educators and primary school teachers, it is designed to promote education for sustainability from Birth to 8 years. This second edition illustrates the difference that early childhood educators can make by working with children, their families and the wider community to tackle the contemporary issue of sustainable living. It has been substantially revised and updated, with a new section exploring sustainability education in a variety of global contexts. Researched and written by authors recognised as leaders in their own countries, this section provides readers with international resources and perspectives to further their teaching in early childhood education for sustainability. The text engages with new curriculum initiatives that place greater emphasis on educating for sustainability, and equips educators with knowledge to work with this revised content. It remains accessibly written with early childhood case studies, vignettes and ‘provocations’ to engage readers and to inspire new ways of thinking about the environment, the wider world, young children and the transformative power of early education.

‘Young Children and the Environment: Early Education for Sustainability’ (2nd ed.) can be ordered at:

http://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/education/education-history-theory/young-children-and-environment-early-education-sustainability-2nd-edition

WM edition Young children

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IUCN – Commission on Education and Communicat​ion

CEC @ 2014 IUCN World Parks Congress

In this issue, we share the exciting activities led by CEC members at the  2014 IUCN World Parks Congress (WPC) in Sydney, Australia that starts today, November 12, 2014. CEC is co-leading stream 8: “Inspiring a New Generation.” Stay up to date with all of stream 8 activities by following us on twitter (@WPCing) and join the conversation online via www.facebook.org/WPC.ING.

Best wishes, Juliane Zeidler, CEC Chair

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Higher Education – National Summer Institute on Learning Communitie​s at The Evergreen State College July 13-17, 2015
National Summer Institute on Learning Communities at The Evergreen State College
July 13-17, 2015
“…the best boot camp for learning communities in the country…”
This institute is designed to help two- and four-year institutions:
·         Explore the potential for learning communities on their campus
·         Start a new learning community (LC) program
·         Expand an existing LC program
Applications are due by Jan. 15, so we can customize the institute to support your team.
Cost: $1,290 per person
Team size: 5-10 people
To learn more and get an application, go tohttp://www.evergreen.edu/washingtoncenter/institute/index.html.
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SEEd Updates

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Politics, Economics, and Formal Education

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

On November 1st and article appeared in the New York Times illustrating the impact of national politics and political relations, economics, defining a country’s formal education system.  The article by Jo Becker and Steven Lee Myers “Putin’s Friend Profits in Purge of Schoolbooks” raises serious questions about priorities and raises awareness that schooling is very much integrated into the political and economic priorities of a nation.

We need to hear more from education- finance – political experts in  the UN discussions on education, SDGs, MDGs and find ways to integrate rights, equity, CBDR, security, and public engagement.  To learn more

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/02/world/europe/putins-friend-profits-in-purge-of-schoolbooks.html?emc=edit_na_20141101&nlid=55800521&_r=0

All the best,

Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh

UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs

Co-Coordinators Climate Change

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UN CC:Learn News: New UN CC:Learn Resource Guides Promote Advanced Learning on Climate Change & Health and on Climate Change Education

Dear Colleagues,

UN CC:Learn is a partnership of 33 multilateral organizations which supports Member States in designing and implementing results-oriented and sustainable learning to address climate change. The Secretariat for UN CC:Learn is provided by the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). One of the objectives of UN CC:Learn is to facilitate access to existing climate change learning materials and to support the development of complementary learning resources, as appropriate. Funding for UN CC:Learn is provided by the Swiss Government. For further information please contact:uncclearn@unitar.org.
Here is a copy of their latest news article:  http://uncclearn.org/news/resource_guides_health_education
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change with Tiahoga Ruge, Jim Taylor, Tich Pesanayi, Kavita Myles, 
and Suzana Padua
Youth Co-Coordinators Katherine Browne and Mohammad “Armen” Golrokhian
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell:  (734) 330-0238
Voice/Fax: (734) 994-3612

