Gender / Women

Unite to End Violence against women

 

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http://worldviewmission.nl/?page_id=74

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http://worldviewmission.nl/?page_id=20848

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 http://worldviewmission.nl/?page_id=9687

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http://worldviewmission.nl/?page_id=9687

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http://worldviewmission.nl/?page_id=5991

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WM USA White House Gov

WM-2015-Action-logo_crisp

WM Michelle Obama Women

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http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2015/02/20/honoring-women-civil-rights-movement-both-past-and-present

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Pics Queen NL Maxima

Queen Maxima Speaches

https://www.google.nl/?gws_rd=ssl#q=maxima+speaches

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http://worldviewmission.nl/?page_id=16080

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http://www.worldwewant2015.org/civilsociety2015

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http://www.un.org/en/events/observances/days.shtml

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mama sarah obama photo

Mama Sara Obama

Mama Sarah Obama Honored at UN Women’s Entrepreneurship Day

http://www.voanews.com/content/mama-sarah-obama-honored-at-un-women-entrepreneurship-day/2528823.html

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Michelle Obama and Maya Angelou

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewvcTjTejZ4

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PXdacSqvcA

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http://dreamz-newz.com/maya-angelou-overleden/

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Christine Lagarde TimeChristine Lagarde

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http://world.time.com/2013/03/28/the-imfs-christine-lagarde-can-she-fix-europe/

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http://www.economist.com/blogs/newsbook/2011/05/who_christine_lagarde

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http://www.britannica.com/biography/Christine-Lagarde

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http://www.infoplease.com/biography/var/christinelagarde.html

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Young Women Aspire to Change the World at Clinton Global Initiative University

 

Chelsea Clinton pics

Ms. Chelsea Clinton

BIO

https://www.clintonfoundation.org/blog/authors/chelsea-clinton

https://www.clintonfoundation.org/blog/2015/03/30/young-women-aspire-change-world-clinton-global-initiative-university

   

  Clinton Foundation report

 

include this link: http://noceilings.org/about/?utm_source=20150309DataReportHRC&utm_medium=email&utm_term=returning&utm_content=20150309&utm_campaign=NoCeilings#!

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[WGC Advocacy] Group analysis on gender and adaptation + loss and damage in Co-Chairs’ tool

 

From: Marta Benavides <tlalibertad@gmail.com>
Subject: Fwd: [WGC Advocacy] Group analysis on gender and adaptation + loss and damage in Co-Chairs’ tool
Date: September 2, 2015  DT
To: Pamela Puntenney <pjpunt@umich.edu>

SALUDOS PAM.. LOVE..MARTA

From: Fanny Petitbon <petitbon@carefrance.org>
Date: Mon, Aug 31, 2015
Subject: [WGC Advocacy] Group analysis on gender and adaptation + loss and damage in Co-Chairs’ tool
To: wgc_advocacy@googlegroups.com
Dear WGC colleagues,
Please find attached the document we started working on this morning in small group. We went back to the key WGC recommendations’ document from June 1st and looked at the placement of supportive language in the Co-Chairs’ tool.
We share it with you to get your feedback but hope this will be a good basis for our advocacy work.
Good night
Fanny (in behalf of the Adaptation and L&D group)
Fanny PETITBON  |  CARE France  |  Chargée de mission Plaidoyer/ Advocacy Officer

71 rue Archereau, 75019 Paris | www.carefrance.org  |

Ligne directe/Direct line: +33.1.53.19.89.83 | Fax: +33.1.53.19.89.90

Email : petitbon@carefrance.org  Skype ID: fanny133002

Kopie van WGC_Adaptation_L&D WG Analysis

 ck our work at web sites..***web del MUSEO AJA LINK: http://www.museoaja.org

The wikipedia page for SIGLO XXIII is up. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siglo_XXIII,
The museo aha is already on Wikipedia as well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Museo_Aja, in spanish: http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Museo_Aja.marta benavides– SIGLO XXIII   EL SALVADOR — TEL 503-7904-9886

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The World’s Women 2015 – Trends & Statistics

SALUD..PLS SHARE W YOUR PARTNERS AND NETWORKS.. LOVE..MARTA

From: WUNRN LISTSERVE <WUNRN_LISTSERVE@lists.wunrn.com>
Date: Tue, Jan 26, 2016
Subject: [WUNRN] The World’s Women 2015 – Trends & Statistics
To: WUNRN ListServe <wunrn_listserve@lists.wunrn.com>
WUNRN

http://www.wunrn.com

http://unstats.un.org/unsd/gender/aboutWW2015.html

The World’s Women 2015 – Trends & Statistics

 

DOWNLOAD BY CHAPTERS

http://unstats.un.org/unsd/gender/worldswomen.html

 

CLICK ABOVE LINK TO THEN CLICK TO OPEN INDIVIDUAL CHAPTERS

Chapter 1 – Population and families   

Chapter 2 – Health

Chapter 3 – Education

Chapter 4 – Work

Chapter 5 – Power and decision-making

Chapter 6 – Violence against women

Chapter 7 – Environment

Chapter 8 – Poverty

Moving forward on gender statistics

 

At the 1995 United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women, Governments adopted the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which “seeks to promote and protect the full enjoyment of all human rights and the fundamental freedoms of all women throughout their life cycle.” Guided by these principles, the World’s Women 2015: Trends and Statistics presents the latest statistics and analyses of the status of women and men in areas of concern identified by the Platform for Action. It also reviews progress towards gender equality over the past 20 years. The publication is the sixth edition in a series.

 

The World’s Women 2015 comprises eight chapters covering critical areas of policy concern: population and families, health, education, work, power and decision-making, violence against women, environment, and poverty. In each area, a life-cycle approach is introduced to reveal the experiences of women and men during different periods of life—from childhood and the formative years, through the working and reproductive stages, to older ages.

The statistics and analyses presented in the following pages are based on a comprehensive and careful assessment of a large set of available data from international and national statistical agencies. Each chapter provides an assessment of gaps in gender statistics, highlighting progress in the availability of statistics, new and emerging methodological developments, and areas demanding further attention from the international community. In addition to the data presented in the chapters, a wide selection of statistics and indicators at the global, regional and country levels can be found in the Statistical Annex of this report.

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Protecting the Planet: Mary Robinson Foundation – Climate Justice — Transformative Leadership

Dear Friends and Colleagues,
The Mary Robinson Foundation step-up incorporating the principles of intergenerational equity into significant international processes.  To learn more visit:
To view the videos:
Kofi Annan
Mary Robinson
Marvin Nala, Youth activist Greenpeace China
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UNSD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change
__________________
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
Cell: +1-(734) 352•7429
Landline: +1-(734) 994•3612
 Mary Robson Foundation
The Mary Robinson Foundation – Climate Justice (MRFCJ) is a centre for thought leadership, education and advocacy on the struggle to secure global justice for those people vulnerable to the impacts of climate change who are usually forgotten – the poor, the disempowered and the marginalised across the world…read more

Celebrating International Youth Day 2015

AUGUST  12, 2015
Mary Robinson and Kofi Anan

Kofi Annan: “We cannot keep consuming as if there’s no tomorrow”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqApGtOGZgM

Mary Robinson and Kofi Annan take a selfie with particpants after The Elders climate change session at the One Young World Summit 2014. (Photo: The Elders)

Incorporating the principles of intergenerational equity into significant international processes in 2015 is crucial.

Growing inequality, extreme poverty and the threat of climate change bring into focus the fact that the actions (or inactions) of the present generation can jeopardise the rights and wellbeing of generations yet to be born. This should hasten the need for responses that enhance equity between generations.

Young people and future generations matter. They hold a legitimate interest in the outcome of ongoing negotiations in both the climate and development processes. Their concerns extend beyond the lifetimes of the people setting international policies and yet those policies will ultimately determine whether the world in which they live out their lives offers opportunities in terms of quality of life, personal safety and equity.

Incorporating the principles of intergenerational equity into two significant international processes taking shape in 2015, the new climate agreement and the Post-2015 Development Agenda, requires an approach that considers a combination of strategies – some specific to these processes individually, and some to enhance the standing of intergenerational  equity more broadly within international dialogue:

  • Establishment of a Commission or Commissioner for Future Generations at an International Level
  • Strengthening Youth Participation in both processes
  • Incorporation of Intergenerational Equity indicators into the Sustainable Development Goals
  • Incorporation of Intergenerational Equity into the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) equity review.

Our  generation is the first to really understand the impacts of climate change and we are the last who can address it before too much damage is done. Those of us who are alive today must recognise how much power we have over those who are yet to come and we must use that power equitably.


To mark the occasion of International Youth Day 2015, the Foundation published this position paper on intergenerational equity on 12 August 2015:

“Meeting the needs of Future Generations - Applying the principle of intergenerational equity to the 2015 processes on climate change and sustainable development” 


Find out more about intergenerational equity

  • Watch Mary Robinson discussing “climate justice” with the audience at the One Young World Summit 2014
  • Watch The Elders debate with young people on climate change issues: “How do you speak truth to power? (Mary Robinson and Kofi Annan)
  • Watch Marvin Nala, a youth activist with Greenpeace China, speak about climate justice:

Related Links

Read Prof Henry Shue’s essay on Sharing the Benefits and Burdens of Climate Change Equitably

One Young World Summit Celebrating Youth Leadership

The Effective Participation by Young People in Climate Policy Decision-Making is Vital for Climate Justice

 Climate Justice with Mary Robinson – The One Young World Summit 2014
What is a Climate Justice Narrative? Marvin Nala explains

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRlX2DB1_no

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[APWLD Publication] Climate Change and Natural Disaster Affecting Women, Peace and Security

 [APWLD Publication] Climate Change and Natural Disaster Affecting Women, Peace and Security

Dear UNSD Education Caucus Colleagues,
From the Global Gender and Climate Alliance
A recent publication by APWLD may interest many of you.  Below, please find a description and direct link to the 10 page publication.
Kind regards,
Cara
Cara Beasley | Coordinator | Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA)
w: http://www.gender-climate.org
Climate Change & Natural Disasters Affecting Women, Peace & Security
BY APWLDADMIN · MARCH 17, 2015
Evidence connecting climate change to armed conflict is still evolving, but the implications of climate change for human and international security are clear. It is essential that we recognise the connections as factors affecting women, peace and security. Impacts of climate change, such as drought, floods, extreme weather events and reduced food and water security, affect women and men differently with the poorest being the most vulnerable. In the Asia Pacific region, 2013 was marked by devastating disasters that made clear that it is no longer enough to merely mitigate and adapt to climate change: the loss and damage to lives, property, land and livelihood caused by climate change induced events affecting rural, indigenous, and urban poor women must be addressed. Climate change is not gender neutral and as extreme weather patterns increase global competition and tensions over land and resources, the disproportionate burden of climate change already borne by women can only be augmented as climate change induced conflict further threatens their lives, livelihoods, peace, and security.
Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law & Development – APWLD
Direct Link to Full 10-Page 2015 Publication:
 
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{Women_Major_Group} [WMG Press Release] Sustainable Development Agenda 2030 Presents a Bold Vision for Women and Girls: Advocates Gear Up for Work to Come

Sustainable Development Agenda 2030 Presents a Bold Vision for Women and Girls

Advocates Gear Up for Work to Come

 UNITED NATIONS—The Women’s Major Group, made up of more than 600 women’s organizations and networks from around the world, recognizes the historic agenda for global sustainable development that 193 governments agreed to on Sunday. At the center of this broad and ambitious plan are the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which will be formally adopted by Heads of State in September at the UN General Assembly. The SDGs chart out global development across social, environmental and economic areas for the next 15 years, and if fully implemented could be transformative for women and girls everywhere.

The Women’s Major Group has been actively participating in negotiations on the SDGs for the last several years, pushing for gender equality to be a priority and for a greater emphasis on human rights. The Women’s Major Group has also called for unequivocal action to transform global political and financial systems that disadvantage developing countries and cause economic, environmental and climate crises that disproportionately affect women. Unlike with the Millennium Development Goals—which expire this year—civil society groups have been actively involved in negotiations around developing this new global agenda, which is universal and involves all countries.

 The new global development agenda includes commitments to expand women’s economic opportunities; recognize and value the burdens of unpaid care work; eliminate gender disparities in schools; end discrimination and gender-based violence; eliminate child marriage and female genital mutilation; and ensure access to sexual and reproductive health care and women’s and girls’ reproductive rights, among other key actions. The Women’s Major Group was able to ensure that the political declaration for the new agenda contained language committing to realize human rights for all people.

Governments also committed to address a range of social, economic and environmental issues that impact women and girls, including economic inequality, agriculture, energy, biodiversity and climate change, and peace and security. “One key success of the SDGs is that many ‘environmental’ Goals recognize that they have a gender dimension,” said Sascha Gabizon, Women in Europe for a Common Future. “Indeed, women’s access to land, water, sanitation and energy are strongly defined in the targets of the 2030 Agenda,” commented Priscilla Achakpa of Women Environmental Programme.

 “The 2030 Agenda addresses climate change, which is already rolling back development gains and exacerbating gender inequalities,” said Eleanor Blomstrom of Women’s Environment and Development Organization. “We have a climate goal and a threshold for temperature rise, but it’s still not ambitious enough, for women and girls, and for the world, to tackle the drivers of climate change and launch a transformation toward energy sources that are not only sustainable but also safe and gender-responsive.”

