AGRICULTURE FAO / Trade & Dev

 

AGRICULTURE FAO

Profielfoto van Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN
——————

Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN

Dear ALL in CSA from SUb saharan Africa
WM Belinda Gates llogo icon small bill melinda gates foundation
There is an opportunity by Bill and Melinda gates foundation. see the link below.
I have several idea if any body want to have collaboration then welcome to write me at my email drfahdrasul@uaf.edu.pk
Regards
DR fahd Rasul

On Mon, Sep 1, 2014 at 12:30 PM, Maria Nuutinen <maria.nuutinen@fao.org> wrote:

Dear Dyamdek and Martial, Thanks for bringing the topic of resilience towards climate change in agriculture up, and defining it. You can have a look at interesting presentations on the topic on this page: FAO/OECD Workshop: Building Resilience for Adaptation to Climate Change in the Agriculture Sector http://bit.ly/1wNUovN ODI has also published interesting articles on the topic, you may want to have a look at. http://www.odi.org/programmes/climate-environment/adaptation-resilience Sometimes people seem to wonder how resilience and capacity to adapt to changing climate are related. What would be your take on that? Best, Maria Facilitator

Fahd  Rasul    Ph.D
0092 322 7881778  (cell no)
Assistant professor,
Agro-Climatology Lab
Dept. of Agronomy
University of Agriculture Faisalabad
Dear Dyamdek and Martial,
Thanks for bringing the topic of resilience towards climate change in agriculture up, and defining it.
You can have a look at interesting presentations on the topic on this page: FAO/OECD Workshop: Building Resilience for Adaptation to Climate Change in the Agriculture Sector http://bit.ly/1wNUovN
ODI has also published interesting articles on the topic, you may want to have a look at.
Sometimes people seem to wonder how resilience and capacity to adapt to changing climate are related. What would be your take on that?Best, Maria Facilitator

Dear Friends

I am really interested on this programme. I am country focal point of CSA Alliance and Independent Ezpert to UNFCCC, an Article 6 focal point for my
organisation too. Please see more in www.unfccc.int in focal point and JI
list. I want to involve in your programme. Let me know an update or relating with
this forum.

Best Regards,

Mr. Thura Aung M.Sc.,MPH
Director of Programme
Radanar Ayar Rural Development Association
www.radanarayar.org| www.gyca.org

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UNFAO Webinar on #NAMAs in #agriculture starts at 13:45 Rome time (UTC+2) at: http://bit.ly/nama-in-ag-webinars – #NRC-CC-MITIGATION

Dear Colleague,

UNFAO Webinar on #NAMAs in #agriculture is starting in at 13:45 Rome time (UTC+2) at: http://bit.ly/nama-in-ag-webinars 

- Welcome to join us!

 For more information and recordings of the webinar:

www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/87484/en/

 On behalf of organizers,

Maria Nuutinen

Climate change officer – Mitigation of climate change in agriculture (MICCA) team, FAO

maria.nuutinen@fao.org  

 http://bit.ly/csa_learning_event_fao

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TWN Climate Info: Corporate-Smart Greenwash: Why We Reject the Global Alliance on Climate-Smart Agriculture

 

TWN Info Service on Climate Change (Sept14/03)
24 September 2014
Third World Network
www.twn.my
 

Corporate-Smart Greenwash:

Why we reject the Global Alliance on Climate-Smart Agriculture

We, the undersigned civil society organisations, hereby manifest our rejection of the proposed Global Alliance for Climate-Smart Agriculture to be launched at the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Change Leaders’ Summit. This proposed alliance is a deceptive and deeply contradictory initiative.

Food producers and providers – farmers, fisherfolk, and pastoralists – together with our food systems are on the front lines of climate change. We know that urgent action must be taken to cool the planet, to help farming systems – and particularly small-scale farmers – adapt to a changing climate, and to revive and reclaim the agroecological systems on which future sustainable food production depends.

The Global Alliance for Climate-Smart Agriculture, however, will not deliver the solutions that we so urgently need. Instead, “climate-smart” agriculture provides a dangerous platform for corporations to implement the very activities we oppose. By endorsing the activities of the planet’s worst climate offenders in agribusiness and industrial agriculture, the Alliance will undermine the very objectives that it claims to aim for.

Although some organizations have constructively engaged in good faith for several months with the Alliance to express serious concerns,[1] the concerns have been ignored. Instead, the Alliance is clearly being structured to serve big business interests, not to address the climate crisis.

We reject “climate-smart” agriculture and the Global Alliance for a number of reasons already articulated in previous efforts to interface with the promoters,[2] including:

1. No environmental or social criteria

The final framework of the Alliance does not contain any criteria or definitions for what can – or cannot – be considered  “climate-smart agriculture.” Industrial approaches that increase greenhouse gas emissions and farmers’ vulnerability by driving deforestation, using genetically modified (GM) seeds, increasing synthetic fertiliser use or intensifying industrial livestock production, are all apparently welcome to use the “climate-smart” label to promote their practices as solutions to climate change.

2. Carbon trading

The originators of “climate-smart” agriculture – the FAO and the World Bank – have a vision that “climate-smart” projects will be funded in part by carbon offset schemes. Many of our groups question the environmental and social integrity of carbon offsetting. Carbon sequestration in soils is not permanent and is easily reversible, and should be especially excluded from schemes to offset emissions. Carbon offset schemes in agriculture will create one more driver of land dispossession of smallholder farmers, particularly in the Global South, and unfairly place the burden of mitigation on those who are most vulnerable to, but have least contributed to, the climate crisis.

3. A new space for promoting agribusiness and industrial agriculture

Companies with activities resulting in dire social impacts on farmers and communities, such as those driving land grabbing or promoting GM seeds, already claim that they are “climate-smart.”  Yara (the world’s largest fertilizer manufacturer), Syngenta (GM seeds), McDonald’s, and Walmart are all at the “climate-smart” table. Climate-smart agriculture will serve as a new promotional space for the planet’s worst social and environmental offenders in agriculture. The proposed Global Alliance on Climate-Smart Agriculture seems to be yet another strategy by powerful players to prop up industrial agriculture, which undermines the basic human right to food. It is nothing new, nothing innovative, and not what we need.

We do urgently need climate action! Unfortunately, the Alliance seriously misses the mark. Real climate solutions are already out there in farmers’ fields – based on agroecological practices and the relocalisation of food systems to effectively fight hunger. Instead of creating one more body for business-as-usual, governments, funding agencies, and international organizations should be taking bold action: committing to shift resources away from climate-damaging practices of chemical-intensive industrial agriculture and meat production and towards investment in and commitment to agroecology, food sovereignty, and support to small-scale food producers.

The International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development concluded in 2008 that business-as-usual in agriculture is not an option; instead, a thorough and radical overhaul of present international and agricultural policies is essential to meet the challenges of the future.

We reject the Global Alliance as one more step by a small percentage of the UN’s total membership to promote industrial agriculture against all the evidence of its destructive impacts on people, biodiversity, seed, water, soils, and climate. It is merely one more attempt to block the real change needed to fix our broken food systems and our broken climate, change which instead must be based on food sovereignty and agroecological approaches for agriculture and food production andthe effective reduction of greenhouse gases.