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Dear Climate Colleagues,
Please see below the latest news from UN CC:Learn.
New UN CC:Learn Resource Guides Promote Advanced Learning on Climate Change & Health and on Climate Change Education
The UN CC:Learn Secretariat has launched two new Resouce Guides providing a tour of the best and most relevant resources, mostly drawn from within the UN System, on climate change & health and on climate change education.
The Resource Guide for Advanced Learning on Understanding the Climate Change and Health Interface, which was developed with technical advice of the World Health organization (WHO), has been developed for those interested in gaining a more advanced understanding of the linkages between climate change and health. 
The Resource Guide for Advanced Learning on Integrating Climate Change in Education at Primary and Secondary Level, which was developed with technical advice of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), provides resources relevant for learning about both formal and informal education on climate change at primary and secondary level.  
The guides are part of a series facilitating access to state-of-the-art materials relevant for climate change learning. Other two Resource Guides have been issued on the Fundamentals of Climate Change Scienceand on Predicting and Projecting Climate Change.
 
About UN CC:Learn
UN CC:Learn is a partnership of 33 multilateral organizations which supports Member States in designing and implementing results-oriented and sustainable learning to address climate change. The Secretariat for UN CC:Learn is provided by the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). One of the objectives of UN CC:Learn is to facilitate access to existing climate change learning materials and to support the development of complementary learning resources, as appropriate. Funding for UN CC:Learn is provided by the Swiss Government. For further information please contact:uncclearn@unitar.org.
National Summer Institute on Learning Communities at The Evergreen State College
July 14-18, 2014
“…the best boot camp for learning communities in the country…”
This institute is designed to help two- and four-year institutions:
·         Explore the potential for learning communities on their campus
·         Start a new learning community (LC) program
·         Expand an existing LC program
Applications are due by Feb. 3, so we can customize the institute to support your team.
Cost: $1,290 per person
Team size: 5-10 people
To learn more and get an application, go to http://www.evergreen.edu/washingtoncenter/institute/index.html.
Cara McCann, on behalf of Washington Center
Clerical Aide, Washington Center for Improving the Quality of Undergraduate Education
Phone: 360-867-5610
UNESCO Bangkok is also looking for a Programme Assistant in education for sustainable development: http://www2.unescobkk.org/job/JA01-14%20Programme_Assistant_ESD.pdf
Please share!
Barbara Trzmiel UNESCO Bangkok TVET and Skills Development

http://a6c6b.s28.it/f/rnl.aspx/?fie=tpw_q_y:&x=pv&fj=sxcf:=ootz0&x=pv&1&x=pv&&x=pv&=macb6l05m2c0di&e.&x=pp&q/9c29b28a-NCLM

 

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http://us7.campaign-archive2.com/?u=28bd1bd9bea6c1d080e817d70&id=43e3b860f5&e=69e5480594

NL Nieuws 3 oktober 2014                                                                             Bekijk dit bericht in uw browser

Open Up! Workshop on inclusive education in development and emergencies Don’t get lost in all the barriers, but look for opportunities in inclusive education. That’s one of the conclusions of last week’s workshop ‘Open Up!’ on inclusive education in development and emergency situations. About 40 representatives of NGOs gathered for the workshop to discuss dilemmas in inclusive education and to learn more about EU funding opportunities. Read more: the report of the meeting, the speech of Lars Bosselmann (CBM), and a short guide to links and resources on inclusive education

Join the campaign of Education International for Quality Education for All Education International and its member unions are calling on the United Nations to invest in quality education for all. Right now, but also in the new UN development goals. You can join the campaign by sending your support! Read more: how can you join? Open letter to Ban Ki-Moon.