There are several weaknesses to the plan, according to the Women’s Major Group. “The Agenda 2030 fails to address the concentration of wealth from a progressive redistribution approach, and therefore it addresses the symptoms of extreme poverty, while leaving aside its true causes: the fact that almost half of the wealth in the world is in the hands of 1% of the population, and, the fact that 60% of the value that circulates in the world is generated by women’s unpaid work. This means that due to a lack of rights, women subsidize the entire economy with their unpaid work. The 2030 Agenda does too little to rectify this injustice, missing a historical opportunity to make a shift towards a new macro-economic approach”,  said Emilia Reyes, from the gender organization “Equidad de Genero”.

 Further, Tessa Khan of the Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development stated that “to implement the SDGs, governments are relying on the extremely weak outcome of the recent Third International Conference on Financing for Development in Addis Ababa, so there is a huge shortfall in the financing necessary to bring the goals and targets to fruition.” She also argues that the new global agenda ultimately does not redress a deeply flawed and inequitable global economic system. “The agenda is not ambitious enough to shift the global trade, finance and taxation arrangements that entrench inequalities and have caused multiple global financial crises. Further, it puts the private sector at the center, despite its negative role in creating and profiting from many of the crises that we currently face,” according to Tessa Khan.

Isis Alvarez of Global Forest Coalition is greatly disappointed by the last-minute weakening of target on ‘Access and Benefit Sharing’ (Nagoya Protocol of the Convention on Biological Diversity), “this came completely unexpected, as this target hat not been submitted for technical proofing and thus was not part of the intergovernmental negotiation process. We can only suspect that such an un-transparent last minute change has been forced by a powerful county, and this might be the reason why to date, we have not received the latest and final version of the negotiated text of the Agenda 2030!”

 According to the Group, moving forward the next priority will be ensuring that the ambitious agenda is fully funded, countries develop effective plans and measurements of their progress, and governments are held accountable.

The success of sustainable development is closely linked to dedicated funding for women’s rights organizations and strong participation of women’s organizations both in implementation and monitoring processes at global, regional and national levels, says Nurgul Djanaeva of the Forum of Women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan “we call for institutional engagement of women from civil society organizations at all stages at all levels”.

 “The 2030 Agenda  is a major accomplishment and could be a major turning point for women and girls,” said Shannon Kowalski of the International Women’s Health Coalition. “But the commitments require action by governments at all levels, effective financing, and a continued role for women’s and feminist groups in planning and decision-making. Our work is just beginning.”

Contacts:

Eleanor Blomstrom, Women Environment Development Organisation, WEDO Eleanor (at) wedo.org  Tel:+1-212-973-0325

Shannon Kowalski, International Women’s Health Coalition, IWHC info (at) iwhc.org Tel:+1-212.979.8500

Tessa Kahn, Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development APWLD, apwld (at) apwld.org Tel:+ (66) 53 284527, 284856

Sascha Gabizon, WECF International, wecf (at) wecf.eu Tel: +31-30-2310300

Emilia Reyes, Equidad de Genero, emilia (at) equidad.org.mx

Priscila Achapka, Women Environment Program, info (at) wepnigeria.net  Tel: +234 09 2910878

Isis Alvarez, Global Forest Coalition, isis.alvarez (at) globalforestcoalition.org  Tel:  +595-21-663654

Nurgul Djanaeva, Forum of Women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan  janay (at) elcat.kg   Tel + 996-312- 32-36-38

 Notes:

Transforming our World – 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, United Nations website https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/negotiationsoutcome3

The role of the Women’s Major Group is to assure effective public participation of women’s non-governmental groups in UN policy processes on sustainable development and environmental matters, http://www.womenmajorgroup.org a role recognized by the United Nations. https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/majorgroups/women

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New CCAFS Gender Info Note Available for Download

Dear Colleagues,
This is just to let you know that the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) together with partners International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA), recently released an Info Note analyzing Uganda’s climate and development policies from a gender perspective. Feel free to explore the following resources:> Download Info NoteGender and Climate Change in Uganda: Effects of Policy and Institutional Frameworks
Read accompanying blogDoes Uganda sufficiently address gender inequalities in climate policies?
> Share on Twitter: Uganda’s #climate policies reviewed from a gender perspective. Download Brief:http://ow.ly/POWY6 @cgiarclimate @CIAT_ @IITA_CGIAR
 
Kind regards,

Cecilia Schubert 
 
Communications Officer 
CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) 
CCAFS Website I Facebook I Twitter 

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Updates from Women Deliver

Women deliver 2016

View this email in your browser.

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Deadline Extended to Apply for Media Scholarship to Attend the Women Deliver 2016 Conference View this email in your browser.

 

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Updates from Women Deliver

  View this email in your browser

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IUCN and the Global Canopy Programme launch gender and REDD+ feature on the REDD Desk knowledge sharing platform

          Dear Colleagues,

 
The Global Gender Office (GGO) of IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature), and the Global Canopy Programme (GCP), are pleased to announce a partnership to integrate gender into the REDD Desk platform—the largest online collaborative resource for REDD+ information, news and analysis. For the first time ever, there is now a comprehensive information source with tools and analysis on mainstreaming gender into REDD+ programming and policy.
 
Integrating gender considerations into REDD+ planning and implementation is a key issue for numerous countries. As a part of USAID’s Gender Equality for Climate Change Opportunities (GECCO) initiative, GGO has endeavored to create a space that supports institutions and REDD+ countries with continued gender and REDD+ resources, in order to expand the impact of effective methodologies, lessons learned, and best practices, as well as to identify key process opportunities for advocacy and technical support. As a unique user-friendly knowledge platform, the REDD Desk works to meet the needs of diverse stakeholders by centralizing and clarifying complex information related to REDD+. The new information on gender which has been added to the platform further enriches the REDD Desk’s broad array of tools, such as its REDD+ Encyclopaedia, its detailed overviews of national progress towards REDD+ readiness in 28 countries, its library of resources, and its cutting edge analysis on REDD+ Markets and Standards.
 
The gender information added to the REDD Desk site includes:
- A gender equality Encyclopaedia page
- Up to date information on gender equality added to country overviews
- Numerous resources on gender equality, which include the newest knowledge products and IUCN’s REDD+ Gender Roadmaps
 
With the aim to inform stakeholders, including governments, civil society, the private sector, and academia, about the state of play on REDD+ and to encourage South-South learning and exchange of information on various REDD+ relevant issues, efforts to integrate gender into the REDD Desk platform will continue in the coming months. Ultimately, this will raise awareness of gender and REDD+ issues and best practices, and will provide users with easy access to the most innovative information and knowledge products related to gender-responsive REDD+ responses and outcomes.
For more information about this work please visit the GGO website, the REDD Desk website, or the GCP website or contact Maggie Roth, GGO Communications Officer, at maggie.roth@iucn.org.

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Gender Update

Subject: [GGCA] GGCA at Bonn: UNFCCC Gender Workshop, Day 1
Greetings GGCA members,
This morning in Bonn the UNFCCC hosted the first of a two-day “In-session workshop on gender-responsive climate policy with a focus on mitigation action and technology development and transfer”.
The workshop was opened by Mr. Richard Kinley, Deputy Executive Secretary, UNFCCC. GGCA members Bridget Burns, WEDO and Lorena Aguilar, IUCN appeared in the first session as expert presenters and fielded questions to set the scene, providing a common understanding of terms and concepts in the context of gender responsive policy, particularly with regard to mitigation and technology development and transfer. Other workshop sessions focused on the importance and benefits of mainstreaming gender in mitigation action and technology development and transfer.
 Subject: [GGCA] GGCA at Bonn: UNFCCC Gender Workshop, Day 1
Greetings GGCA members,
This morning in Bonn the UNFCCC hosted the first of a two-day “In-session workshop on gender-responsive climate policy with a focus on mitigation action and technology development and transfer”.
The workshop was opened by Mr. Richard Kinley, Deputy Executive Secretary, UNFCCC. GGCA members Bridget Burns, WEDO and Lorena Aguilar, IUCN appeared in the first session as expert presenters and fielded questions to set the scene, providing a common understanding of terms and concepts in the context of gender responsive policy, particularly with regard to mitigation and technology development and transfer. Other workshop sessions focused on the importance and benefits of mainstreaming gender in mitigation action and technology development and transfer.
The recording of the first of a two-day “In-session workshop on gender-responsive climate policy with a focus on mitigation action and technology development and transfer” is now available at

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IUCN & GCP launch gender & REDD+ feature on the REDD Desk

Greetings,
Forwarding a message from our IUCN colleagues, below, regarding their new comprehensive information Gender and Climate Change toolkits!
Best,
Vicky
Vicky Markham | Network Development Officer (NDO) | Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA)
ROTH Maggie [mailto:Maggie.Roth@iucn.org]
Sent: Thursday, June 04, 2015
Subject: IUCN & GCP launch gender & REDD+ feature on the REDD Desk
Dear Colleagues,
We are pleased to share some exciting news with you—The Global Gender Office (GGO) of IUCN and the Global Canopy Programme (GCP), are pleased to announce that for the first time ever, there is now a comprehensive information source with tools and analysis on mainstreaming gender into REDD+ programming and policy. Working in partnership, GGO and GCP have integrated gender into the REDD Desk platform. Please find more details below.
We would appreciate if you would share this news with your networks and via social media.
Best,
Maggie
Maggie Roth
Communications Officer | Global Gender Office
International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)
1630 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20009
Email: maggie.roth@iucn.org | Phone: 1.202.304.6703 | Skype: mkroth11
+++++
IUCN and the Global Canopy Programme launch gender and REDD+ feature on the REDD Desk knowledge sharing platform
The Global Gender Office (GGO) of IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature), and the Global Canopy Programme (GCP), are pleased to announce a partnership to integrate gender into the REDD Desk platform—the largest online collaborative resource for REDD+ information, news and analysis. For the first time ever, there is now a comprehensive information source with tools and analysis on mainstreaming gender into REDD+ programming and policy.
Integrating gender considerations into REDD+ planning and implementation is a key issue for numerous countries. As a part of USAID’s Gender Equality for Climate Change Opportunities (GECCO) initiative, GGO has endeavored to create a space that supports institutions and REDD+ countries with continued gender and REDD+ resources, in order to expand the impact of effective methodologies, lessons learned, and best practices, as well as to identify key process opportunities for advocacy and technical support. As a unique user-friendly knowledge platform, the REDD Desk, works to meet the needs of diverse stakeholders by centralizing and clarifying complex information related to REDD+. The new information on gender which has been added to the platform further enriches the REDD Desk’s broad array of tools, such as its REDD+ Encyclopedia, its detailed overviews of national progress towards REDD+ readiness in 28 countries, its library of resources, and its cutting edge analysis on REDD+ Markets and Standards.
The gender information added to the REDD Desk site can be found here and includes:
  • A gender equality Encyclopedia page
  • Up-to-date information on gender equality added to each country overview
  • Numerous resources on gender equality, which include knowledge products and IUCN’s REDD+ Gender Roadmaps
With the aim to inform stakeholders, including governments, civil society, the private sector, and academia, about the state of play on REDD+ and to encourage South-South learning and exchange of information on various REDD+ relevant issues, efforts to integrate gender into the REDD Desk platform will continue in the coming months. Ultimately, this will raise awareness of gender and REDD+ issues and best practices, and will provide users with easy access to the most innovative information and knowledge products related to gender-responsive REDD+ responses and outcomes.
Lorena Aguilar, Senior Global Gender Adviser, IUCN, says, “In order for REDD+ to become a successful mechanism to combat climate change, and in order to provide real environmental benefits while protecting and promoting the rights of communities in tandem, gender-responsive standards and safeguards must be mainstreamed into the very core of REDD+ policies and programs. By integrating gender themes through the REDD Desk platform, we are leveraging advancements in women’s empowerment and gender equality to provide an array of support options for national, regional, and global REDD+ activities that can advance women’s empowerment and gender equality.”
Louisa Denier, Senior Manager for GCP’s policy projects, states, “GCP’s REDD Desk has over 13,000 unique visitors a month and is widely accessed by REDD+ practitioners worldwide. It’s a great platform through which important gender information such as this can effectively be disseminated.”
Interviews are available by request. For more information about this work please visit the GGO website, the REDD Desk website, or the GCP website or contact Maggie Roth, GGO Communications Officer, at maggie.roth@iucn.org.

# # #

This communication, together with any attachment, may contain confidential information and/or copyright material and is intended only for the person(s) to whom it is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient of this communication, you received it by error and you are asked to please delete it and promptly notify us. Any review, copying, use, disclosure or distribution of any part of this communication, unless duly authorized by or on behalf of IUCN, is strictly forbidden.

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 Don’t miss WFPG’s 20th Anniversary on June 10th!, 2015

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Women foreign Policy Group

  

WFG 20th-anniversaryinvitation-3

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Gender Environmental Education Action-based Learning

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to introduce new colleagues who have joined the UNEP Gender Team as from April this year. 

Mr. Victor Tsang recently started  his appointment with UNEP as a Programme Officer in the Gender and Social Safeguards Unit. He brings with him 7 years of experience in gender mainstreaming and programme management both in headquarters and in the field. Mr. Tsang was with the World Food Programme (WFP) in Rome prior to joining UNEP. During his tenure with WFP from 2011 to 2015, he contributed to strengthen gender mainstreaming  throughout the programme cycle. He was particularly well known for his work in developing outcome-level gender indicators and field-level gender analysis, which was presented at the UN Expert Group Meeting on Gender Mainstreaming in Santo Domingo in 2013, and documented in the UN Women Guidance Note on Gender Mainstreaming in Development Programming (2014). Mr. Tsang has a master degree in gender and development from the University of London, speaks English and some French, and has field experience in Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia and China – his native country. Victor may be contacted by email at 
victor.tsang@unep.org  and at telephone +254-20-7623680.