International Organisations & Farmers’ Movements

ActionAid International

Centro de Estudios Internacionales y de Agricultura Internacional (CERAI)

CIDSE

Coalition pour la Protection du Patrimoine Genetique African (COPAGEN)

Corporate Europe Observatory

Earth in Brackets

Foro Rural Mundial (FRM)

Friends of the Earth International

IBON International

Inades-Formation

International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM)

International-Lawyers.Org (INTLawyers)

GRET

LDC Watch

Mesa de Coordinación Latinoamericana de Comercio Justo

Send a Cow

South Asia Alliance for Poverty Eradication (SAAPE)

South Asia Peasants Coalition

Third World Network


National Organisations & Farmers’ Movements

Abalimi Bezekhaya (Farmers of Hope), South Africa

ACRA-CCS Foundation, Italy

Action Contre la Faim, France

Africa Europe Faith & Justice Network (AEFJN), Brussels

Agrosolidaria Federacion el Tambo Cauca, Colombia

Alliance International sur les OMD (AIOMD), Niger

All Nepal Peasants Federation (ANPFa), Nepal

Antenne Nationale du Niger (AAIOMD-Niger)

Asemblea Nacional Ambiental (ANA), República Dominicana

Asociacion de Prosumidores Agroecologicos “Agrosolidaria Seccional Viani” Colombia

Asociacion Nacional de Produtores Ecologistas del Peru (ANPE)

Asociacion Viva Amazonica de San Martin, Peru

Association Malienne pour la Sécurité et la Souverainté Alimentaires (AMASSA)

Bangladesh NGOs Network for Radio and Communication (BNNRC)

Beyond Copenhagen, India

Biofuelwatch, UK

Biowatch South Africa

Bolivian Platform on Climate Change, Bolivia

Campaign for Climate Justice Nepal (CCJN)

Carbon Market Watch, Belgium

CCFD-Terre Solidaire, France

Centre for community economics and development consultants society (CECOEDECON), India

Cecosesola, Barquisimeto, Venezuela

Centre d’Actions et de Réalisations Internationales (CARI), France

Centre for Learning on Sustainable Agriculture (ILEIA), the Netherlands

Community Development Association (CDA), Bangladesh

Community Empowerment for Progress Organization (CEPO), South Sudan

CONCEPT ONG, Sénégal

EcoFrut, Colombia

EcoNexus, UK

Equity and Justice Working Group Bangladesh (EquityBD).

Family Farmers’ Association, UK

Farm & Garden Trust, South Africa

Farms Not Factories, UK

Féderation des Eglises Evangéliques des Frères (FEEF), the Central African Republic

Federacion Nacional de Cooperativas Agropecuarias y Agroindustriales de Nicaragua (FENACOOP)

Find Your Feet, UK

Food First Information and Action Network (FIAN) Nepal 

Forum des Femmes Africaines pour l’Education (FAWECOM), Comoros

Friends of Siberian Forests, Russia

Friends of the Earth – England, Wales & Northern Ireland

Friends of the Earth – Latvia

Fundación Caminos de Indentidad (FUCAI) Colombia

Fundación Lonxanet para la Pesca Sostenible, Spain

Fundación Solidaridad, Bolivia

Harvest of Hope, South Africa

Gramya Resource Centre for Women, India

Groupe d’Action de Paix et de Formation pour la Transformation (GAPAFOT), Central African Republic

Human Rights (HR) Alliance, Nepal

Human Rights Organisation of Bhutan (HUROB)

INHURED International, Nepal

Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP), USA

Instituto de Cultura Popular, Argentina

Jagaran Nepal

Jubilee South Asia/Pacific Movement on Debt and Development (JSAPMDD), Philippines

Karnataka State Red Gram Growers Association, India

Labour, Health and Human Rights Development Centre, Nigeria

L’Association des Jeunes Filles Pour la Promotion de l’Espace Francophone (Membre du CNOSCG), Republic of Guinea

MADGE Australia

MASIPAG, Philippines

National Civic Forum, Sudan

National Federation of Youth Organisations in Bangladesh

National Network on Right to Food, Nepal (RtFN)

Organización Casa de Semillas Criollas Atenas, Costa Rica 

Pakistan Fisher Folk Forum (PFF), Pakistan

Partners for the Land & Agricultural Needs of Traditional Peoples (PLANT), USA

People’s Alliance of Central-East India (PACE-India)

PHE Ethiopia Consortium

Plateforme Haïtienne de Plaidoyer pour un Développement Alternatif (PAPDA), Haïti

Plateforme pour le Commerce Equitable, France

Public Advocacy Initiatives for Rights and Values in India (PAIRVI)

Red Ecologista Autónoma de la Cuenca de México

Red Nicaraguense de Comercio Comunitario (RENICC)

Red Peruana de Comercio Justo y Consumo Ético, Perú

Rural Reconstruction Nepal (RRN)

SADF ONG, Democratic Republic of Congo

Sanayee Development Organisation, Afghanistan

Secours Catholique (Caritas), France

SOCDA (Somali Organization for Community Development Activities)

Sudan Peace and Education Development Program (SPEDP), South Sudan

Texas Drought Project, USA

Unión Nacional de Agricultores y Ganaderos de Nicaragua (UNAG)

Unión LatinoAmerica de Technicos Rurales y Agrarios, Argentina

UK Food Group, UK

Vicaria del Sur, Diócesis de Florencia, Colombia

Voluntary Action for the fight against climate change and the adverse effects of Sulfur Diesel, (AVOCHACLISD), Burundi

World Development Movement, UK

Youth Network for MDGs, Madagascar 

[1]  Civil society organisations have sought to engage with the Alliance through a number of different routes including a sign-on letter signed by over 80 organisations, participation in the Friends of the Alliance conference calls, and attending a meeting of the Alliance in the Hague in July 2014.

[2]  http://www.climatesmartagconcerns.info

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Global Landscape Forum Youth Session

Hi everyone,  

The 2014 Global Landscapes Forum is taking place in Lima, Peru December 6th and 7th, and it offer numerous exciting opportunities for youth to get involved! This year’s approach encourages capacity building masterclasses and lively discussions leading into a dragons’ den pitching session. This blogpost explains it all:www.landscapes.org/youth 

Applications for facilitation and pitching leadership roles are open for five more days, until September 28, so apply now! Those accepted will receive financial assistance for transportation and accommodation to Lima. We’ll then open registrations for a series of skill building masterclasses that will take place the day prior to the youth session. 

If you cannot participate in person in Lima, you can still be heard and share your ideas through online discussions and contribute a story or article to the youth blog (email submissions to landscapes.youth@gmail.com)   

We’d like you to help us ensure all young people know about this opportunity. Below are some tweets and facebook/linkedin/google+ suggestions to share among your networks. 

Please feel free to modify and share as needed!  

FB/LinkedIn/G+

Are you:

  • ·         Involved in forestry, agriculture, fisheries, mountains or land use and passionate about the role youth play?
  • ·         18-30 years old?
  • ·         Good at fostering lively group discussions or presenting ideas in an interesting and succinct way?
  • ·         Passionate about finding creative solutions to big challenges?