Copyright © 2014 Global Campaign for Education Nederland, All rights reserved. U ontvangt deze email omdat u contact met ons hebt opgenomen voor informatie of een bijeenkomst, of hebt deelgenomen aan onze campagne. www.globalcampaignforeducation.nl GCE@Edukans.nl

Global Campaign for Education Nederland

p/a Edukans, Postbus 1492, 3800 BL Nederland

www.globalcampaignforeducation.nl

Amersfoort, 3800 BL / Netherlands

Add us to your address book  /  Meld u hier aan voor dit bericht

Meld u hier af voor dit bericht    Wijzig hier uw gegevens

 

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FYI…  http://educationenvoy.org/education-in-emergencies-syria/  


Dr. P. J. Puntenney

Environmental & Human Systems Management

1989 West Liberty       

 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA 

E-mail:  pjpunt@umich.edu

Cell:  (734) 330-0238

Voice/Fax: (734) 994-3612

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 UN Foundation & Better World Campaign

UN Foundation, other groups call for education for Syrian refugees
The United Nations Foundation and other groups are calling for for the full financing of education for the largest population of Syrian refugees in Lebanon through a UN plan endorsed by the government of Lebanon and the secretary-general of the UN by funding the global humanitarian appeal RRP 6. By funding this plan, we will show it is possible to get children into school during an emergency and continue with the full-scale regional and global responses for education in emergencies because Education Cannot Wait.

http://educationenvoy.org/education-in-emergencies-syria/

 

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Climate change and disaster risk reduction: call for abstracts of input papers for the UNISDR Global Assessment Report 2015 Dear colleagues​,

Dear All,

Every two years the Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction (GAR) provides a global assessment of disaster risk reduction and a comprehensive review and analysis of the natural hazards affecting humanity. In previous years the GAR contributed to achieving the Hyogo Framework of Action (HFA) by monitoring risk patterns and trends as well as progress in disaster risk reduction, and by providing strategic policy guidance to countries and the international community.
The GAR scheduled for 2015 will serve a different purpose: to inform the development of the successor to the HFA (HFA+), to be adopted at the next World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in Japan in March 2015. The 2015 GAR will be based on, among other things, a series of thematic reviews roughly organised along the HFA core indicators. Sixteen thematic research areas were thus defined and work on these areas is in progress; ‘climate change adaptation and mitigation’ was recently added as a 17th thematic research area.
The United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) has invited the Stockholm Environment Institute to coordinate the preparation of a background paper on climate change adaptation and mitigation in the context of the HFA or the HFA+. The background paper will explore the following issues:
- Climate change as a driver of disaster risk and the contribution of mitigation to disaster risk reduction
- Shared factors promoting or hindering adaptation, mitigation and disaster risk reduction
- Avoiding and addressing loss and damage associated with climate change impacts
Collectively these three issues should capture the diversity of knowledge and experience on how climate change affects disaster risk, and how adaptation and mitigation could contribute, and have contributed, to disaster risk reduction and vice versa.
An important source of information for the background paper will be a series of input papers addressing in detail specific aspects of the aforementioned three issues. All interested experts are invited to submit abstracts of proposed input papers. More information can be found in a recent concept paper, which also presents a number of sample topics to inspire the preparation of input papers. The concept paper is available athttp://www.preventionweb.net/english/professional/networks/private/hfa-thematic-review/ (scroll all the way down to Research Area 17).
Abstracts of no more than 300 words need to be submitted by Wednesday 22 January at the latest, using the submission form available on the same website. Authors of selected abstracts will be notified by Friday 24 January 2014 and invited to prepare their input papers by Friday 21 February 2014.
We regret that no financial support is available for the preparation of input papers, but UNISDR is considering opportunities to publish the input papers, possibly collated as a special journal issue, along with the background paper and the GAR.
With best wishes,
Richard Klein
SEI HAS MOVED — PLEASE NOTE NEW ADDRESS
Professor Richard J.T. Klein
Senior Research Fellow and Theme Leader ‘Reducing Climate Risk’, Stockholm Environment Institute, www.sei-international.org
Co-Director, Nordic Centre of Excellence for Strategic Adaptation Research, www.nord-star.info
Editor-in-Chief, Climate and Development, www.tandfonline.com/tcld
Postal address: Postbox 24218, 104 51 Stockholm, Sweden
Visiting address: Linnégatan 87 D, 115 23 Stockholm, Sweden (map: http://bit.ly/SEI-Stockholm)
Skype, Twitter: rjtklein
Homepage: www.rjtklein.net