Ms Tanya McGregor has recently joined the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity as the Gender Programme Officer and is stationed at the Secretariat’s offices in Montreal, Canada. She comes from the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, where she worked for ten years in a variety of programming and policy roles in international development, on sectors including climate change, maternal and child health, natural resources management and food security. She has worked on mainstreaming and developing gender equality-focused international development programming. She has previously worked with the IUCN in South Africa on supporting sustainable natural resource management enterprises, and has worked with a number of Canadian environmental non-governmental organisations in program coordination roles. Tanya may be contacted by email at 
tanya.mcgregor@cbd.int, and  telephone  +1-514-287-6677 ext 320  

We look forward to both Victor and Tanya being active supporters of the GGCA!

Best regards. 


Janet


Janet Kabeberi-Macharia
, PhD.
Head, Gender and Social Safeguards Unit (GSSU), Office for Operations and Corporate Services
 
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)’ P.O. Box 30552-00100, Nairobi, KENYA
 
Tel: + 254 20 762 5142,  Cell: +254 728 600 106, 
SKYPE: janunep

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Introducing the Convention on Biological Diversity’s Gender Plan of Action – And Request for Case Studies on Ecosystem-based Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation

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Beijing+20: Education & Training of Women — Don’t miss Canada’s first woman astronaut on equality and infographic on why education matters

 English | Español | Français

UN Women <news.updates@unwomen.org>

info@worldviewmission.nl

 Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015
Subject: Beijing+20: Education & Training of Women — Don’t miss Canada’s first woman astronaut on equality and infographic on why education matters

UN Women updates on the Beijing+20 campaign.

 http://beijing20.unwomen.org/en

See our full line-up »

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Beijing+20: Women & Health – Don’t miss Melinda Gates on women’s health, new infographic on health risks women face, scientist Asel Sartbaeva & more

Website: English | Español | Français

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Hello Worldview Mission / (Ms. H. H. Oord) Headquarter Holland,

Happy International Women’s Day!

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UN devjustice

I could have been Mary Jane Veloso—Erwiana

BY APWLDADMIN · MAY 11, 2015

Mary Jane Veloso

Mary Jane Veloso was spared from death at the last minute. She still faces execution.

Mary Jane is a migrant domestic worker just like me. Like me, Mary Jane was forced to become a migrant domestic worker because of poverty, because of a commitment to support her family, because she had no other choice. Like me she suffered abuse. Like me she almost died……

More………..http://apwld.org/i-could-have-been-mary-jane-veloso-erwiana/

 

International Migrants Day: Demanding Protection for Foreign Domestic Workers and All Women Migrants

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Seeking Support for Nepal Women’s Relief and Recovery Fund- WOCAN

WOCAN is deeply saddened by the devastating earthquake that struck Nepal on 25 April 2015.

Our thoughts and prayers go out to those impacted by this disaster and their families, including those of our colleagues and partners.

WOCAN has a long history in Nepal and works closely with women’s groups including The Himalayan Grassroots Women’s Natural Resource Management Association (HIMAWANTI) ,The Association for Social Transformation and Humanitarian Assistance (ASTHA) and the Women’s Leadership Circle in Agriculture and Natural Resource Management.

WOCAN has implemented various projects with these women’s groups to strengthen their leadership skills and share knowledge on sustainable agriculture and forest management.

Most recently, WOCAN has implemented the W+ project to measure the time saved by women users of biogas in Nepal (http://www.wplus.org/projects/wplus-pilot-project-nepal)

We have launched the Nepal Women’s Relief and Recovery Fund to channel donations to meet the needs identified by our partners- women’s organizations – in affected communities.
Banner-Dibya Nepal

Dibya Gurung, WOCAN Core Associate, who resides in Kathmandu, has been assisting some of the partner organizations members with relief. Her reports to us emphasize the value of women’s leadership, demonstrated through their use of participatory decision making to determine to coordinate relief efforts.

She believes that the leadership of women is critical for effective relief and recovery of affected communities. In addition, the biogas digester units that are mostly intact will prove to be a critical resource for the provision of cooking energy that is generated at the household level, thus relieving the need to procure energy supplies from outside, that are in short supply. However, there is a need to provide assistance to those who lost their cooking stoves when houses collapsed, and whose units were damaged by the earthquake.
Dibya’s experience inspires us to try to raise more funds for both short term relief and long term recovery efforts, so that we can provide more women with leadership skills and resources to repair biogas digesters. We hope you can help us to secure funds by sharing information of the Nepali Women Relief and Recovery Fund with your members and through your listserves. Please do contact us to discuss collaboration to deliver more help to women organizations across affected villages of Nepal.
Sincerely,
Nisha Onta, PhD
Knowledge Management Coordinator
WOCAN (Women Organizing for Change in
Agriculture and Natural Resource Management)
United Center, Level 41 323 Silom Road,
Bangkok 10500, Thailand
Off: 66(0)81 871 2508

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UN Global Compact/ UN Women – Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs) Bulletin

Web Version

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Apply for a Scholarship to Attend the Women Deliver 2016 Conference

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Save the date! 6/10 WFPG 20th Anniversary Celebration

June 10, 2015 Wash DC

https://wfpg.memberclicks.net/assets/invites/20th-anniversary.pdf

This email was sent to Worldview Mission  worldview.mission@gmail.com by programs@wfpg.org

Women’s Foreign Policy Group | 1615 M Street, NW  | STE 210 | Washington, District of Columbia 20036 | United States

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Announcing WFPG 20th Anniversary Celebration!

Women F Policy GroupCONFERENCE 8:00 AM TO 5:00 PM LUNCHEON 12:00 PM TO 2:00 PM

THE RITZ-CARLTON, DC 1150 22ND STREET, NW TICKETS AND SPONSORSHIP 2 WOMEN’S FOREIGN POLICY GROUP CELEBRATING 20 YEARS OF PROMOTING WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP AND VOICES JUNE 10, 2015 WASHINGTON, DC WOMEN LEADERS TACKLING 21ST CENTURY CHALLENGES www.wfpg.org | programs@wfpg.org | 202 429 2637 MORNING SESSION CHAOS IN THE MIDDLE EAST: WHAT SHOULD THE US DO? WOMEN IN CHARGE: HOW THEY ARE CHANGING POLITICS, GOVERNMENT AND CORPORATE AMERICA 20TH ANNIVERSARY LUNCHEON HOW ARE TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIAL MEDIA REVOLUTIONIZING FOREIGN POLICY? AFTERNOON SESSION COVERING THE WORLD’S HOT SPOTS: THE INSIDE VIEW 20 NEW IDEAS TO MEET TOMORROW’S GLOBAL CHALLENGES EVENING RECEPTION CELEBRATING WOMEN LEADERS ACROSS GENERATIONS EVENING RECEPTION 7:30 PM TO 9:00 PM EMBASSY OF FINLAND 3301 MASSACHUSETTS AVE, NW

 

This email was sent to worldview.mission@gmail.com by programs@wfpg.org

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Updates from Women Deliver

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Meet the 10 Women Who Will Stop at Nothing

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CSW59: Virtual Teach-In on Sexing and Gendering Development 

Dear colleagues,

Regions Refocus 2015 is pleased to release the first video in our new series of Virtual Teach-Ins.

Timed to coincide with the first week of the 59th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW59), this Virtual Teach-In on Sexing and Gendering Development highlights the fundamental structural and social dimensions of sexuality and gender as they relate to development. At this important political moment of the 20-year review of the Beijing Declaration and Program for Action, coinciding with the processes towards the Third Conference on Financing for Development and the Post-2015 Summit, this video includes ground-breaking regional perspectives too often unheard in global fora.

The Sexing and Gendering Development Virtual Teach-In includes:

- Tonya Haynes of the Institute for Gender and Development Studies at the University of the West Indies and CatchAFyah Caribbean Feminist Network  (opening remarks)

- Akshay Khanna, University of Sussex

- Nicole Bidegain, DAWN

- Richie Maitland, Groundation Grenada Action Collective

- Daisy Alik-Momotaro, Women United Together Marshall Islands

- Shermal Wijewardene, University of Colombo (moderator)

Click here to access the Sexing and Gendering Development Virtual Teach-In video: http://youtu.be/XDV7eiGmj5w.

Stay tuned for future Virtual Teach-Ins, and keep up to date with Region Refocus 2015! We invite you to Like us on FacebookFollow us on Twitter, and sign up for our email listserv here.

Best regards,

Kathryn Tobin

Policy Coordinator

Virtual Teach-In: Sexing and Gendering Development

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDV7eiGmj5w

 

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Dear colleagues,

In 2015 the world’s governments will define a global agenda for sustainable development, amidst global trends of rising inequality, declining economic growth rates, and mega public-private partnerships accelerating the scramble for resources, assets, and markets. In this context, a new initiative housed at the Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation – Regions Refocus 2015 – fosters regional and feminist solidarities toward justice.

Please join us on 26 January for the launch of Regions Refocus 2015, at the Ford Foundation Headquarters or online via live webcast at www.daghammarskjold.se/regions-refocus. This event and collaborative publication will present experiences of advancing progressive public policies based on nine regional workshops held over the past nine months in partnership with civil society, government, sub-regional alliances, and the UN. Just as negotiations get underway for the Third Conference on Financing for Development and the Post-2015 Summit, this launch will feature regional perspectives on overcoming global obstacles that impede structural change for justice.

We hope you will be able to join us in New York or online for the launch of Regions Refocus 2015. In the meantime, follow us on Twitter @ReFocus2015 and join the conversation using #ReFocus2015. More information is attached and on our newly launched website, here: www.daghammarskjold.se/regions-refocus 


Our best,
Anita Nayar, Director
Kathryn Tobin, Policy Coordinator
Victoria Cotino, Program Associate
Devin Tellatin, Program Assistant

Regions Refocus 2015
Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation
Website: www.daghammarskjold.se/regions-refocus


Twitter: 
@ReFocus2015
Email: 
team@regionsrefocus.org
Register: 
https://regions-refocus.eventbrite.com
Share this event on Facebook and Twitter

  

  One-pager RR2015

 

12 Week 4D Ultrasound-Can you Tell the Gender?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaz9uI3BaP4

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CSW 59 recap, WILPF 100 invitation, & WPS Global Study surveyPeaceWomen March 2015 ENews

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Please send out widely the election of MARY ROBINSON for UN SG. from TamraRaven, INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL Of WOMEN.  e: Post-2015: Document on targets

Peace always, Tamra

www.eco-gstm.org/tamraraven/

TWEET @tamraraven

Geocoded Spatial Transparent Metric GSTM is a human spatial
think scale of ten kilometers cube stacked : 10km3/10km3
Unique locally 10km3x2:1m3GPS K12 and citizen science can use
MEMORY MEASURE MAP tool for data information.

 

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Empowering Women Is Key to Better Forest Management in Cameroon

Dear Colleagues,
WRI just released a Q&A with GGCA member Cécile Ndjebet of REFACOF.
Best regards,
Cara

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Call for Endorsements: Women’s Rights and Gender Equality in Care Work

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1I2cEDbIW04

Please see the statement on women’s rights and gender equality in care work below. To add your endorsements, please email leanne@apwld.org or fill out the form below.
In solidarity,
Leanne Sajor

Call for women’s rights and gender equality in care work

We come together as feminists and activists advocating against the inequality of women’s care work – both paid and unpaid.  Care work refers to those activities required to care for others through cooking, cleaning, taking care of children, the ill and the elderly.   Paid care work is commonly referred to as domestic work, while unpaid care work refers to the work done at home to care for one’s own household.  As more and more women enter the labour force, primarily in low-paying precarious and informal employment – often in paid care work – their workloads only increase as they are left to shoulder both paid work and unpaid care work.  Migrant domestic workers depend on other women to care for their children and parents when they leave their communities in search of work.Feminist economists, researchers and activists have long highlighted the centrality of social reproduction for the functioning of any economy and society.  Yet care work remains unvalued because it is seen as women’s work. Domestic work is rarely included as work under national labour codes, despite being the largest driver of labour migration for women. Cuts in public services and austerity measures across the global North and the global South have intensified women’s and girls’ unpaid care work.  Without access to water, basic healthcare, social protection and early childcare services women bear an unequal responsibility for household chores, taking care of the ill and elderly, and young children.  Increasing privatisation of public services, trade and investment liberalisation and the deregulation of labour all contribute to reducing the state’s responsibility for care provision, and shifting an unequal burden of care work to women living in poverty. Neoliberal policies are entrenching inequalities in care provision between the global North and the global South across gender, class, ethnicity, caste and race – with women living in poverty working to meet the care needs of wealthier households, without access to the public services or labour rights to protect their livelihoods and ensure the care of their own households.

We are coming together as individuals and organisations working on labour rights, particularly domestic worker rights and unpaid care work, to address the inequalities of care work.  We affirm that women’s unequal responsibility for care work leads to violations of women’s rights to decent work, political participation, education, healthcare and leisure time.  This perpetuates gender inequality and women’s care work – whether paid or unpaid – continues to be exploited and controlled through the use of violence and intimidation. Development justice is about establishing more sustainable models for care provision that does not exploit women’s labour. Development justice requires gender justice, economic justice and redistributive justice so that women’s rights are respected, protected and fulfilled.