Apply NOW to lead action-oriented roundtable discussions or pitch innovative ideas to an expert panel at the 2014 Global Landscapes Forum in Peru: http://bit.ly/1t6dPNL

We also welcome stories and articles for publication on the youth blog, you can email your submission to landscapes.youth@gmail.com

Twitter:

APPLY NOW: Facilitate a discussion or pitch idea @GlobalLF youth session in Peru http://bit.ly/1t6dPNL #thinklandscape #COP20 

Great opportunity for #youth to build skills, lead & contribute! Check it out & applyhttp://bit.ly/1t6dPNL #thinklandscape #COP20 

Btw 18-30yrs? Passionate about #landuse & #climate? Apply for leadership role @GlobalLF http://bit.ly/1t6dPNL #UNFCCC #thinklandscape 

Dragons’ dens. Play-doh. Roundtables. This yr, @GlobalLF youth session has it all. Join us: http://bit.ly/1t6dPNL #thinklandscape #COP20 

Thanks,

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New CSA briefs for Climate Change Summit / FAO & CCAFS – #NRC-CC-MI​TIGATION

Dear Colleagues,

New briefs on CSA realized by CCAFS and FAO for the occasion of the Climate Summit next week. The world leaders will be discussing in the summit climate-smart agriculture among other themes with the aim to stimulate action. 

Thanks to Claudia García for sharing!

Best,

Maria  

 · Climate-Smart Agriculture – What is it about? Scientists‘ perspectives:  

View this contribution on the web site

A reply to this message will be sent to all members of Climate-Smart Agriculture Discussion group.

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[csa event​] Fwd: CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Climate, Socio-Econ​omic and Environmen​tal Baselines and Scenarios for Use in Climate Impact, Adaptation and Vulnerabil​ity Assessment​s in Agricultur​e for ECOWAS

Three (3) Consultancies

Deadline:   September 23, 2014    /   Location: Africa

The United Nations University – Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNU-INRA) is currently accepting proposals to conduct a three (3) months data collection to gather climate, socio-economic and environmental data and information for use in climate impact, adaptation and vulnerability assessment in agriculture for ECOWAS.

The official calls for proposals are attached. The calls describe the overall work required and give instructions for submission of a proposal. Please note that the deadline for receiving proposals is September 23, 2014 at 17:00 GMT.

Email enquiries should be sent to recruit-inra@unu.edu.

These consultancies form parts of a research project on Climate Change, Agricultural Trade and Food Security in ECOWAS, which is being sponsored by the African Climate Policy Centre of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ACPC/UNECA). The overall objective of the research project is to assess whether or not agricultural production systems and trade policies in ECOWAS can be adjusted to alleviate the impact of climate change on food security and promote sustainable development in the region.

We are very much grateful if you would disseminate the information to your various networks.

Best regards,

Calvin Atewamba, PhD. Research Fellow – Green Economy United Nations University – Institute for Natural Resources in Africa Accra, Ghana Tel.: +233-302-500396, +233-302-500792 E-mail: atewamba@inra.unu.edu, atewamba@gmail.com Website: www.inra.unu.edu
Francis Hypolite Kemeze Ph-D Candidate in applied Agricultural Economics and Policy University of Ghana, Accra, Legon P.O.BOX LG 68 LEGON, ACCRA, GHANA Tel: 00233540350484 Email: kefrhy@gmail.com / kefrhy36p@yahoo.fr

Skype: kefrhyp
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YOUTH

Thema  [youth] Fwd: Reminder: Africa Climate Smart Agriculture Alliance Side Event Monday 22SEP2014 10:00-13:00 NYC

Event Monday 22SEP2014 10:00-13:00 NYC
To: African SD Policy Makers <africasd-l@lists.iisd.ca>

*REMINDER*

 

The Africa Climate Smart Agriculture Alliance*

22 Sept 2014 – 10:00-13:00

Hilton Manhattan East Hotel, 304 East 42nd Street, New York

 

The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) and the International
NGOs[*]

 

#14885bb473cd0801_14885839d2234e3c_14885262b9a05dba_14885099e01e17f8_1488500195bfb8e6__ftn1>
present the Africa CSA Alliance High Level Side Event. At the eve of the
Climate Summit 2014, this is an opportunity to learn about Africa’s action
on Agriculture-Climate Change & to open-up new collaborations and
investment partnerships.

Rationale*

The NEPAD Agency is spearheading implementation of the AU-NEPAD Agriculture
Climate Change Programme. This is an integral part of the Comprehensive
Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) and relates to attaining
the productivity and environmental resilience goals as articulated in the
2015-2025 CAADP Results Framework, which was recently endorsed at the June
2014 Malabo Summit by African Heads of State and Government. The target of
the AU-NEPAD Agriculture Climate Change Programme is to stimulate and
galvanise multi-sectoral and trans-national efforts to leverage political,
technical and financial commitments and action into scaling up the
sustained practicing of climate smart agriculture (CSA) through several
strategies.

One of these strategies and new initiative is the NEPAD-iNGO CSA Alliance.
This is a unique and innovative partnership between the NEPAD Agency, the
international NGOs, on one side, and national level state and non-state
players on the other, to leverage each other’s strengths to stimulate and
support grassroot capacity and efforts to scale-up CSA in Africa. The
NEPAD-iNGO CSA Alliance is targeting 6 million farm households by 2021.

Event*

The High Level Side Event will consist in defining Climate Smart
Agriculture from an African perspective & describing the new partnership
and its foreseen practical achievements. Lead speakers will include: Mr. *John
Kufuor*, former President of Ghana & UNSG Special Envoy on Climate Change;
H.E. Mrs. *Tumusiime Rhoda Peace*, AU Commissioner for Rural Economy &
Agriculture; and Dr. *Ibrahim Mayaki*, NEPAD Agency CEO. Exposés will be
followed by a panel discussion and an open debate.

Open to all. Light lunch will be served.

*RSVP to Tendai Sithole tendait@nepad.org <tendait@nepad.org>** by Friday
19 Sept 2014 noon*

More on: http://www.csaforafrica.org/

<.#14885bb473cd0801_14885839d2234e3c_14885262b9a05dba_14885099e01e17f8_1488500195bfb8e6__ftnref1>

The NGOs consortium includes: CRS, Concern, CARE, World Vision, Oxfam; and
benefit from the technical support of CCAFS, FARA, FAO, and FARNPAN

Consult the #DFS2014 outcomes: the Dakar Agenda for Action
http://nepad.org/regionalintegrationandinfrastructure/news/3351/dakar-agenda-action-%E2%80%93what-dsf-has-achieved>

*More info on YAFSA <http://pages.au.int/caadpyoa> & CAADP@10
< http://www.nepad-caadp.net/> & PAF <http://www.africanfisheries.org/>*
NEPAD Agency
New York Bureau
+13475307926
Twitter: @NEPAD_AU
Tumblr: GREENAFRICA
Visit our website www.nepad.org
NEPAD is a Decade + 3: Download “Africa’s Decade of Change”
< http://www.nepad.org/nepad/knowledge/doc/2846/africas-decade-change-reflections-10-years-nepad>
- Reflections on 10 years of NEPAD

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 CGIAR Developmen​t Dialogues – A Nigerian flood story!