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UNESCO-UNEVOC e-Forum

IOSR Journal of Research & Method in Education (IOSR-JRME) e-ISSN: 2320–7388,p-ISSN: 2320–737X Volume 3, Issue 5 (Nov. –Dec. 2013), PP 73-76 www.iosrjournals.org

www.iosrjournals.org  73 | Page

The Place of Technical Education towards Skill Acquisition to National Development Ogundele, Alexander Gbenga School of Technical Education, Kwara State College of Education (Technical), Lafiagi, Kwara State, Nigeria.

http://www.iosrjournals.org/iosr-jrme/papers/Vol-3%20Issue-5/L0357376.pdf?id=7370

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Dear Friends and Colleagues,

Eighth Session of the Open Working Group (OWG) of the UN General Assembly (UNGA) on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

3-7 February 2014 | UN Headquarters, New York, United States of America

UN SD Education Caucus member, Leonard Sonnenschein, attended the OWG-8 providing input into the dialogue on oceans.  Attached is a copy of report, note his intervention will be included in the work on oceans.

“Engagement at every level of society is needed to lead the way towards a sustainable and profitable future.”

Sincerely yours in conservation and education,

On behalf of the UN SD Ed. Caucus, Leonard thanks for the good work on our behalf.
Education Caucus Report Feb 2014-1              /         PastedGraphic-1
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus
__________________
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell:  (734) 330-0238
Voice/Fax: (734) 994-3612

 

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Effective integration of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in technical and vocational education and training (TVET) toward knowledge management in the changing world of work by Muhammad Sukri Saud, Babawuro Shu’aibu*, Noraffandy Yahaya and M. Al-Muzammil Yasin* in African Journal of Business Management Vol. 5(16), pp. 6668-6673, 18 August, 2011. Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/AJBM/edition/18_August_2011

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                 UNEVOC e-Forum, 25 June to 9 July 2013

 

 

UNICEF “Reaching the MDGs  (Marginalized and Disadvantaged Girls)  to Achieve the MDGs  (Millennium Development Goals)”

http://www.unevoc.unesco.org/e-forum/Tanzania_Workshop_REPORT_FinalAug06.doc

http://laborsta.ilo.org/applv8/data/INFORMAL_ECONOMY/2012-06-Statistical%20update%20-%20v2.pdf

http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au

http://www.unevoc.unesco.org/go.php?q=e-Forum+-+Message+Board&skin=efor&lang=en&action=threadlist&thread=2389

 

http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au

 

http://www.unevoc.unesco.org/go.php?q=e-Forum+-+Message+Board&skin=efor&lang=en&action=threadlist&thread=2389

 

http://www.worldwewant2015.org/education2015

International Day of the Girl Child 2013 – Innovating for Girls’ Education

Innovating for Girls’ Education” E-discussion on the World We Want platform

 Week Two discussion has just started!

 Go to Week Two discussion and contribute today – http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/397135

 In the lead-up to the International Day of the Girl Child 2013, themed Innovating for Girls’ Education UNICEF has started a new e-discussion with a similar theme, on the World We Want online platform. The discussion will be coordinated by the Youth Advocacy Group of the United Nations Global Education First Initiative (GEFI).

This e-discussion aims to gather and learn about innovative approaches, ideas and solutions from different regions, countries and communities that help improve girls’ education and their learning outcomes, particularly of those most disadvantaged. The e-discussion will be facilitated by expert moderators and will run for three weeks from 16 September to 6 October, each week covering a new theme. Week Two: Innovate for Girls Education and Gender Sensitivity will run through 4 October.

How can I participate? Register, or log-in on http://worldwewant2015.org/education2015 . Then, simply click on the E-Discussion: Innovating for Girls’ Education – WEEK TWO. Contribute by leaving your views, ideas and stories of innovative solutions in the Post A Reply window.  