This year is an important moment to advocate for care work to be recognised, valued, protected and redistributed.  A new development agenda will be adopted in September 2015 and will influence national policymaking and data collection on women’s paid and unpaid care work.   This year also marks the 20th anniversary of Beijing Platform for Action and an opportunity for governments to renew their commitments to women’s rights.  For the South East Asia region,the new economic community will outline migration policies in 2015 that will directly affectmigrant domestic workers’ rights.

As domestic workers, feminists, women’s rights organisations, research institutes and international non-governmental organisations we raise our voices to demand the following:  – Recognition, reduction and redistribution of unpaid care work through greater state responsibility for financing and delivering quality public services, infrastructure and regulation of the private sector to support care work through the provision of parental leave, sick leave and worksite crèches.The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women also notes that in addition to providing public services States parties must ensure “the recognition of the common responsibility of men and women in the upbringing and development of their children” (article 5).

- A living wage that allows workers and their families to live in dignity and recognises that women’s wages are just as important to male wages in sustaining households. A living wage target in the Sustainable Development Goals should acknowledge the multiple forms of family, the reality that women provide for children, extended family and other dependents. A living wage also needs to assure workers’ capacity to contribute to adequate social protection schemes, according to ILO Convention No. 102.

- Ratification of the ILO Convention 189 & Recommendation 201 on Domestic Workers is essential for the full realisation of a decent work agenda for domestic workers. This includes the right to unionise, protection of rights at work, and social protection. Domestic workers are entitled to all the protections detailed in the related ILO Convention No. 155 on Occupational Safety and Health and the Working Environment and the recognition of the “home” as workplace as detailed in ILO Convention 184 on Home Work Recommendation (para 8).  We reaffirm the call in CEDAW’s General Recommendation No.26 on Women Migrant Workers, “to formulate a gender-sensitive, rights based policy on the basis of equality and non-discrimination to regulate and administer all aspects and stages of migration, to facilitate access of women migrant workers to work opportunities abroad, promoting safe migration and ensuring the protection of the rights of women migrant workers.”

- Universal care sensitive social protection is necessary to address inequality and the unequal division of care work between women and men, households and the state.  In order to implement universal social protection schemes states must establish progressive tax systems and have the macroeconomic policy space to achieve this goal.All social protection initiatives need to have care related provisions that recognise, reduce and redistribute unpaidcare work responsibilities, represent carers in decision making, and have implementation and monitoring mechanisms that make unpaid care visible. The obligation to provide universal social protection was recognized by governments in the outcome document of the High-Level Plenary Meeting of the General Assembly on the MDGs, Keeping the Promise (para. 70(g); and is reiterated in Rio+20 Outcome Document, The Future We Want (2012), para. 156 and ILO Recommendation 202: Recommendation concerning National Floors of Social Protection (2012), which recommends that Members establish social protection floors as a fundamental element of their national security systems.

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Leanne Sajor
Feminist Development Justice Program
Ph: (66) 53 284527   Skype:apwldsec
25 years of promoting women’s human rights in the Asia Pacific region

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Watch Live: Secretary Clinton, Chelsea Clinton, & Melinda Gates

No Ceilings: The full Participation Project
                                              Dear Ms Helene H. Oord On Monday, March 9 at 11 AM ET, Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton, Chelsea Clinton, and Melinda Gates will host Not There Yet: A Data Driven Analysis of Gender Equality.This exciting event will be webcast live from New York City on clintonfoundation.org. Can we count on you to watch live?
Yes, I'll Tune In  No Thanks  
At the event, No Ceilings will release the findings of The Full Participation Report, an analysis of the gains women and girls have made over the last 20 years and the gaps that remain today. In honor of International Women’s Day, this groundbreaking event will bring together global and community leaders for a compelling look into the status of gender equality since 1995, when the world spoke with one voice to declare that “women’s rights are human rights.” We hope you are able to tune in. Don’t forget to join our online conversation with the hashtag #NoCeilings. Thanks,   The Clinton Foundation
About the Clinton Foundation The Clinton Foundation convenes businesses, governments, NGOs, and individuals to improve global health and wellness, increase opportunity for women and girls, reduce childhood obesity, create economic opportunity and growth, and help communities address the effects of climate change.
CLINTONFOUNDATION.ORG Donate
                                    Please add news@action.clintonfoundation.org to your address book. View this email as a webpage Clinton Foundation  |  1200 President Clinton Ave  |  Little Rock, AR 72201 This email was sent to Worldview Mission  worldview.mission@gmail.com.  .

 

CIAT’s new animated video on Gender, Agriculture and Climate Change

Dear Colleagues,
The International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), in collaboration with the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) and the University of Icesi (Cali, Colombia) are excited to present a new short animation that sheds light on how climate change is impacting the lives of rural women around the world. Furthermore it provides three suggestions to make women integral to research and development projects, for the interest of all.
Please share among your colleagues, networks, and support on social media as well.
Kind regards
Manon Koningstein
Research Associate/Communications Specialist Gender & Climate Change, International Centre for Tropical Agriculture- CIAT | Cali, Colombia
Investigadora Asociada/Especialista de Comunicacion Genero & Cambio Climático,  Centro Internacional de la  Agricultura Tropical – CIAT | Cali, Colombia
www.ciat.cgiar.org/gender-equity | Twitter: @genderciat | Skype: manonkoningstein 

YOUTUBE

Gender Inclusive Research: Why and How

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ony2GHjYEro

 

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Announcing our next film

Microbirth

Our next film

We’re excited to announce that our next project will be a feature-length documentary that picks up the story of the human microbiome where Microbirth left off.

Microbirth explored the seeding of the human microbiome at birth and the potential consequences of interfering with this crucial process.

Our next film will look at what can be done to help restore an out-of-balance microbiome to improve mental and physical health over a lifetime.

We’ve already started filming here in the UK and our journey is about to take us back to the US where leading scientists will be revealing the very latest microbial wonders and we’ll be finding out the simple things we can all do to improve our health.

We’ll be blogging along the way so if you want to keep up to date with our progress then you can read all about it on the Microbirth and One World Birth websites as well as on our Facebook pages: Microbirth & OWB.

Microbirth at Film Festivals

We are also thrilled to announce that, following on from winning the Grand Prix Award, at the Life Sciences Film Festival in Prague in October, Microbirth has been officially selected for international competition at a further two festivals taking place in April.

AFO50 International Festival of Science Science Documentary Films in Czech Republic – 14-19 April 2015

Cosmic Cine Film Festival in Germany / Switzerland 9-15 April 2015

We couldn’t be happier that the film is continuing to find an audience and hopefully it demonstrates how many people understand that what happens during childbirth (and immediately afterwards) can dramatically affect a child’s health for an entire lifetime and even beyond into subsequent generations.

From the feedback we’ve received so far, it looks as if Microbirth has kick-started debate all around the world and has already inspired discussions on how to make changes to maternity care in several countries.

Thank you to everyone who has hosted or attended a screening.

DVD Orders: temporary store closure
The good news is that we’ve been able to reduce the price of the Microbirth Personal-use DVD from $30.00 to $19.99. Click here
Unfortunately, as we’ll soon be busy filming we won’t be able to ship any DVD orders for a couple of weeks. So, if you’re planning a screening or urgently need a DVD, then the last shipping day is Thursday March 26th. Normal service will resume on April 10th.
Thank you for your continued support!
Toni & Alex

 

  Alto Films Ltd, 18B Cross Street, Hove, East Sussex BN3 1AJ, UNITED KINGDOM

 

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 Bangladesh Fighting Inequality at the Preschool Level

 

http://www.ipsnews.net/2015/01/dying-in-childbirth-still-a-national-trend-in-zimbabwe/

 

Click here for the online version of this IPS newsletter

 

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Many Women Activists Question Strength, Support of CSW 59 Political Declaration

 Many Women Activists Question Strength, Support of CSW 59 Political Declaration

WUNRN LISTSERVE <wunrn1@gmail.com> Date: Tue, Mar 10, 2015   Subject: [WUNRN] Many Women Activists Question Strength, Support of CSW 59 Political Declaration To: WUNRN ListServe <wunrn_listserve@lists.wunrn.com>

WUNRN

http://www.wunrn.com

E/CN.6/2015/L.1 - Political Declaration on the Occasion of the Twentieth Anniversary of the Fourth World Conference on Women

http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=E/CN.6/2015/L.1

http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2015/mar/09/un-declaration-step-backwards-for-womens-rights-csw

MANY WOMEN ACTIVISTS QUESTION CSW 59 POLITICAL DECLARATION, AS DILUTED, UNAMBITIOUS

CALL FOR STRONGER COMMITMENT TO WOMEN’S RIGHTS, HIGHER AMBITION, REAL RESOURCES, ACCOUNTABILITY

As the Commission on the Status of Women 59 meets, some UN states have been accused of trying to dilute a women’s rights declaration

Women’s rights activists have expressed alarm at the proposed wording of a UN declaration that they say could portend a major step backwards for women’s rights.

The text of the declaration, due to be published on 9 March at the start of the annual Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), has been branded bland and unambitious.

This year’s CSW will mark the 20th anniversary of the landmark fourth women’s world conference in Beijing in 1995. The conference’s platform for action, signed by 189 governments, identified 12 critical areas to empower women, such as greater involvement in decision-making and in conflict resolution, improving the rights of girls and ending violence. At the time, the agreement was seen as far-reaching and a blueprint for achieving women’s empowerment.

The two-week CSW, held in New York, will review progress made in implementing the Beijing recommendations over the past two decades.

But last week, the Women’s Rights Caucus, which monitors discussions at the CSW, said it was concerned that the language in the declaration was being watered down by certain UN states.

The caucus called on organisations to add their signatures to a statement demanding the declaration be strengthened.

“At a time when urgent action is needed to fully realise gender equality, the human rights and empowerment of women and girls, we need renewed commitment, a heightened level of ambition, real resources, and accountability,” said the statement.

“This political declaration, instead, represents a bland reaffirmation of existing commitments that fails to match the level of ambition in the Beijing declaration and platform for action and in fact threatens a major step backward.”

It added: “Governments cannot pick and choose when to respect, protect and fulfil the human rights of women and should not do so in this declaration.”

By Thursday, more than 770 organisations had signed the caucus statement.

It is understood that Russia, the Holy See (which has a seat on the UN as a non-member permanent observer state), Indonesia, Nicaragua and the Africa group of countries have tried to limit references in the text to human rights and to remove mention of the role feminist groups play in advancing gender equality. These states argue that human rights was just one chapter of the Beijing platform for action, rather than an overarching theme. Caribbean countries are also understood to have failed to step up to support women’s rights.

Turkey, Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Japan, Canada, Philippines, Chile, El Salvador, Australia and the EU are believed to be among those that have repeatedly challenged any removal of references to human rights.

The Holy See is also thought to have wanted mention of a standalone gender equality target proposed in the sustainable development goals removed from the declaration.

Any specific reference to women’s rights activists is expected to be lost.

The pushback on women’s existing rights from these states is not unusual in UN political statements, or are their attempts to block any progressive moves forward.

A record 8,600 civil society activists have signed up to attend this year’s CSW, which, as well as reflecting on the Beijing agreement, will discuss its relevance to the proposed SDGs, which are due to be implemented next year.

To contact the list administrator, send a message to WUNRN_LISTSERVE-owner@lists.wunrn.com 

 

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Sharing with you…

About Dignity and Transformation – Where will the SDGs lead us?

WM UN cropped-3-db-dsc01171

Dear all,
Please see https://peopleforestsrights.wordpress.com/2015/02/26/about-dignity-and-transformation-where-will-the-sdgs-lead-us/ for  an analysis by GFC’s Executive Director Simone Lovera    and Prof. Ashish Kotari about the Sustainable  Development Goals and to what extend they might    contribute to genuine transformation and dignity for    all.
Best wishes,


Isis K. Alvarez    Outreach and Communications Officer / Gender Advisor  Global Forest Coalition Women’s Major Group Organizing Partner T: +57 315 6484656 www.globalforestcoalition.org

Follow GFC on Facebook <https://www.facebook.com/pages/Global-Forest-Coalition/313049337000?ref=hl>                  & Twitter<http://twitter.com/gfc123>
*The Global Forest Coalition (GFC) is an international  coalition of NGOs and  Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations defending social justice and the rights of forest peoples in forest policies. *

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Her Royal Highness Crown Princess Mary of Denmark Named Patron of Women Deliver 2016 Conference

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EmpowerWomen.org Newsletter March 2015

Click here

http://www.empowerwomen.org/

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ICYO-Youth Information International Women’s Day special

 

International Women’s Day

We call on countries to “step it up” for gender equality -Message of Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women, for International Women’s Day 2015.

Mother, child and adolescent health high on Government agenda: Shri J P Nadda

ICYOYouth Information Newsletter

Indian Committee of Youth Organizations

Platform of Youth Organizations in India

India’s largest network of urban and rural youth

We call on countries to “step it up” for gender equality

Message of Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women, for International Women’s Day 2015.

In 1995, at the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, world leaders committed to a future where women are equal.

WM UN Women Pics image008 One hundred and eighty nine countries and 4,000 civil society organizations, attended the conference.

Women left Beijing with high hopes, with a well-defined path towards equality, and firm commitments at the highest level. Their hope was that we would see this by 2005.

Today, not one single country has achieved equality. It is more urgent than ever that we define – and stick to – a time frame.

There has been some progress in the last 20 years – although it has been slow and uneven.

Countries have narrowed the gender gap in education and some have even reached gender parity in school enrolment.