Dear Friends,

Kindly read through and vote for my story on the CGIAR Development Dialogues Blog!

http://dialogues.cgiar.org/blog/nigerian-flood-story/

Thanks,

Abayomi Awokola

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[youth] Welcome to the Youth and CSA community – #NRC-CC-MI​TIGATION

Dear Member,
Thank you for your interest towards the community of practice Youth and Climate-Smart Agriculture! All of us are happy to have you on board as a member of the online community of practice hosting over 190 members.
Information about the discussion forum
To ensure the continuity of communication, your email has been added to our platform, the DGroup, that works mainly through email. The group consists of more than 180, who are sharing information about new key publications and events related to climate-smart agriculture and youth.
This community or exchange group is voluntarily facilitated by members, Divine and Vagish, and all members are welcome to post questions and inspire discussion related to the topic.
The community platform was created after a learning event on climate-smart agriculture which inspired Divine and Vagish to gather a separate list of emails to discuss youth-related issues.
For the content of the community, you may want to get to know the disclaimer (copied at the end of this email).
Introduction to the DGroup
The Youth and Climate-Smart Agriculture Community of practice can be found at:
You may participate in this discussion at any time. To send new messages to the group, just write an email to:
To reply to previous messages, just click reply in your email, like any other email you receive. It is very easy.
Important: Remember that a reply will go to the whole group, not only to the person who sent the message you are replying to. Moderator checks messages. In order to keep the emails related to the topic of the community, the moderator may request you to modify your email or consider if it should go only to the sender or the whole group. In case you wish to contact only the sender, kindly copy the person’s email to the “To:” field.
Functions: profile, calendar and library
Dgroups is primarily designed for email use. However, you can also visit the discussion group platform through: https://dgroups.org/fao/csa_event/youth
using your username and password (after resetting it). There’s also a calendar and library space for useful links and materials. All members can add items.
The forum gives some details of the members of the group, as well as all messages that have been posted. Any of us can post documents on the website and these are available to all members who visit the site. If you wish you can update your personal details which are on the forum, including changing your email address.
If you wish, you can write a short (about 5 phrases) introduction of yourself and the reasons why you are interested in participating in this community, and what are the challenges you are facing in your work related to climate-smart agriculture and youth], and send this to the community:
Welcome!
Moderator Maria,
 PS. There is also information on the Dgroups FAQs, if needed:   http://next.dgroups.org/help/
Disclaimer of the community:
The Communities of practice hosted by the MICCA Programme of FAO are networks of voluntary peers, and not of organizations. Messages posted to our forums represent the personal views of members, and not the positions of the agencies they are employed by. In posting edited and unedited messages, or incorporating them into synthesized responses, the Community accepts no responsibility for their veracity or authenticity. Members intending to use or transmit the information contained in messages should be aware that they are relying on their own judgement.
Information on the MICCA forums is provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis. No claim, representation or warranty is made by FAO as to the accuracy, completeness or authenticity of the information shared on this platform. FAO declines responsibility for the content posted by MICCA Community members and, under no circumstances, shall be liable for any loss, damage, liability or expense suffered that is claimed to result from the use of such content, or the use of the information posted on this platform, including without limitation, any fault, error, omission, interruption or delay.
FAO reserves the right to alter, limit or discontinue any part of the platform at its discretion. Hyperlinks to non-FAO Websites do not imply any official endorsement of or responsibility on the part of FAO for the opinions, ideas, data or products presented at these locations, or guarantee the validity of the information provided. The sole purpose of links to non-FAO sites is to indicate further information available on related topics. The information is provided on the basis that Users accessing the platform assume responsibility for assessing its relevance, accuracy and suitability for application.
The designations employed and the presentation of material in the MICCA forums platform do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the FAO concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. The mention of specific companies or products of manufacturers, whether or not these have been patented, does not imply that these have been endorsed or recommended by FAO in preference to others of a similar nature that are not mentioned. The views expressed herein are those of the information providers and do not necessarily represent those of FAO.
The materials contained in this web site are for information purposes only. The MICCA Programme expressly disclaims all liability to any person in respect of anything and in respect of the consequences of anything done or omitted to be done wholly or partly in reliance upon the whole or any part of the contents of this web site. The MICCA Programme is not responsible for any third party contents which can be accessed through our web sites or forums.

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Youth Engagement Project

These short you tube videos may be of interest. 

We did a documentary of the Project on Youth Empowerment and the film maker was so excited about the project that he had the children create a Tele-drama.  This has been aired on National television. 

1. Project documentary: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8znr47zTgM 

2. Dramahttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qVzYdqaYf8k  

Prof Chris Gordon

Director

Institute for Environment and Sanitation Studies

College of Basic and Applied Sciences

University of Ghana,  Legon, Accra,  GHANA 

Web Page: http://iess.ug.edu.gh/

Office: 0302 962720   /  Mobile: +233 268 117 200 or +233 208 117 200

http://www.linkedin.com/pub/christopher-gordon/43/292/a79

Associate Editor: Climate and Development

Please consider your environmental responsibilities before printing emails and documents

 

Dear Narcisse,

I am interested in hearing more about your focus on youth and climate smart agriculture. As a doctoral student, I am researching, ‘Youth, Livelihoods and Politics in Africa’ with a focus on youth and agriculture. CSA is emerging as one of the critical areas of engagement, and I would like to hear more about your research strategy on this.

Regards,

Grace Mwaura
DPhil Candidate, Geography & Environment
St. Hilda’s College, University of Oxford

OX4 1DY Cowley Place, Oxford, UK
Phone: +447748875973
 

Currently at:

P.O Box 1364-00621 Nairobi, Kenya

Skype:gracemwaura Phone: +254725901420  

To: Climate-Smart Agriculture Discussion group
Cc: aishu@aol.com; Climate-Smart Agriculture event; csayouth@gmail.com; vagish1@live.com


Climate-Smart Agriculure -Reasearch Strategy
 

Dear all

Once again, thanks a lot for work done so far.

Currently we are preparing research strategic plan that will be sent to you next week for your inputs.

The overall objective of the research strategic plan is to increase and transfer knowledge related to CSA. We will also explore how CSA can reduce youth unemployment focus on developing countries in the next five years.

Best 


Narcisse GAHI

Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction
applied to Water Resources, Food Security and Nutrition
PhD Student , Climate Risks and Water Management and Policy
Msc, Water-Sanitation-Environment

Université de Cocody-Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire
IAVS, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso 

mobile:(+226) 72 68 12 68/ 66 38 00 78 (BF)
ebox.2: gahizn@gmail.com / Skype: nz.gahi
Web:
http://www.iavs-bf.org

 

View this contribution on the web site

A reply to this message will be sent to all members of Climate-Smart Agriculture Discussion group.

View this contribution on the web site

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Subject: Climate-smart agric Conf Montpellier, France ABSTRACT SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED

Due to inquiries from partners and participants, we have extended the deadline for the CSA Montpellier Conference to Sunday, 30 November 2014.

Submit your abstract now!

Keynote speakers to be announced soon: watch the web site.

Don’t forget to register. Early bird fees apply until 31 December 2014.