We are particularly looking for stories, case studies and experiences.

 Share with your networks and organizations too – invite them to join this conversation by registering at http://worldwewant2015.org/education2015 

 

 

http://www.unevoc.unesco.org/worldtvetdatabase1.php?ct=PAK

 

http://www.unevoc.unesco.org/go.php?q=e-Forum+-+Message+Board&skin=efor&lang=en&action=threadlist&thread=2391

 

Centre for Global Development chapter on Social exclusion: the emerging challenge in girls’ education http://www.unevoc.unesco.org/e-forum/lewis-lockheed-chapter1.pdf

 

Skills needs of the labour markets http://www.unevoc.unesco.org/e-forum/Skills%20needs%20of%20the%20labour%20markets.pdf

 

http://cadtm.org/3rd-CADTM-Europe-Summer-University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

European conference on Quality Assurance in VET on 26 September in Västerås, Sweden. The conference web site is: http://fu.mysite.nu/default.aspx
The conference is free but participants have to cover the cost of their travelling and accommodation themselves

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Executive Summary (Zero Draft): Thematic Consultation on Education

in the post-2015 agenda. Envisioning education in the post-2015

development agenda

Thematic Consultation on Education in the post-2015 agenda

http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/349169

http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/349180

 

 

 

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[Youth] Synthesis report on Tackling youth unemployme​nt through TVET

2013eForum virtual conference Youth Unemployment

 

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New post on Education Post 2015 ICAE 

http://educationpost2015icae.wordpress.com/2013/05/28/icaes-comments-to-the-draft-executive-summary-of-the-global-consultation-on-education

ICAE’s Comments to the draft Executive Summary of the Global Consultation on Education

 

 

ON BEHALF OF NIRANTAR, CENTRE FOR GENDER & EDUCATION,

INDIA                      Website: http://www.nirantar.net

 

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The Side Event will discuss the Rio+20 Treaty on Higher Education which was  .

office@copernicus-alliance.org

 

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  Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE)   http://www.iisd.ca/csd/escwa/

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http://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/5/6/2327

 

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The UNESCO Chair in Community Based Research and Social Responsibility in

Higher Education grows out of and supports the UNESCO global lead to play “a key

role in assisting countries to build knowledge societies”.

PRIA-IT
Budd L Hall, PhD
Co-Chair
UNESCO Chair in Community-Based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education
School of Public Administration
PO Box 1700, STN CSC
Victoria, BC. V8W 2Y2
Canada

http://unescochair-cbrsr.org/

 

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Module 1_Introduction to the Resource Kit.pdf 2870 kB

WM Module 1_Introduction to the Resource Kit

WM  (3) Girls’ Education Challenge Innovation Window Guidance English

WM  (5) Challenge Badge Pilot Testing Questionnaire v2

WM Edu (7) Challenge Badge Pilot Testing_Questionnaire

WM (8) Edu End_Hunger_ChBdg_v5bis

WM Edu (11) Oceans_Challenge_Badge_07_06_12

WM Youth-Matter-Your-guide-to-making-Ecocide-a-crime

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Best wishes,
Emma
Emma Lovell Programme Officer – Adaptation and Resilience, Energy
Climate Change, Environment and Forests
Overseas Development Institute 203 Blackfriars Road London SE1 8NJ United Kingdom

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ILO Youth Unemployment Trends Generation at risk PDF

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http://www.theirm.org/publications/documents/rm_standard_nl_15.11.04.pdf

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http://www.theirm.org/publications/PUstandard.html

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http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Invitation-Second-International-Conference-on-1834592.S.214632672?qid=b9cb0a11-b251-44e9-97fa-b1d4c1d1a795&trk=group_most_popular-mc-rr-ttl&goback=.gmp_1834592

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http://www.cvent.com/events/second-international-conference-on-iso-31000-standard/invitation-7e97ce339ac7448c9930a5a0e12cf62a.aspx

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