They have reduced the toll of maternal mortality and morbidity. Many more women survive pregnancy and childbirth than in 1995.

Many countries have created institutions that address gender inequality. Many have passed laws against gender-based discrimination. Many have made domestic violence a crime.

This is all good news.

And yet we are still a long way from achieving equality between men and women, boys and girls.

Implementation of good policies has been patchy. Allocation of the resources needed for effective implementation has been insufficient to fund women’s ministries, gender commissions, gender focal points, and gender-responsive budgeting.

For too many women, especially in the least-developed countries, not enough has changed.

In Africa, 70 per cent of crop production depends on women yet women still own only 2 per cent of the land.

Violence against women continues to blight lives in all countries of the world.

And no country has achieved gender equality.

Women need change and humanity needs change. This we can do together; women and girls, men and boys, young and old, rich and poor.

The evidence is overwhelming of the benefits that equality can bring. Economies grow, poverty is alleviated, health status climbs, and communities are more stable and resilient to environmental or humanitarian crises.

Women want their leaders to renew the promises made to them. They want leaders to recommit to the Beijing Declaration, to the Platform for Action, and to accelerated and bolder implementation.

They want more of their leaders to be women. And they want those women, together with men, to dare to change the economic and political paradigms. Gender parity must be reached before 2030, so that we avert the sluggish trajectory of progress that condemns a child born today to wait 80 years before they see an equal world.

Today, on International Women’s Day, we call on countries to “step it up” for gender equality, with substantive progress by 2020. Our aim is to reach ‘Planet 50:50’ before 2030.

The world needs full equality in order for humanity to prosper.

Empower women, empower humanity. I am sure you can picture an equal world!

 WM Union Min health  Mother, child and adolescent health high on Government agenda: Shri J P Nadda

The health of women, young adults and children is central to the governance agenda the Government and it is not just the concern of the global community. Reaffirming the commitment of the government towards meeting the health needs of mothers, adolescents and children, the Union Minister for Health and Family Welfare Shri J P Nadda stated this at the inauguration of the two day Global Stakeholders’ Consultation to update the strategy for health of Woman, Children and Adolescents- “Every Woman, Every Child”, held in New Delhi on 26th March 2015. The global consultation is being hosted by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare along with UN Secretary General’s Office, WHO, Partnership for Maternal, New born & Child Health (PMNCH) and others.

Pointing that improved health outcomes are an economic and social investment which is an integral part for a robust and thriving economy, the Health Minister pointed out that India has made substantial progress on several indicators in the recent years. The under-five mortality rate has come down by over 61 per cent between 1990 and 2013; the neonatal mortality rate has registered a 47 per cent decline between 1990 and 2013, while the maternal mortality indicators have shown reduction of nearly 70 per cent between 1990 and 2013. He stated that India is geared to achieve its targets for both MGD 4 and 5.

Shri Nadda stated that drawing on the lessons learned through the implementation of various targeted programmes under the NHM, existing traditional areas of work have been strengthened and newer focus areas have been identified. India has moved from its earlier focus on Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) to a new strategic approach, the RMNCH+A, focusing attention on all the life stages including adolescents. This new approach emphasizes inter-linkages between each of the five pillars under RMNCH+A, and connects community and facility based services.

Speaking at the occasion, Ms Amina Mohammed, Special Advisor to UN Secretary General said that while tremendous progress has been made during the last decade on several indicators of mother, child and adolescent health, much remains to be done. There is need for deepening and strengthening partnerships between various stakeholders for achieving the goals for a sustainable development agenda. Emerging economies have an important role to play within this framework of partnership, she added.

The updated 2015 Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health seeks to inform the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agenda with a vision to ensure that by 2030 every woman, child, and adolescent can realize their potential and right to attain the highest level of health and wellbeing, dignity and human security. The new Global Strategy, set to be released at the UN General Assembly in September alongside the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will provide a roadmap for improving the health of women, children and adolescents between 2016 and 2030.

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Youth Information is published by Indian Committee of Youth Organizations (ICYO) 194-A, Arjun Nagar, Safdarjang Enclave New Delhi 110029, India Phone: 91 9811729093  / 91 11 26183978/ 91 11 26198423 Email: icyoindia@gmail.com   Web:  www.icyo.in

Facebook/Twitter/Linkedin : icyoindia = Indian Committee of Youth Organizations (ICYO) is a registered non-profit, non-governmental network organization, committed in developing areas of mutual cooperation and understanding among different youth voluntary agencies, youth groups, clubs and individuals working in the field of youth welfare in India.

ICYO functions as an umbrella organization of youth NGOs in India. It’s family consists of over 441 organizations spread in 124 districts of 26 states from different corners of India. Our goal:

ü  To improve and extend the youth work and services through Youth Organizations;

ü  To enhance and demonstrate youth work in the society;

ü  To promote effective youth programmme;

ü  To organize network of civil society organizations working towards the development of youth work;

ü  To organize seminars, conferences, workshops, trainings;

ü  To maintain international relation with organizations promoting young people in their programme and activities

Affiliation

ü  Consultative (Roster) Status with ECOSOC, United Nations;

ü  Consultative Status with Commission on Sustainable Development;

ü  Full Member of Asian Youth Council (AYC); World Assembly of Youth (WAY);

ü  Associate with Foundation for Leadership Initiatives (FLI).

 

WM Women India image001          WM UN Women Pics image008

 

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At the World Bank, finance ministers turn into gay rights advocates;  Gender Equity

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UN Women’s Fund for Gender Equality issues Call for Proposals 2015

NGO News <ngoMILAews@un.org> Date: Thu, Feb 26, 2015

Subject: [NGO News:] UN Women’s Fund for Gender Equality issues Call for Proposals 2015 To: tlalibertad@gmail.com

UN Women’s Fund for Gender Equality issues Call for Proposals 2015
The United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) is pleased to announce its third Fund for Gender Equality Call for Proposals.
This year the Fund for Gender Equality will welcome online proposal submissions from women-led Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) that are innovative, high-impact, and multi-stakeholder programmes that help jumpstart progress on the Post-2015 Development Agenda with a focus on women’s economic and political empowerment.
The Fund will grant applications in the areas of:
-       Women’s economic empowerment: efforts to expand women’s equal opportunities to access and control economic resources, promote women’s sustainable entrepreneurship, access to decent work and equal pay, and shared responsibility within the household.
-       Women’s political empowerment: efforts to promote women’s full and effective leadership and political participation at all levels of decision-making and in all spheres of life, or initiatives to help design, enforce and implement new and existing gender equality laws and policies, or to shift social norms and practices toward greater respect for and enjoyment of women’s equal rights.
Interested applicants are encouraged to read the Call for Proposals and start preparing for the online application process that will open from 9 March to 5 April 2015. For more information please visit www.unwomen.org/FGE.
Any individual or organization interested in knowing more about the Fund for Gender Equality and the release of the new Call for Proposals is cordially invited to participate in two upcoming events in New York in the context of the 59th session of the Commission for the Status of Women (CSW):
-       Panel on “Civil Society at the Forefront of the Post-2015 Agenda”, where UN Women Executive Director, Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka will officially launch the Call for Proposals and discuss with other civil society and donor representatives the critical role women-led CSOs play in the implementation of women’s economic and political empowerment commitments, and in furthering the upcoming Sustainable Development Goals.
Date: 17 March 2015 2015, 11.30am
Venue: UN Secretariat, DHL auditorium (UN accreditation required for entrance)
-       Questions & Answers Session for Civil Society Organizations on how to apply to the Call for Proposals
Date: 18 March 2015, 2.30pm
Venue: Church Center, 2nd Floor, 777 1st Avenue (no registration required)

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Special ENews: Launching new PeaceWomen.org – Your Resource on Women, Peace and Security

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Brief Report Back on Gender at Geneva

Hello all,
I just wanted to share with you a brief report back on gender at the UNFCCC sessions in Geneva.
And there was also good coverage from outside the halls, with interviews with UN Women and gender-champion delegates:
Best,
Bridget K. Burns
Advocacy and Communications Director
Women’s Environment & Development Organization (WEDO)
Twitter: @WEDO_Worldwide/ @bridiekatie
skype: bridget.k.burns

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March for Gender Equality and Women’s Rights on March 8 in NYC

An Invitation to Join the March for Gender Equality and Women’s Rights

 Dear Friends,

Friendship Ambassadors Foundation invites you to participate in the March for Gender Equality and Women’s Rights on International Women’s Day, March 8, 2015.

The March for Gender Equality and Women’s Rights is being organized by UN Women in collaboration with the City of New York, NGO-CSW, the Working Group on Girls, the Man Up Campaign and the UN Women for Peace Association.

The march will take place on International Women’s Day (March 8) and will commemorate the 20-year anniversary of the Fourth World Conference on Women and the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. This event will celebrate the achievements women and girls have made around the world since 1995. It will also be an opportunity to underscore the need for political commitment to accelerate action to achieve gender equality by 2030.

The march will start at the Dag Hammarskjold Plaza (47th street and 2nd avenue) at 2:30 pm and end at Times Square (42nd street and 7th avenue) at 5:00 p.m.

The march will be divided into three parts:

  • Part 1-A lively start at Dag Hammarskjold Plaza. The march will be flagged off by the UN Women Executive Director following a short program of 30 minutes. Eminent celebrities, a New York indigenous women’s group, and a girls’ dance troupe are on the programme.
  • Part 2-A 1.5-hour march from Dag Hammarskjold to Times Square. The march will be a celebration that will include singing, marching, raising slogans, and showing solidarity for gender equality and women’s rights. At the same time, the march will help point out the existing gaps and barriers to achieving gender equality.
  • Part 3-An evocative closing at Times Square. The 30-minute program will consist of raising a collective torch to showcase intergenerational partnership. The program will bring together Ambassador Gertrude Mongella, the UN Women Executive Director, the First Lady of New York, the UN Secretary General (TBD) and others. The program will conclude with a song and a call to achieve gender equality by 2030.

In terms of the choreography of the march, the participants will be divided into 12 blocks representing the 12 critical areas of concern in the Beijing +20 Platform for Action. These 12 blocks will be led by the first block that will represent the overall theme of Beijing+20 and Planet 50-50: Step It Up for Gender Equality – March for Gender Equality and Women’s Rights.

The 12 critical areas of concern are as follows:

  1. Women and the environment
  2. Women in power and decision-making
  3. The girl child
  4. Women and the economy
  5. Women and poverty
  6. Violence against women
  7. Human rights of women
  8. Education and training of women
  9. Institutional mechanisms for the advancement of women
  10. Women and health
  11. Women and the media
  12. Women and armed conflict 

13 banners will be prepared in addition to many placards, posters, and signs calling for gender equality and women’s rights. Your organizations are encouraged to bring your messages to the event and messages and materials for campaigns regarding Beijing+20, gender equality and women and girls’ empowerment.

Extensive outreach and mobilization is underway with an intention to bring between 10,000 and 20,000  people to march for gender equality. The last march of this magnitude for gender equality in New York City took place in the 1970s.

We invite you to join the march and to spread the word far and wide using the hashtags #Beijing20 and #genderequalitymarch. You can also go to @UN_Women for coverage of the march. Please disseminate the attached flyer widely through your networks and social media.

You are welcomed to focus on any of the themes or critical areas of concern that are most relevant to your organization. Please contact my colleague Ravi Karkara, Strategic Adviser Partnership to the Deputy Executive Director UN-Women who is coordinating the march (ravi.karkara@unwomen.org)

We thank you for your support.

Warm regards,

Patrick Sciarratta

Executive Director

Friendship Ambassadors Foundation, Inc.

FRIENDSHIP AMBASSADORS FOUNDATION, INC.

A Not-for-Profit, Tax Exempt 501(c)(3) Organization

Member or Associated:  UN DPI ● UNESCO (Consultative Status) ● IATAN ● American Choral Directors Association

www.YouthAssembly.nyc

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GGCA in Action

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Pics CCandHR_Feb2015

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Pacific Partnerships on Gender, Climate Change and Sustainable Development (PPGCCSD)

Dear Community of Educators,
Noelene Nabulivou [Fiji] has provided us with a report on Gender in the Pacific.  Do you  have news from your region on these issues?  It is definitely on the agenda as we prepare for COP 21 in Paris.
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
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Pacific Partnerships on Gender, Climate Change and Sustainable Development (Pacific)

A Pacific regional initiative on gender, climate change and sustainable development has brought together over 60 representatives of Pacific civil society organizations, regional technical bodies (the Secretariat of the Pacific Community as well as the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat), and national women’s machineries from nearly a dozen Pacific countries. The work continues to develop over time, and as resources allow.

 WM Gender pacific

A ground-breaking five-day meeting in June 2014 in Nadi, Fiji was developed and co-convened by the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), Diverse Voices and Action for Equality (DIVA for Equality) and the Pacific Youth Council,  in partnership with Regions Refocus 2015, an initiative housed at the Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, with further financial and in-kind contributions from Fiji Women’s Rights Movement (FWRM),  the Women’s Major Group on Sustainable Development (WMG),  the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), Global Fund for Women, and Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN), among others. The initial meeting brought together over 60 representatives of Pacific civil society organizations, regional technical bodies (SPC as well as the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat), and national women’s machineries from nearly a dozen Pacific countries.

The first two days, 9-10 June 2014, provided space for capacity building and sharing amongst civil society representatives, who engaged in cross-sectoral group work, wrote and presented mini-statements, learned advocacy strategies, and benefited from structured and individualized feedback and collective planning. The civil society days resulted in a targeted political outcome document (see below), adopted by consensus after a powerful process of joint drafting and editing.