Climate-smart agriculture Conference 16-18 March 2015 Montpellier, France

csa2015.cirad.fr

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[csa_event​] Carbon in dryland soils – Multiple essential functions

Subject: [csa_event] Carbon in dryland soils – Multiple essential functions
(French below)
The French Scientific Committee on Desertification (CSFD) has released the English version of its thematic issue focusing on carbon in dryland soils:
“Soil organic carbon (SOC) has a key role in the overall behaviour of soils and agroecosystems. Increasing its content enhances soil quality and fertility, thus improving agricultural resilience and sustainability and, in turn, food security of societies. Soils also contain the largest pool of carbon interacting with the atmosphere. Agricultural and forestry systems that reduce atmospheric carbon concentrations by sequestering this carbon in biomass and in soil organic matter are carbon sinks. Combating desertification contributes to soil carbon sequestration, thus mitigating global warming, while contributing to sustainable agricultural management.
Soils have only recently become a global environmental issue, especially in the framework of three international environmental conventions. These conventions have interrelated issues, especially with respect to dryland regions—desertification, climate change and biodiversity loss. Few tangible policies have, however, been drawn up concerning carbon in dryland regions. The impact of agricultural, pastoral and forestry activities on the carbon cycle need especially to be taken into greater account.
In the current carbon market system, carbon volumes of agricultural and forestry sectors are low as compared to those of other sectors (industry, etc.). Moreover, these markets do not fully recognize all activities that are conducive to carbon sequestration in agricultural soils, particularly in drylands. Carbon markets have so far been focused on checking amounts of carbon sequestered, whereas it would be much easier, and verifiable, to directly promote recognized ‘carbon sequestering’ practices. Such a market could provide much more efficient operational leverage for modifying agricultural practices and setting up systems to protect soils in dryland regions.” The pdf version of the report is freely accessible here: http://www.csf-desertification.eu/dossier/item/carbon-in-dryland-soils-dossier
The French version (published in 2013) is still available here:http://www.csf-desertification.org/dossier/item/dossier-carbone-sols-zones-seches
Best regards, Martial
Français:
Le Comité Scientifique Français de la Désertification vient de publier la version anglaise de son dossier thématique sur le carbonde dans les sols des zones sèches: “Le carbone organique des sols (COS) joue un rôle fondamental dans le comportement des sols et des agroécosystèmes. Augmenter sa teneur améliore la qualité et la fertilité des sols contribuant à la résilience et à la durabilité de l’agriculture et, donc, à la sécurité alimentaire des sociétés. De plus, les sols représentent le plus grand réservoir de carbone en interaction avec l’atmosphère. Les systèmes agricoles et forestiers qui réduisent les concentrations en carbone atmosphérique en le piégeant dans les biomasses et dans la matière organique du sol, sont des puits de carbone. La lutte contre la désertification permet de séquestrer du carbone dans les sols et donc d’atténuer le changement climatique, en plus de contribuer à une gestion agronomique durable.
Depuis peu, les sols sont au cœur des débats internationaux, notamment dans le cadre des trois conventions internationales sur l’environnement. Elles ont des préoccupations liées entre elles, notamment dans les régions sèches : désertification, changement climatique et perte de biodiversité. Pourtant, des politiques concrètes concernant le carbone dans ces régions peinent à se mettre en place. Il manque notamment une meilleure prise en compte de l’impact des activités agricoles, pastorales et forestières sur le cycle du carbone.
Dans l’actuel système des marchés du carbone, les secteurs agricoles et forestiers restent faibles face aux autres secteurs (industrie, etc.). De plus, ces marchés ne reconnaissent pas pleinement les activités qui favorisent la séquestration de carbone dans les sols agricoles, notamment dans les zones sèches. Les marchés se sont jusqu’à présent focalisés sur la vérification de la quantité de carbone séquestrée, alors qu’il serait beaucoup plus simple et vérifiable de promouvoir directement des pratiques reconnues comme « séquestrantes ». Un tel marché pourrait constituer un levier opérationnel beaucoup plus efficace pour modifier les pratiques agricoles et mettre en place une protection des sols des régions sèches. La version anglaise est disponible ici: http://www.csf-desertification.eu/dossier/item/carbon-in-dryland-soils-dossier
La version française publiée en 2013 est toujours disponible: http://www.csf-desertification.org/dossier/item/dossier-carbone-sols-zones-seches
Bien cordialement Martial

Martial BERNOUX
Institut de Recherche pour le Développement – IRD
UMR Eco&Sols (Montpellier SupAgro-Cirad-INRA-IRD)
Functional Ecology&  Biogeochemistry of Soils&  Agro-ecosystems
Bâtiment 12 – 2 place Viala
34060 Montpellier cedex 2
Ligne directe: +33(0)4.99.61.21.08
Secrétariat Laboratoire:+33(0)4.99.61.21.01
Fax: +33(0)4.99.61.21.37
martial.bernoux@ird.fr<mailto:martial.bernoux@ird.fr>
http://www.montpellier.inra.fr/ecosols
http://www.ird.fr
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 http://worldviewmission.nl/?page_id=2764

 

http://globalsoilweek.org/

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Towards Resilient Water Organizati​on Trust:  Agricultur​e in a Changing Climate Scenario – Building Response Capacity of Small-Hold​er Producers

 

Dear colleagues,

Watershed Organisation Trust is pleased to announce the release of its position paper – Towards Resilient Agriculture in a Changing Climate Scenario – Building Response Capacity of Small-Holder Producers.

The publication is a part of a series of 12 position papers being formulated by the organization as it works towards catalyzing insights, learnings and experiences from multiple stakeholders involved in its Climate Change Adaptation project.  Apart from papers on Food & Nutrition Security,  Biodiversity  and Energythat are already available on our website, the series would eventually cover the sectors of Watershed Development, Water,  Livestock, Disaster Risk Reduction and Risk Prevention, Economics and Livelihoods, Health , Gender and Governance.

 

The paper, “Towards Resilient Agriculture in a Changing Climate Scenario – Building Response Capacity of Small-Holder Producers”, captures the ground realities of small- holder farmers in rainfed Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh. It presents WOTR’s approach towards climate-resilient agriculture. The paper also suggests recommendations for policy that will help increase the response capacity of farmers. It also draws attention to the need of enhancing the resilience of the ecosystem so as to reduce risks posed by climate change..

We hope you find this interesting and please do not hesitate to contact us with your feedback and suggestions!

 

You can download Towards Resilient Agriculture in a Changing Climate Scenario [PDF 0.99 MB] <http://wotr.org/sites/default/files/WOTR Agriculture Position Paper.pdf>

 Warm regards

WOTR Team

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 Hello Blessed Spring Greetings..
MSB Global University GREEN Industrial Park close to largest Cattle Colony of the World Landhi Cattle Colony in Karachi is available for demonstration of ALL Renewable Energy R&D and demonstration:
Kind Blessed Regards..
Mufaddal Mirza NKD, Ph.D. (UIUC-USA)
+92-333-228-3257
12 Faisal Arcade, A-39, Block 7&8, KCHSU
Shahrah e Faisal, Karachi 75350
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Liberian President and Italian Vice-Minister join high-level meeting of FAO, IFAD, WFP.

ROME, 4 April 2014 — The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the World Food Programme (WFP) unveiled today the results of their joint work to develop targets and indicators for a new global development paradigm for sustainable agriculture, food security and nutrition. This is a critical piece in the three agencies’ contribution to the ongoing intergovernmental discussions on the post-2015 development agenda, the successor framework to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).Download Targets and Indicators document

The targets and indicators were presented at a high-level meeting at WFP headquarters, where the President of the Republic of Liberia, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, was guest of honour. The Italian Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lapo Pistelli also attended the meeting.

Representatives from the three agencies stressed the need to finish the job of the MDGs that expire in 2015, but also to broaden their scope to address deeper issues of universal relevance like malnutrition, sustainable and inclusive food systems, and their inter-linkages. The three agencies identified a list of five targets:

•    Access to adequate food all year round for all people.
•    End malnutrition in all its forms with special attention to stunting.
•    Make all food production systems more productive, sustainable, resilient and efficient.
•    Secure access for all small food producers, especially women, to adequate inputs, knowledge, productive resources and services.
•    More efficient post-production food systems that reduce the global rate of food loss and waste by 50 percent.

The UN Rome-based agencies emphasized that progress in these areas would have to come through innovative partnerships – among governments, with the private sector, with development institutions, and with all members of society, from producers to consumers. New governance mechanisms would also be needed to monitor impact, ensure accountability, and give different stakeholders a voice in decision-making. Attention was drawn to the important role in global food security of small-scale food producers, who need to be at the centre of new investments and new partnerships for a hunger-free world.

“The overarching priority of the post-2015 development agenda is the eradication of poverty in all its forms,” said President of Liberia, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, who is co-Chair of the High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the post-2015 development agenda. “The Common African Position drawing from the African Union’s 2063 long-term agenda is a resolve to deliver on our various declarations and commitments on the social and economic integration, poverty eradication, and employment generation for our people. It aims to reorient the development paradigm away from externally-driven initiatives toward domestically-inspired and funded initiatives.”

The new targets are in line with the UN Secretary-General’s Zero Hunger Challenge, which envisions a world where, within our lifetime, no-one experiences chronic hunger and malnutrition. The work of the three Rome-based agencies has been consistently inspired by this shared vision.

FAO Deputy Director-General for Natural Resources, Maria Helena Semedo, stated that the targets would inform UN Member States currently negotiating a set of sustainable development goals. “There can be no sustainable development without eradicating hunger,” she said. “We believe that incorporating these five targets in the post-2015 development agenda will ensure a more comprehensive approach to tackling hunger,food insecuritymalnutrition – to nourishing people while nurturing the planet,” she noted.

Highlighting the collaboration of the UN agencies IFAD President Kanayo F. Nwanze said: “A future of ‘zero hunger’ will not be built by any one organization in isolation. We know that we are stronger and more effective when we work in partnership, including with the billions of rural women and men who work hard each day to ensure our food security.”

“Food security and nutrition play a critical role in shaping a brighter tomorrow for today’s most vulnerable families particularly the children.  Eliminating hunger unlocks the potential of individuals, communities and nations,” said WFP Executive Director, Ertharin Cousin.  “Achieving these goals will require hardwiring equity into economic growth assuring no one is left behind.”

The three UN agencies stressed that successes associated with the MDGs have been substantial in some areas, such as halving the number of people living in extreme poverty, dramatically increasing the number of people with access to safe drinking water as well as boosting primary school enrolment.

But the agencies emphasized that gains were by no means universal and much work still needed to be done given that around 840 million people remain chronically hungry and that poverty continues to be pervasive in rural areas around the world.

The new development goals to be set by the UN General Assembly in 2015 should therefore be a catalyst towards the realization of the right to adequate food, improved nutrition, gender equality, focus on smallholders and sustainable and resilient food systems.

For more information, please contact:

Katie Taft

IFAD Communications
Tel: +39 366 5620976
k.taft@ifad.org
Erwin Northoff

FAO Media Relations
Tel +39 06 570 53105
Mob +39348 25 23 616
erwin.northoff@fao.org
Frances Kennedy

WFP Spokesperson
Tel: +39 06 65133725
Mob + 39 346 7600806
Frances.Kennedy@wfp.org

http://www.wfp.org/news/news-release/un-rome-based-agencies-reveal-food-security-and-nutrition-targets-post-2015-agenda?utm_source=PHL+in+the+News&utm_campaign=db46b43a53-PHLITN_April_11_20144_9_2014&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_fd863700b4-db46

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Dear All,Liberian President and Italian Vice-Minister join high-level meeting
of FAO, IFAD, WFPPhoto: ©FAO/©FAO/Paballo Thekiso
Small-scale farmers need to be at the centre of new investments and
new partnerships for a hunger-free world.
4 April 2014, Rome – The United Nations Food and Agriculture
Organization (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural
Development (IFAD) and the World Food Programme (WFP) unveiled today
the results of their joint work to develop targets and indicators for
a new global development paradigm for sustainable agriculture, food
security and nutrition.This is a critical piece in the three agencies’ contribution to the
ongoing intergovernmental discussions on the post-2015 development
agenda, the successor framework to the Millennium Development Goals
(MDGs).The targets and indicators were presented at a high-level meeting at
WFP headquarters, where the President of the Republic of Liberia,
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, was guest of honour. The Italian Vice Minister
of Foreign Affairs, Lapo Pistelli also attended the meeting.Representatives from the three agencies stressed the need to finish
the job of the MDGs that expire in 2015, but also to broaden their
scope to address deeper issues of universal relevance like
malnutrition, sustainable and inclusive food systems, and their
inter-linkages. The three agencies identified a list of five targets:Access to adequate food all year round for all people.
End malnutrition in all its forms with special attention to stunting.
Make all food production systems more productive, sustainable,
resilient and efficient.
Secure access for all small food producers, especially women, to
adequate inputs, knowledge, productive resources and services.
More efficient post-production food systems that reduce the global
rate of food loss and waste by 50 percent.
The UN Rome-based agencies emphasized that progress in these areas
would have to come through innovative partnerships – among
governments, with the private sector, with development institutions,
and with all members of society, from producers to consumers.New governance mechanisms would also be needed to monitor impact,
ensure accountability, and give different stakeholders a voice in
decision-making. Attention was drawn to the important role in global
food security of small-scale food producers, who need to be at the
centre of new investments and new partnerships for a hunger-free
world.”The overarching priority of the post-2015 development agenda is the
eradication of poverty in all its forms,” said President of Liberia,
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Co-Chair of the High-Level Panel of Eminent
Persons on the post-2015 development agenda.”The Common African Position drawing from the African Union’s 2063
long-term agenda is a resolve to deliver on our various declarations
and commitments on the social and economic integration, poverty
eradication, and employment generation for our people. It aims to
reorient the development paradigm away from externally-driven
initiatives toward domestically-inspired and funded initiatives.”Zero HungerThe new targets are in line with the UN Secretary-General’s Zero
Hunger Challenge, which envisions a world where, within our lifetime,
no-one experiences chronic hunger and malnutrition. The work of the
three Rome-based agencies has been consistently inspired by this
shared vision.

FAO Deputy Director-General for Natural Resources, Maria Helena
Semedo, stated that the targets would inform UN Member States
currently negotiating a set of sustainable development goals.

“There can be no sustainable development without eradicating hunger,”
she said. “We believe that incorporating these five targets in the
post-2015 development agenda will ensure a more comprehensive approach
to tackling hunger, food insecurity, malnutrition – to nourishing
people while nurturing the planet,” she noted.

Highlighting the collaboration of the UN agencies IFAD President
Kanayo F. Nwanze said: “A future of ‘zero hunger’ will not be built by
any one organization in isolation. We know that we are stronger and
more effective when we work in partnership, including with the
billions of rural women and men who work hard each day to ensure our
food security.”