As of the third day, 11 June 2014, the civil society meeting was joined by government representatives, who had engaged in a separate meeting at the same location during the beginning of the week. Together, participants dedicated a considerable amount of energy and time to joint analysis and strategy, working together in national and thematic breakout groups to identify priorities and build collaboration towards upcoming regional processes including the subsequent meeting of the Pacific Islands Forum, as well as specific focus on the Small Islands Developing States (SIDS) preparatory process and conference held in Apia, Samoa 1-4 September 2014) and regional priorities towards the post-2015 agenda, UNFCCC, 3rd Global Conference on FFD, and broader and longterm regional priorities.

The meeting outcome document, written through an extremely productive process amongst key civil society representatives and national women’s machineries from Samoa and Kiribati on behalf of the government delegates present, also looks towards the upcoming pivotal meetings of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). This outcome document is the first joint statement put forward by Pacific government and civil society representatives on gender, climate change and sustainable development, and includes strong, progressive language on climate finance, gender equality including through legislation, and structural issues of trade and the international financial system.

Since the first meeting, the networked activity continues to grow sustainably over time, with an initial Working Group now in place, closed information-sharing list-serve; active social media presence (Facebook, Twitter to come); networked and supported advocacy presence in the preparatory stages and at 3rd Global Conference on SIDs in Samoa in 2014, Global Climate Change Summit and GA meetings in September 2014 in NY and associated activities; Information-sharing and strategy meetings with wider RegionsRefocus 2015 members from Africa, Asia, Latin America, Caribbean, and Europe in January 2015;  Government, CSO and development agency presence at the Financing for Development preparatory session toward the 3rd Global Conference on Financing for Development in NY in January 2015; and upcoming presence at the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW59)/Beijing+20.  We are also providing active input into the 3rd Global Conference on DRR in Sendai, Japan, and throughout these crucial last months of the UNFCCC COP21 preparatory meetings, including the ADP in Geneva from 8-13 February 2015.

Joint civil society and government statement, here.

Feminist and civil society statement, here;

For more information and regional resources, see here.

PPGCCSD and link to 3rd Global Conference on Small Island Developing States (SIDS), here

References to PPGCCSD work in the context of wider Regions Refocus 2015 work, here. (Note, the report will soon be further updated)

Our Facebook page, here.

For more information please contact:

Noelene Nabulivounoelenen@gmail.com

Tarusila Bradburgh pacificyouthcouncil@gmail.com and

Brigitte Leduc brigittel@spc.int

Thanks,

Noelene Nabulivou, Fiji

for the Co-convenors, Regional Working Group, PPGCCSD (Pacific Regional)

21 February, 2015.

-Information above adapted/updated from RR2015 information page on PPGCCSD, with thanks!

ends.

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WM Beijing Gender Platform4Action

SPC Beijing Platform for Action and Me: an interactive discussion on gender equality progress in the Pacific

an interactive discussion on gender equality progress in the Pacific

To celebrate achievements made by Pacific societies towards gender equality and strategize over remaining gaps, SPC is launching an interactive discussion from February to July 2015. Each first and third Monday of the month, we will share with Pacwin members, an interesting finding from the Beijing +20 regional review, a startling statistic, a promising development or an important gap on each of the 12 priority areas of the Beijing Platform for Action.
With follow-up questions, we will exchange on successes and setbacks and collectively imagine ways to address some of the key challenges facing women and girls in the region. Everyone is welcomed to join the conversation!
The objective is to discuss where we stand on the various dimensions of gender equality and put together our ideas on how to create and maintain a momentum over gender equality in the region.
The most salient points will be captured by SPC and shared during the discussion on gender equality at the United Nations Sustainable Development Conference in September 2015.
How do I join the talk?
If not yet a Pacwin user yet, send an email to Mereoni Tavakaturaga-Robinson atmereonir@spc.int and she will enroll you. You will receive each intervention through an email in your inbox. You will also be able to amend the settings to receive only daily or weekly updates.
How can I contribute?
Bring your perspective, share the story of your organization, its achievements, its challenges or share you own personal testimony! How do the statistics and findings from the Pacific Regional report relate to your own life, hopes and aspirations? What are your strategies? Have you observed any progress or setbacks in that area?
Schedule of discussions:
February 2nd 2015: Area A. Women and Poverty
February 16th 2015: Area B. Education and Training of Women
March 2nd 2015: Area C. Women and Health
March 16th 2015: Area D. Violence against Women
April 7th 2015: Area E. Women and Armed Conflict
April 20th 2015: Area F. Women and the Economy
May 4th 2015: Area G. Women in Power and Decision-Making
May 18th 2015: Area H. Mechanisms for the Advancement of Women
June 1st 2015: Area I. Human Rights of Women
June 15th 2015: Area J. Women and the Media
July 6th 2015: Area K. Women and the Environment
July 20th 2015: Area L. The Girl Child
Join and raise your voice!
Brigitte Leduc
Gender Equality Adviser /  Conseillère en égalité des sexes
Social Development Division / Division développement social
Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) / Secrétariat Général de la Communauté du Pacifique (CPS)
B.P. D5, 98848 Nouméa Cedex, New Caledonia
Direct line: +687 26 01 57

 

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Update from the ADP Meeting – Geneva  Gender and Climate Change/Human Rights – equity

Hi all,

Just wanted to send some updates from Geneva and the start of the UNFCCC negotiations.
The talks kicked off quite quickly going through the Opening Plenary in one hour with Parties agreeing for forego group statements and submit them online. We moved directly to a section by section review of the current elements text.
The first section was General section C. Of note were the strong interventions on human rights and gender equality as guiding cross-cutting elements of the new agreement.
The co-Chairs process for the sessions was to take any new/additional comments or language, and then move on to overall comments
In the General section, the first intervention was from Mexico calling for “Parties to respect human rights and gender equality in implementation of all climate policies and actions.”
This was supported by Uganda and Chile. The EU then put forward an additional strong proposal stating: “All Parties and stakeholders shall, in all climate change related actions, respect, protect, promote, and fulfill human rights for all. All Parties shall be guided by gender equality and ensure the full and equal participation of women in all climate actions and decision making processes. All Parties should consider in their climate policies and actions a just transition of the workforce that creates decent work and quality jobs.”
LDCs and African Group said they were also proposing language on gender equality.
These proposals have been integrated into a new para, 12bis, into an updated draft text of the General section C. http://unfccc.int/files/bodies/awg/application/pdf/section_c_general_objective_-_08022015@2100.pdf
It is quite unprecedented, and it was amazing to be in the room to see the strength of the proposals and the breadth of Parties putting language forward.
Gender equality is certainly firmly rooted in these negotiations and as a critical aspect of climate policy, but of course, much more work needs to be done on this and for ambition in the overall agreement.
For this text/section, an issue lies in what this section will look like with some Parties feeling/ suggesting that it should be short and just a reiteration of the Objective of the Convention. There will likely be a facilitated discussion on this later in the week– towards a short and concise Objective which may cover these additional issues. Tuvalu and others may it clear that they felt a more holistic objective encompassing the urgency of the issues, prioritizing and emphasizing the challenges of developing countries, SIDs, LDCs, etc.
I will be sure to send any further developments on this through the week.
Best,
Bridget

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Beijing+20: Education & Training of Women — Don’t miss Canada’s first woman astronaut on equality and infographic on why education matters

UN Women updates on the Beijing+20 campaign

Website: English   Español    Français

Beijing+20 Focus this Month

Education & Training of Women

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EmpowerWomen.org Newsletter January 2015

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Reminder: Nominate civil society speakers for UN PGA’s Thematic Debate on Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment for Post-2015

Dear CPG4SD,

Below are instructions for nominating speakers for the President’s High-level Thematic Debate on “Achieving      gender equality and empowerment of women and girls for a      transformative post-2015 development agenda” on 6      March 2015.  3 civil society speaking roles are open for    nomination.  Deadline for nominations will be on FEBRUARY 3    while applications to participate to the civil society selection    committee will be on JANUARY 30.
The concept note for the event is available here: http://unngls.org/images//PDF/Concept_Note-GEEWG_UNPGA.pdf
Thank you.
Best,
April     for the Secretariat

Subject: Reminder: Nominate civil society speakers for UN                    PGA’s Thematic Debate on Gender Equality and Women’s                    Empowerment for Post-2015
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 21:53:51 -0500
From: Susan Alzner <alzner@un.org>
To: info@un-ngls.org                     <info@un-ngls.org>

عربي          http://bit.ly/Arabic_PGA_6March 中文          http://bit.ly/Chinese_PGA_6March               Español    http://bit.ly/Espanol_PGA_6March                             Français    http://bit.ly/Francais_PGA_6March               Русский    http://bit.ly/Russian_PGA_6March                             English     http://bit.ly/English_PGA_6March
Nominate civil society speakers for the UN President of                the General Assembly’s High-level Thematic Debate on                “Achieving gender equality and empowerment of women and                girls for a transformative post-2015 development agenda”                               Dear Colleagues,                               At the request of the Office of the President of the              General Assembly (OPGA), UN-NGLS is conducting an open              nomination process for 3 civil society speaking roles in              the President’s High-level Thematic Debate on “Achieving              gender equality and empowerment of women and girls for a              transformative post-2015 development agenda.” This event              will take place on 6 March 2015 at UN Headquarters in New              York. Travel funding will be provided for the 3 civil              society speakers that are selected.                               For more information and to submit nominations, please              visit: http://bit.ly/English_PGA_6March
Friday, 30 January: Deadline for applications to                participate in the civil society Selection Committee
Tuesday, 3 February: Deadline for submission of civil                society speaker nominations
             

Best regards,               UN-NGLS

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2015 Milestones, WILPF 100, and more (PeaceWomen December ENews)

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{Women_Major_Group} Guardian on SDGs and GENDER: What Will Shape Women’s Rights over the Next 15 Years – Sustainable Development Goals?

Subject: {Women_Major_Group} Guardian on SDGs and GENDER: What Will Shape Women’s Rights over the Next 15 Years – Sustainable Development Goals? To: Women Major Group Listserve <women_major_group@googlegroups.com>

What Will Shape Women’s Rights over the Next 15 Years?
What should be included in the sustainable development goals to promote women’s equality and empowerment, and will they work?
WM UN Pics Women Gender
One of the SDGs encourages the world to ‘achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls’. Photograph: Paballo Thekiso/AFP/Getty Images
By Carla Kweifio-Okai – 14 January 2015
Decisions made in 2015 will help shape the women’s rights agenda for the next 15 years. In September, world leaders will endorse a new set of development goals at the UN. The proposed Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which will replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), feature a standalone goal on gender, which encourages the world to “achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls”.
Goal number five of the Sustainable Development Goals currently features 9 targets, which are:
  • End all forms of discrimination against women and girls everywhere
  • Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation
  • Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilations
  • Recognise and value unpaid care and domestic work, and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family as nationally appropriate
  • Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making
  • Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights
  • Undertake reforms to give women equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to ownership and control over land and other forms of property
  • Enhance the use of enabling technologies, in particular ICT, to promote women’s empowerment
  • Adopt and strengthen sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality
A target in goal number three – promoting healthy lives and wellbeing – calls for universal access to sexual and reproductive health services.
Discussions about the content of the goals, which will apply to all countries, began in 2013, and a final draft was published in July. The UN starts negotiations next week on finalising the SDGs.
Do you think these targets are sufficient? Has anything been missed out or lost in the discussions? What do you think should be a priority in your country? Are LGBT rights being ignored? Will a requirement to ban FGM make the final document? How will countries that have a poor record on women’s rights view the SDGs?
To contact the list administrator, send a message to WUNRN_LISTSERVE-owner@lists.wunrn.com
Sascha Gabizon   I   Executive Director WECF / WICF   
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www.projectnesting.org

WICF/WECF co-facilitates the Women’s Major Group for the United Nations

UN Sustainable Development and Environment processes www.womenmajorgroup.org follow us @Women_Rio20
WECF is co-organizer of the following campaign. Please give support.
WM Pics Stop Gemical
Tell the European Commission to remove hormone disrupting chemicals (EDCs) from our lives to protect our health!                                                                                                                 
Take action at
 www.no2hormonedisruptingchemicals.org/                    before 16 January 2015
WM WECF BannerPics

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Gender Equality: Year in Review 2014 (Interactive Timeline)

http://www.un.org/womenwatch/timeline/2014-year-in-review.html

 

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Give a gift that ends violence against women and girls

WM UN Women saynounnamed (1)

Hello Ms. H. H. Oord,

  The holidays are coming, and knowing how much you care about ending violence against women and girls, I thought of sharing this with you.
Give a gift that can help end violence against women!
The UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women, the only grant-making mechanism at the United Nations that exclusively supports programmes to end violence against women and girls, has partnered with Soko, an ethical company, to bring us a beautiful orange bracelet. It’s festive and elegant, and symbolizes a future free of violence against women and girls.
The proceeds from the bracelet will benefit an underprivileged artisan community in Kenya, and support UN Trust Fund programmes!   Get one for yourself, or for a friend or a loved one, and tell them why. shopsoko.com/collections/UNTF
This holiday season, make ending violence against women and girls a priority for everyone.
Click here to find out more about the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women.
Happy holidays and here’s to a future free of violence against women!
Urjasi Rudra Say NO – UNiTE Team, UN Women

 

View it in your browser.