“Food security and nutrition play a critical role in shaping a
brighter tomorrow for today’s most vulnerable families particularly
the children. Eliminating hunger unlocks the potential of individuals,
communities and nations,” said WFP Executive Director, Ertharin
Cousin. “Achieving these goals will require hardwiring equity into
economic growth assuring no one is left behind.”

The three UN agencies stressed that successes associated with the MDGs
have been substantial in some areas, such as halving the number of
people living in extreme poverty, dramatically increasing the number
of people with access to safe drinking water as well as boosting
primary school enrolment.

But the agencies emphasized that gains were by no means universal and
much work still needed to be done given that around 840 million people
remain chronically hungry and that poverty continues to be pervasive
in rural areas around the world.

The new development goals to be set by the UN General Assembly in 2015
should therefore be a catalyst towards the realization of the right to
adequate food, improved nutrition, gender equality, focus on
smallholders and sustainable and resilient food systems.

http://www.fao.org/news/story/en/item/219078/icode/

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Dear Colleagues,
 
GGCA member FAO is hosting a 45 minute 
webinar focusing on Carbon sink capacity of fruit orchards managed with sustainable practices 
on Tuesday 15 April 2014 at 14:30 (UTC+2).  
Details are below if you are interested.  The seats are filled on first come, first serve basis.  
To join the webinar on the day of the event, go to:
All the best,
Pam
Co-Coordinator Climate Change
 
__________________ Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell:  (734) 330-0238
Voice/Fax: (734) 994-3612

===========

Webinar on agroforestry and carbon
FAO welcomes members of the Community of practice for Climate Change Mitigation in Agriculture interested in Carbon sink capacity of fruit orchards managed with sustainable practices to join a webinar on Tuesday 15 April, 2014 at 14:30 (UTC+2).
We’ll have first 30 minutes for technical set up. The webinar lasts for 45 minutes, and starts at 15hrs. The seats are filled on first come, first serve basis. Thanks for coming in early!
After the short presentation, members can ask questions. The facilitator helps to realize a structured discussion on the topic of the presentation.
Member’s biography
Angela Fiore is an industrial engineer, expert in environmental management of productive processes and Life Cycle Assessment. She is a PhD candidate in Crop Bioecosystems at the University of Basilicata (Italy) where she is developing a research study on the carbon footprint of fruit tree crops in the Mediterranean area: sustainability certification of production chains and access to voluntary carbon market. At present she´s working at the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) in Müncheberg, Germany.
MICCA Talks webinars are only for members of the community of practice. Therefore, please do not share the link that you to attend the webinar. Kindly take note that this webinar is not part of the Climate-Smart Agriculture learning event taking place in May 2014, and is not advertised on our web site.
Getting to know the webinar platform
Please note that this webinar allows our members to get familiarize themselves with the use of microphone and other functions of Adobe Connect web conferencing platform. Kindly log in 30 minutes prior to the start of the webinar for a brief introduction and a technical set up.
Check before the webinar:

1.      Well in advance: run the four-step diagnostic on your computer. The diagnostic will verify that you have everything you need to run Adobe Connect. http://fao.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

2.      If needed: Download the appropriate software into your PC from http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/  and restart the computer

3.      On the day of the event: Close other programmes using internet connection

4.      Use Internet Explorer, Safari or Google Chrome, as your browser, some functionalities of the programme may not work with other browsers (more info here).

5.      Have your headsets with microphone attached

6.      Join the webinar, click on: http://fao.adobeconnect.com/micca_gender_csa_webinar3/

7.      Log in as a “Guest” just typing your full name. (You may need to accept the terms and conditions of the programme in the first entry.)

For any questions during the webinar, don’t hesitate to contact Claudia:
Skype: Claudia.garcia.ayala
Telephone: +39.06.57056408
Kind regards,
Maria Nuutinen and Claudia Garcia
Facilitators of the Community of Practice for Climate Change Mitigation in Agriculture
Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture Programme, FAO
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Dear Colleague,
FAO welcomes everyone interested in climate-smart agriculture and equity to join the online learning event. The event takes place from 30/1 to 18/2 2014.
Online learning event  Gender and Climate-Smart Agriculture  Webinars: 1) Thursday 30 January; 2) Wednesday 5 February; and 3) Tuesday 18 February 2014 
The event consists of 3 webinars of 90 minutes, combined with online discussions on the linkages between gender, agriculture and climate change. The event is organized within the Community of Practice for Climate Change Mitigation in Agriculture of the MICCA Programme in collaboration with colleagues and partners. Enrolled participants will receive invitations to the webinars and more details prior to the event.
2 weeks to have a look at the recommended background reading
Training Guide for Gender and Climate Change Research in Agriculture and Food Security for Rural Development (available in EnglishFrench and Spanish) bit.ly/1aNC58R
Thank you for sharing this invitation with your networks!
PS. Please spread the word by sharing this email, through LinkedIn or tweeting. Here’s our proposal for a social media message:
“Join Gender and Climate-Smart Agriculture online learning event 30/1–18/2 2014
– Enrol today bit.ly/1gj8AUs to webinars and online discussions @FAOclimate”
Kind regards,
Maria, Claudia and Sibyl
Maria Nuutinen & Claudia Garcia
MICCA Programme
Sibyl Nelson
Gender Officer
Cross-cutting theme on gender, FAO

 

 

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Climate change and the risks of global food system collapse

 

Globalized diet: More food, less diversity, more associated risks

As experts have been suspecting for a while, and as many of us have certainly noticed, people’s diets around the world have become very similar. So much so that in the past 50 years the whole world has come to rely increasingly on just a few crops for most of its food supplies – including old favorites such as wheat, rice, maize, and potato but also more recent ones like soybean, sunflower oil and palm oil – along with meat and dairy products. Many local crops that used to be important in Africa or Asia such as sorghum, millet, rye, sweet potato, cassava, and yam are failing to keep up.

While we generally eat more calories, protein and fat than 50 years ago, the lack of diversity in such a “standard globalized diet” may deprive us from the micronutrients our body needs. It may also increase the occurrence of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes, even in countries that are struggling to make enough food available to their people.

The other danger of relying upon just a few crops is that this makes agriculture and the global food system more vulnerable, and increases the risk of food crisis. Similar to the concept of portfolio diversification in finance, a diversified agriculture is more resilient to major threats like drought, insect pests, and diseases, all expected to worsen with climate change.

Read the full post and access the study by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and the Global Crop Diversity Trust

athttp://www.ciatnews.cgiar.org/2014/03/03/globalized-diet-more-food-less-diversity-more-associated-risks/

 

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http://www.ais.unwater.org/pro/?q=node/1733  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PwfuNqQk9h0&list=UUvtCtVKTdDBqUBVJrX2wYOQ#t=125

 

World Wetlands Day 2014: Christopher Brigg’s Statement

 

 

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 NELSON MANDELA

Today, we stand united with people in South Africa and around the world in mourning the loss of President Nelson Mandela.

President Mandela was a champion against injustice and a true ally in the fight against hunger. His concern was always for the most vulnerable and disadvantaged people in the world, and his words and actions were a motivational force for all of us here at WFP.