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2014 In Review, WPS Roundtable, More (PeaceWomen December ENews)                       View it in your browser.

In Peace,

Maria Butler (PeaceWomen Programme Director), Abigail Ruane (PeaceWomen Programme Manager), Kristina Johansson (Sub-Editor), and the PeaceWomen Team

Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom
United Nations Office, 777 UN Plaza,
New York, NY 10017, USA
Tel: 1.212.682.1265 Fax: 1.212.286.8211
Web: www.peacewomen.org

 

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Every Day is Human Rights Day

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New gender and climate change article – get the discussion going

Dear Colleagues,
Huffington Post just posted an article Lorena Aguilar, IUCN, wrote about gender and climate change: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lorena-aguilar/the-time-is-now-to-incorp_b_6254724.html.
Please take a moment to read it, consider its impact, and add a thought or two in the comments!  We need more voices supporting gender and more voices supporting gender in the CoPs,
Best,
Cara Beasley | Coordinator | Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA) e: cara@gender-climate.org | s: cara.beasley | t: @GGCA_gender | w: http://www.gender-climate.org

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China Post-2015     中國郵政-2015 

 

LOGO CHINA images

.

http://www.fmprc.gov.cn/mfa_chn/         简体中文              繁体中文

http://www.fmprc.gov.cn/mfa_eng/

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http://www.fmprc.gov.cn/mfa_eng/wjbxw/t1201087.shtml

  http://www.post2015women.com/  

 

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Launch of Global Giving Open Challenge

Dear Worldview mission team,

Warm  greetings! I have the pleasure to inform you that the official launch of the Global Giving Open Challenge begins on Monday 1st to 30th December 2014. This is to kindly invite you to donate to this project.

Also on the Giving Tuesday 2nd December 2014, please remember to offer a gift to this project.  

http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/support-100-vulnerable-girls-become-self-reliant/

Thank you so much

Betty Nankinga

Programs Director

To Worldview Mission team  EFP GlobalGiving day outreach letter

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Global Gender Climate Alliance in Action

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click here to view online version.

PUTTING THE PIECES TOGETHER

Gender equality needs to be a central part of any new agreement. 
Did you know that the UNFCCC is the only Rio convention that does not have gender in its outset?  Although many programs and decisions after Copenhagen include a gender reference, the UNFCCC still lacks an overarching mandate on gender.  It is time for that to change, so a strong contingent of GGCA members and partners will be present at COP20 working with parties to champion gender equality as a key element of the new climate agreement and as a cross-cutting issue in all negotiation areas plus ensure that progress is made on gender as a whole.  Timely articles and resources in this newsletter spell out just how to put those pieces together!
- Cara Beasley, GGCA Coordinator
Photo: Nathalie Eddy
CLIMATE DEAL MUST BRING GENDER EQUALITY
Christiana Figueres, UN Climate Chief, shares her determination to put gender equality at the heart of efforts to tackle climate change – a new climate deal must bring gender equality.  Photo/UNFCCCA
WHY EFFECTIVE CLIMATE POLICY NEEDS WOMEN 
Aira Kalela, Senior Advisor to Finland, shares why integrating a gender approach in the new climate deal is vital for promoting gender responsive climate action at multiple levels.  Photo/IISD
GENDER EQUALITY IN CURRENT UNFCCC DECISIONS
A new policy guide in preparation for COP20 outlines “Existing Mandates and Entry Points for Gender Equality” – brought to us by WEDO and IUCN.  VIEW MORE
GENDER GAPS IN FINANCING CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION
This collaborative initiative exposes gender gaps in financing climate change mitigation and proposes solutions – by WEDO, ENERGIA, and GGCA for CDKN.  VIEW MORE
GENDER, MITIGATION, AND TECHNOLOGY
This short briefing paper looks at the gender linkages across the technology value change (transport and energy) as well as specific adaptation areas (water and agriculture).  VIEW MORE
LINKING IPCC & GENDER DATA WITH CLIMATE ACTIONS
This factsheet highlights links between the data presented in the  IPCC AR5 report, gender data, and proposes some actions to mitigate or adapt to climate change.  VIEW MORE
   No Climate Justice without Gender Justice
Hundreds of women and men marched together at the People’s Climate March in New York City to proclaim what we know to be true – there can be “no climate justice without gender justice”.
    Women are Essential for Resilient Cities
Eleanor Blomstrom, WEDO, explains one of the many connections between climate change, urban resilience, and gender equality.   VIEW MORE
  Time Saving for Nepali Women
This project under the W+ program in Nepal helps eliminate time-consuming tasks so women have the opportunity to pursue income generation, community leadership, and self-improvement activities. VIEW MORE
     Gender and Inclusion in Climate Change Projects
This new toolbox from CCAFS supports integration of gender and social perspectives in climate research and program development.  VIEW MORE

 

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NEW Blog: Why Women are Essential for City Resilience
Dear all,
Apologies for cross-posting.
WEDO is pleased to share a recent blog written for the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities Project on “Why Women are Essential for City Resilience”.
Please feel free to share and for more information on this work, please contact Ms. Gina Stovall, mobilize@wedo.org and Ms. Beatrice Mauger beatrice@wedo.org.
Best,
Bridget K. Burns
Advocacy and Communications Director 
Women’s Environment & Development Organization (WEDO)
t:+ 212.973.0325 ext.221 / f:+ 212.973.0335
skype: bridget.k.burns

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Dedicated gender toolbox platform now available
Dear Colleagues,
Earlier this year, the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) together with partners, launched a Gender and Social Inclusion Toolbox for development research via a live-streamed event.
We’ve now put the final touches on a platform dedicated to the toolbox, found here, which we encourage you to check out! 
Here you’ll be able to learn more about the process leading up to the final product, the people and organisations involved in the development and watch the video from the live-streamed event.
If you haven’t done it already, read the research highlight introducing the toolbox on CCAFS blog,download the manual (PDF) and discuss the tools and methods in our LinkedIn group dedicated to gender, climate change and agriculture.
If you have any questions about the Toolbox, please don’t hesitate to contact me!
Best,
Cecilia Schubert
Communications Officer 
CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS)
CCAFS Website I Facebook I Twitter

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47EuyoAlGIE

 

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[GGCA] Iceland continues to top overall rankings in The Global Gender Gap Index

Dear GGCA Colleagues,

 Iceland leads the rankings of the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap 2014 Report published this week. That is big kudos to our friends that consistently support gender inclusive climate policy particularly in the UNFCCC arena.  Do you want to know who joins them in the top 10?  Learn more athttp://forumblog.org/2014/10/top-10-gender-equal-countries-world/

 Best,

Cara Beasley | Coordinator | Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA)
whttp://www.gender-climate.org

 

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Beijing+20: Violence against Women — Don’t miss Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Nicole Kidman and Midori on ending violence against women

 

WM UN Women LOGO

 

MY WORLD OFFLINE SURVEY AT THE DIWALI BAZAAR

 

W orld Youth Foundation’s staffs and volunteers conducted the MY World survey during the recently concluded Diwali Bazaar which was held on 18th October 2014 at King’s Green Hotel, Melaka, Malaysia. The Bazaar was officiated by WYF’s Chairman, Hon Senator Tan Sri (Dr.) Mohd Ali Rustam. Visitors, from all age groups and background to the Bazaar also had a chance to participate in the #MyWorldSurvey. For many of them it was an eye opening survey as they felt that this is the first time the public has a chance to give their inputs for a better world and contribute to the #post2015 agenda.

World Youth Foundation is seeking the of everyone especially Malaysians to support and  disseminate the My World Survey as  widely as possible to get millions of people to VOTE. Together we can make it happen! The more we can engage, the more votes we drive, the more people around the world will participate in shaping the future of development. DON’T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY.

To Vote Click: http://www.myworld2015.org/?partner=wrldyth

WORLD YOUTH FOUNDATION JOINS UNV ONLINE VOLUNTEERING SERVICE 

World Youth Foundation is now a registered organization with UNV Online Volunteering service. The UNV Online Volunteering service connects development organizations and volunteers over the Internet and supports their effective online collaboration. It gives development organizations access to a broader pool of knowledge and resources to enhance their capacities, while it offers individuals worldwide additional opportunities to volunteer for development and contribute to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

YOUTH POLICY MUST BRIDGE GAP BETWEEN ‘HAVES AND HAVE NOTS,’

Deliberations on a modern youth policy framework continued in Azerbaijan’s capital, Baku as hundreds of experts, policymakers, researchers and activists met of a United Nations-backed meeting, which is expected to usher in a set of focused guidelines to assist counties in defining, planning, financing, implementing and evaluating youth policy. On the penultimate day of the First Global Forum on Youth Policy policy experts, youth activists and Government delegations gathered in Baku pressed ahead with efforts to revive commitment to ensuring the nation and international policy frameworks take into account the needs of young people and provide for their participation in decision-making, as set out in the 1995 World Programme of Action on Youth.
Read more here

COME JOIN US AT WORLD YOUTH FOUNDATION AND GAIN AN EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME

Various positions are now available at World Youth Foundation as part of our expanding exercise. We are now accepting applications for various positions (with more to come in the coming months)

We are looking for diverse, highly skilled, dedicated, responsible approachable and compassionate individuals and encourage diversity and community representation.Those applying need to be proficient in English Language, IT savvy and preferable between the ages of 19 – 30 years old.

Come join our team as:

Online and Off-line Full-time Volunteers

Preferred countries (Malaysia) and Global with special focus for volunteers from

United Kingdom, New York, Geneva, Vienna (Austria), Africa (Addis Ababa, Ghana, South Africa) and Asia (Bangkok).

The above positions are non-incentive based. To apply, please fill the Volunteer Form at www.wyf.org.my/index.php/get-involved/volunteering and submit the completed form to wyf@po.jaring.my.

Research and Communication Intern (Part-time / full-time) - Based in the World Youth Foundation Complex in Melaka, Malaysia. To apply, please fill the Internship Form available at http://www.wyf.org.my/index.php/get-involved/internship and submit the completed form to wyf@po.jaring.my.

Campaign Coordinators and Campaign Volunteers for a MY World global campaign.

This is a non-incentive based position open to all Malaysians or those residing in Malaysia. Those interested please email us your name, contact number, complete CV and photo to wyf@po.jaring.my. Those who have applied earlier need not reapply.

COMMONWEALTH THEME FOR 2015: A YOUNG COMMONWEALTH

A Young Commonwealth’ has been chosen as the theme for Commonwealth Day 2015. Announcing the theme, Secretary-General Kamalesh Sharma said: ‘A Young Commonwealth’ recognises the capacity, contribution and potential of young people, particularly in 2015 when the world will define a new global development framework. Commonwealth Day take place each year on the second Monday of March. Celebrations offer an opportunity to promote understanding on global issues, international co-operation and the work of Commonwealth organisations, which aim to improve the lives of citizens. See more here.

THE POST-2015 YOUTH AGENDA: WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?

If the deluge of trend pieces tell us anything, it’s that the millennials are the most fussed over demographic in history. But behind the hype, there is real a tectonic shift. We are now witnessing the largest youth bulge in history. Over half the world’s population is now under thirty, with the majority living in developing and middle-income countries. A youthful population can be source of creativity, innovation and growth -but only if employed and engaged in their societies. Unfortunately, for much of the world’s young people, reality is very different. The longer young people are excluded from participating in their economic and political systems, the further we are from realizing the ‘demographic dividend’.

It’s a no-brainer. A youth agenda, focusing on the issues that affect young people, must be a critical pieceof any post-2015 framework. Where do we start?

View full story.

GLOBAL YOUTH EMPLOYMENT: HOPE IN A BLEAK LANDSCAPE

The International Labor Organisation (ILO) released its latest report on global employment trends and it paints a grim picture of the world’s youth. Over 74.5 million young people are unemployed – a figure more than the entire population of the UK. They are also three times more likely to be unemployed than adults – a ratio that has “reached a historical peak”. 21-year-old Arbie Baguios, who works for UNICEF UK’s Building Young Futures programme, describes his generation’s struggles to find employment.

Read more here

ANGOLA, MALAYSIA, NEW ZEALAND, SPAIN AND VENEZUELA ELECTED TO SERVE ON UN SECURITY COUNCIL

In three rounds of voting the United Nations General Assembly, elected Angola, Malaysia, New Zealand, Spain and Venezuela to serve as non-permanent members on the Security Council for two-year terms beginning on 1 January 2015. The new members will serve on the Council until 31 December 2016. Angola Malaysia, Venezuela and New Zealand were elected in the first vote. The Security Council also recommends to the General Assembly the appointment of the Secretary-General and the admission of new Members to the United Nations. More info here.

THE LAUNCHING OF OWG FINAL REPORT CONSULTATION

As you are probably aware the Member State-led Open Working Group (OWG) on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) released their final report on 19 July 2014.  The full OWG Report is available via the link: http://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/focussdgs.html. The report serves as the main basis for integrating the sustainable development goals into the future development agenda and the Member State negotiations to take place over the next several months.  An e-consultation also has launched on this OWG report, in order to gather your viewpoints and recommendations. To access the consultation, please click on the link www.worldwewant2015.org/inequalities

AGEING POPULATION DOESN’T HAVE TO BE A ‘TIME BOMB’

The catastrophe predicted to result from the rapid ageing of Asian populations is far from inevitable, said experts at a regional conference being held in Thailand recently. Making changes to economic and health policies can help countries head off disaster by minimizing the burdens and maximizing the contributions of older persons, noted attendees at the conference, organized by the HelpAge International with support from UNFPA and the European Union. Over 200 participants from 120 organizations in 29 Asian and Pacific countries are attending the conference to discuss how to respond to the demographic shift. For more information, please click here

CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENCE AND NEGOTIATIONS

Humanity has just about run out of time to address climate change. Scientists have pointed out that a rise in mean surface temperature of 2º Celsius above pre-industrial levels will put the Earth in dangerous, uncharted territory. Yet we currently are on a path toward an increase of 4º or more this century. Either governments will agree to decisive action, as they have promised, or we will look back at 2015 as the year when climate sanity slipped through our fingers. “Climate Change Science and Negotiations” is a two-semester course, with the first semester launching in fall 2014. More info here.