In President Mandela’s own words:

Hunger is an issue of social justice and not economics. Our economic approach to food and its distribution reflects our basic moral values. There are relatively poor countries where almost everyone is reasonably fed and richer ones where there is widespread malnutrition. The economic systems in these countries vary. Those who have succeeded have done so because they have made it a priority to end it. Hunger is a moral issue.

WFP has more than 13,000 staff in more than 80 countries who work every day to bring nutritious food to those who are hungry. And we have more than 1.2 million supporters like you who help make that possible.

Together, let’s honour the memory of President Mandela by continuing to carry out our mission of ending hunger, wherever it is found.

To read about one example of the great work President Mandela has inspired, click here . http://www.wfp.org/node/3504/3795/622680

Thank you.

 

The World Food Programme (WFP) fights hunger worldwide, saving lives during emergencies while building a better future for the next generation. WFP is funded solely by voluntary donations.

World Food Programme wfp.org | Contact us | Privacy | Unsubscribe

Via C.G.Viola 68

 

 

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(Spanish version   below/ Versión en español a continuación)

Resilient food systems underpin food security.   Climate variability and change can disrupt key elements of food systems,  affecting the availability of food as well as people’s ability to access and utilize   it. Whether it is a household suffering subsistence crop loss due to drought   or a district being cut off from food markets due to flood-damaged infrastructure, these disruptions can increase the risk of hunger,   malnutrition and poverty.

To better understand the complex relationship between food systems, food security and climate change, IISD, in partnership with ISETACF-ECURLAUCA and Nitlapán, recently released a conceptual framework for assessing, planning and monitoring   climate resilience and food security at the community, regional and national   levels. This framework is presented in the working paper, Climate Resilience and Food  Security: A framework for planning and monitoring.

The framework was developed through the Climate Resilience and   Food Security in Central America (CREFSCA) project funded by   the Climate and Development Knowledge Network. The project aims to strengthen   the long-term food security of vulnerable populations in Guatemala, Honduras   and Nicaragua by improving the climate resilience of food systems at  different spatial and temporal scales. Based on the conceptual framework,  tools are currently being developed to guide communities and policy-makers in   developing their own practical indicators of climate resilience and using them to evaluate the impact of policies on food system resilience.

CREFSCA is part of IISD’s Adaptation and Risk Reduction program,   which seeks to help decision makers respond effectively to the impacts of   climate change on people, economies and the environment.

  

Los sistemas alimentarios resilientes fortalecen la seguridad alimentaria. Sin embargo,   tanto la variabilidad climática como el cambio climático pueden alterar importantes elementos dentro de estos sistemas, por ende afectando la   disponibilidad de los alimentos. Por otra parte, los hogares también ven   afectada su capacidad de acceso y consumo de alimentos. Ya sea que una familia sufra la pérdida de sus cultivos debido a la sequía, o que cierta población no pueda ir a comprar alimentos a los mercados locales porque cierta infraestructura haya sido dañada por inundaciones, estas interrupciones pueden aumentar riesgos tales como el hambre, la mala alimentación y la   pobreza.

Para tener un mejor entendimiento de la compleja relación entre los sistemas alimentarios, la   seguridad alimentaria y el cambio climático, el IISD, en colaboración con ISETACF-E,CURLAUCA y Nitlapán, publicó recientemente un marco conceptual para la evaluación, planificación y   monitoreo de la resiliencia climática y la seguridad alimentaria a nivel comunitario, regional y nacional. Este marco se presenta en el documento de   trabajo denominado Resiliencia Climática y Seguridad Alimentaria: Un marco para la   planificación y el monitoreo.

Este marco fue desarrollado como parte del proyecto de Resiliencia Climática y Seguridad Alimentaria en Centroamérica (CREFSCA,  por sus siglas en inglés), el cual es financiado por la Alianza Clima y   Desarrollo (CDKN, por sus siglas en inglés). El objetivo de esta iniciativa   es fortalecer a largo plazo la seguridad alimentaria de poblaciones vulnerables en Guatemala, Honduras y Nicaragua. Para esto, el proyecto busca mejorar la resiliencia climática de los sistemas alimentarios en distintas escalas espaciales y temporales.

Partiendo de este marco conceptual, actualmente se están creando herramientas para guiar tanto   a las comunidades como a los tomadores de decisiones en el desarrollo de sus   propios indicadores prácticos de resiliencia climática. Se espera que estas herramientas sean utilizadas para evaluar el impacto de políticas públicas relacionadas con la resiliencia de los sistemas alimentarios.

CREFSCA forma parte   del programa de Adaptación y Reducción de Riesgo del  IISD, el cual tiene como objetivo apoyar a tomadores de decisiones para que   implementen políticas públicas que respondan de manera eficaz al impacto que  el cambio climático tiene en las personas, la economía y el medio ambiente.

 

Daniella Echeverría

Research Assistant – Climate Change and Energy

Phone: +1 (204) 958 7739 | Email: decheverria@iisd.ca | Skype: daniellaiisd

International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) 161 Portage Avenue East, 6th Floor  Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R3B 0Y4  www.iisd.org

 

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Invitation Renewable energy market South Africa 24 June 2013

https://www.evite-sendmail.nl/agent_nl/z_afr_13/web/z_afr_13_aanmelden_zndr_uit.php

 

 

 

http://www.agentschapnl.nl/en

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What : Renewable energy market South Africa
When : 24 june 2013, 13.45 – 17.45
Where : NL Agency, The Hague                                           Prinses Beatrixlaan 2, 2595 AL, Den Haag
Register : Before 21 June 2013 by clicking this link
Costs: none
Organisation : NL Agency commissioned by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Contact : NL Agency                                          -                                           Events department evenementen@info.agentschapnl.nl                                           phone number: 088-602 8399

 

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Mr. Arthur Sessink

 

Advisor International Organizations 

 

The Dutch  EVD International Ministry of  Foreign Affairs

 

Prinses Beatrixlaan 2 | 2595 AL | Den Haag Postbus 20105 | 2500 EC | Den Haag 

Phone-   +31 (0) 88 602 80 60

http://www.fao.org/gender/en/

 

http://www.unep.org/

 

http://www.barillacfn.com/

 

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Genderclimatesmartagriculture

 

    • EUROPEAN BANK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16 October 2013 World Food Day

 

 

 

 

 

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IISD RS will be providing a summary report of the meeting, which will be available at
http://www.iisd.ca/csd/escwa/                                             Sunday, 2 June 2013

Langston James “Kimo” Goree VI Vice President, Reporting Services and United Nations Liaison International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) — United Nations Office 300 E 56th St. Apt. 11D – New York, NY 10022  USA Direct Line: +1 973 273 5860  / Email: kimo@iisd.org

Mobile phone (new!): +12128107701  /  Skype: kimogoree

Where: NYC through mid-June, 17-21 June Winnipeg, 22-30 Montana (cycling)

Notice: This email and any attachments may contain information that is personal, confidential, legally privileged and/or copyright. No part of it should be reproduced, adapted or communicated without the prior written consent of the author.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • EUROPEAN  UNION (EU) Women in economic decision making in the EU A Europe 2020 initiative.

 

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UN activity’s THE WEEK AHEAD AT THE UNITED NATIONS

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*Worldview Mission  is Standing Up ,* Taking Action* , **Making Noise for the United Nations MDGL’s !!!**

 

http://www.action2015.org/                    http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/

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