CREATING A JUST AND SUSTAINABLE SYSTEM 

The world’s current energy system – the way we produce, distribute and consume energy – is unsustainable, unjust and harms communities, workers, the environment and the climate. Friends of the Earth International’s new website www.goodenergybadenergy.org explores why a just, sustainable, climate-safe energy system is more urgent than ever.

More info:  http://gebe.foei.org 

DO CITIES WIDEN THE GAP BETWEEN RICH AND POOR?

Why is income inequality greater in big cities? “At least one-quarter of the increase in earnings inequality in the US during 1979-2007 is explained by the high growth of earnings inequality in large urban areas,” write Kristian Behrens and Frédéric Robert-Nicoud. Read their piece on social fairness and “superstar cities” at  http://wef.ch/1taPkKq 

DO YOU CARRY A PLAN FOR SOCIAL CHANGE?

OECD YOUNG PROFESSIONALS PROGRAMME 2015

A kanthari is a small but very spicy chili plant that grows wild in every backyard in Kerala and confers a number of medicinal values. A kanthari is symbolic of those who have the courage, passion, creativity and vision to challenge the status quo and implement positive change. A kanthari represents a motivated problem solver, someone who emerges from the margins of society.The intake process for the 2015 #kanthari course is going on in full swing. In order to reach more applicants, please help by printing the flyer that can be downloaded on the following link and hang it up in a place where many people can see it. Of course sharing this post will also help tremendously! Thank you for your support! http://media.kanthari.org/pdf/en/kanthari-flyer.pdf

APPLY FOR THE UNITED NATIONS DEMOCRACY FUND

The United Nations Democracy Fund (UNDEF) invites civil society organizations to apply for funding for projects to advance and support democracy. Project proposals may be submitted on-line between 15 November 2014 and 31 December 2014 at www.un.org/democracyfund. You can find guidelines FAQs and lessons learned from previous rounds at http://www.un.org/democracyfund/application-materials.

Only on-line applications in either English or French will be accepted.  

OECD YOUNG PROFESSIONALS PROGRAMME 2015

The OECD Young Professionals Programme (YPP) brings talented entry-level professionals from diverse backgrounds into the OECD. The OECD Young Professionals Programme invites graduates interested in international policy co-operation to pick three job assignments and apply for position in PARIS. You can see the full list of assignments here. It is recommended that you choose the assignments that are suiting you the most and in which assignment you are eligible in, because they are different requirements for every selected task.  You can only choose three job assignments.

More info here.

EVENTS

6th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON YOUTH AND INTERFAITH DIALOGUE

Website: www.interfaithdialogueconference.org

1st ASIA -PACIFIC REGIONAL SPACE GENERATION WORKSHOP (AP-SGW) 2014

Website: http://spacegeneration.org/index.php/en/eventstopics/ap-sgw-2014

KOREA-ASEAN COOPERATION PROJECT (KACP) ON EDUCATION AND EXCHANGE

PROGRAM FOR YOUNG SCHOLARS IN WOMEN’S STUDIES (PHASE 2)

Website: http://www.aaws07.org

GENEVA NGO FORUM FOR THE BEIJING+20 UNECE REGIONAL REVIEW

Website: http://beijing20.unwomen.org

YOUTH WORK WEEK 2014: “YOUTH EMPOWERMENT THROUGH SOFT SKILLS”

Website: http://www.nya.org.uk/supporting-youth-work/youth-work-week

XY CONGRESS 2014

Website:  https://www.gtcbio.com/register/xy-congress?utm_source=newsletter2&utm_medium=xy&utm_campaign=xy14I 

NATIONAL YOUTH COUNCIL OF IRELAND ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2014

Website: www.youth.ie

WORLD CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, ORGANIZED BY UNESCO

Website: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/education/events/calendar-of-events/education-global-conferences

18th IUSTI ASIA PACIFIC CONFERENCE

Website: www.iusti2014bangkok.com/cms

7th WORLD YOUTH CONGRESS

Website: http://peacechild.org/world-youth-congress

BEYOND 2015 COPENHAGEN CSO CONFERENCE

Website:http://www.beyond2015.org/copenhagen-conference-2014

WORLD CONFERENCE ON SCİENCE AND MATHEMATİCS EDUCATION

Website: www.sci-math.org

6th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON YOUTH AND INTERFAITH DIALOGUE

Website: www.interfaithdialogueconference.org

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON AGRICULTURE, BIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (ICABES’14)

Website: http://iaast.org/2014/12/09/48

GOI PEACE FOUNDATION FORUM 2014 “TOWARD A NEW HEART-BASED CIVILIZATION”

Website: http://www.goipeace.or.jp/english/activities/lectures/lectures1411_01.html

ISF 2014, 2nd INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC FORUM

Website: www.isforum.us

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EARTH, ENVIRONMENT AND LIFE SCIENCES (EELS-2014)

Website: http://www.iicbe.org/2014/12/24/53

7TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH

Website: http://www.icer14.jerad.org

ELEVENTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENTAL, CULTURAL, ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL SUSTAINABILITY

Website: http://onsustainability.com/copenhagen-2015

7th WORLD CONFERENCE ON EDUCATIONAL SCIENCES

Website: www.wces.info

THE 2015 SOCIAL FORUM

Website : http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Poverty/SForum/Pages/SForumIndex.aspx

7th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE: IMPACTS AND RESPONSES

Website: http://on-climate.com/the-conference-2015

HUMANITY IN ACTION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS

Website: http://www.humanityinaction.org/pages/91-call-for-applications

14TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MOBILITY AND TRANSPORT FOR ELDERLY AND DISABLED PERSONS

Website: http://www.transed2015.com

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Recap of September 24 – #MDG456Liv​e conversati​ons on women & children during the UN General Assembly

For a better viewing experience, click here

September 21-26, 2014
Powered by FHI 360, Girls’ Globe,
Johnson & Johnson & Women Deliver

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— BEYOND THE HEADLINES —

THE SITUATION IN SYRIA
PROVIDING MEDICAL RELIEF DURING CONFLICT       

WM foreign policy group banner                

— BEYOND THE HEADLINES —

THE SITUATION IN SYRIA
PROVIDING MEDICAL RELIEF DURING CONFLICT 

WM Foreign P event

Dr. Deane Marchbein
Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières

Now into its fourth year, the war in Syria has killed more than 150,000 people and driven an estimated 9 million people from their homes. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been working on the ground in Syria and in neighboring countries since the onset of the conflict, first supporting medical facilities with supplies, then establishing independent facilities. Unable to receive permission from Damascus to work in Syria, teams set up projects in opposition-held areas, primarily in the country’s northern border regions. All told, MSF teams in Syria had conducted more than 7,000 surgeries, 54,000 emergency room interventions, and 88,000 outpatient consultations. In addition to responding to mass casualty events, medical teams have also offered services ranging from primary health to maternal to chronic disease care.

Dr. Deane Marchbein, joined Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières in 2006 to work as an anesthesiologist in MSF’s surgical program in Ivory Coast and now serves as president of MSF-USA Board of Directors. She has recently worked with MSF in Afghanistan, Syria, and Lebanon. She served as an anesthesiologist with MSF in Democratic Republic of Congo, Haiti, Libya, Nigeria, South Sudan, Afghanistan, and Syria, and as a medical doctor in Libya and Lebanon. She was formerly the business manager and chairperson of the anesthesia department as well as the director of the intensive care unit at Lawrence General Hospital in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Dr. Marchbein now works for Massachusetts General Hospital and the Cambridge Health Alliance.

Thursday, November 13, 2014, 12:30 p.m.
Luncheon and Program

Institute of International Education
809 UN Plaza, 12th Floor
(1st Ave., between 45th & 46th)
New York, NY
 

Space is limited. Advance registration is required.

Click here to register

WFPG Members — $25      Non-Members — $40

Checks should be made payable to: WFPG, 1615 M St, NW, Suite 210, Washington, DC 20036. Cancellations must be made
two business days in advance or you will be held responsible for the fee. Please direct any questions to 202-429-2692 or
programs@wfpg.org. 

 

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OWG Final Report Consultation Reminder: 8 Days Left!

Dear AINA Members,


This is a reminder that the consultation on the recently released Open Working Group’s Report on the Sustainable Development Goals is currently underway and can be found here:
www.worldwewant2015.org/inequalities
The consultation is intended to gather and summarize your specific viewpoints on the OWG Report. The results of the consultation will be made available for all interested parties, including member state representatives, to reference and learn from during the deliberations process.
The consultation ends on 15 October, 2014.
We look forward to your continued recommendations and contributions to the consultation as well as the Post-2015 process.


Sincerely,


Tricia Callender
Addressing Inequalities Networked Alliance (AINA) Manager
tcallender@unicef.org
This message was sent by: Inequalities Consultation,
inequalities@worldwewant2015.org, World We Want 2015, 304 East 45th Street, New York, NY 10017

 

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UN Women     updates on the Beijing+20 campaign.

WOMEN DELIVER

View this email in your browser.

UN WOMEN

Beijing+20: Women and Poverty — Don’t miss Nobel Peace Laureate Professor Muhammad Yunus, infographic on poverty and more

Website: English | Español | Français

View this     email in your browser

WM UN WOMEN Banner EN

 

11 October is the International #dayofthegirl! Get facts & stories here:

http://owl.li/Cp1tK

 

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WM UN WOMEN

Deadline approaching for CSW59 [Commission on the Status of Women] written statements

Subject: Deadline approaching for CSW59 written statements
To: UN Women CSW <csw@unwomen.org>
Dear ECOSOC-accredited NGOs,

Please note that the deadline for submission of written statements for CSW59 is COB 24 October 2014.  The submission of written statements is open through CSO-Net athttp://esango.un.org/irene/?page=viewStatements&nr=24923&type=8&section=8 . Statements sent by e-mail cannot be accepted.

Pre-registration will begin on 11 November 2014. In preparation for the session, we ask you to ensure that your organization’s contact data in iCSO is current and complete:http://esango.un.org/civilsociety/login.do

The event page for CSW59 is available in CSO-net at http://esango.un.org/irene/?page=viewContent&nr=24923&type=8&section=8

Best regards,

UN Women Civil Society Section

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Join live-streatmed launch of Gender and Social Inclusion Toolbox on 15 October

 Dear Colleagues,

You are invited to join the live-streamed launch of Gender and Social Inclusion Toolbox on International Day of Rural Women (15 October)!  More information posted here and below. 

Download official event invitation and share with friends, colleagues and networks.

Regards,

Cara

The CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) Gender and Equity theme is, together with the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), organising a special event on Wednesday 15 October, looking at the development and use of gender-sensitive approaches in the context of climate change and agriculture research.

The event will launch a Gender & Inclusion Toolbox: Participatory Research in Climate Change & Agriculture. The toolbox is a participatory methodology guide on how to create socially differentiated research for climate adaptation and mitigation projects.

The event will feature speakers from ICRAF, CCAFS, CARE International, and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), all involved in the development of the Gender Toolbox.

How to join online?

The event will be live-streamed to a global audience between 10:00-12:00 am East Africa Time [8:00-09:00 UK Time]. There will be opportunities to ask questions to the presenters via online chat using #gendertoolbox during the seminar.

To get a reminder about the live-stream and to express your interest in joining, email Risper Nyairo: r.nyairo[at]cgiar.org.

 The web stream will be available on ICRAF’s live-stream page.

 Interested in joining in person?

The launch will take place at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), in Nairobi, Kenya, in the Conference Hall. After the presentations, onsite participants will be able to join a Gender Networking Lunch. The afternoon will include fun games, activities and challenges, all reflecting on the value of gender and social differentiation in agriculture and climate change programming.

Program outline [in East Africa Time]

- 10:00-12:00 Livestreamed launch of Gender Toolbox 

- 12:00-13:30 Gender Networking Lunch for onsite participants

- 13:30-15:30 Gender and Social inclusion discussions and games.

Learn more about the Gender Toolbox: Coming soon: a gender and climate change manual made by many

Reserve your seat by 8 October by sending an email to Risper Nyairo:r.nyairo[at]cgiar.org. Please indicate name, number of attendees, organization and contact information.

More information about the presentations, featured speakers and outline of the meeting will soon be posted here!

 There is a need to move beyond an ‘add women and stir’ approach to climate change and development is imperative if we are to create relevant and useful gender-sensitive knowledge for a climate-resilient future. Therefore, join the gender-discussions on 15 October!

The event is carried out in collaboration with CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) Gender and Equity Theme, CARE International, and World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF).

The Toolbox has been put to the test. Learn more from this blog.

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World Survey on the Role of Women in Development 2014: Gender Equality and Sustainable Development

Dear Community of Educators,

An update from our GGCA colleagues… UN Women recently released its new report, the World Survey on the Role of Women in Development 2014: Gender Equality and Sustainable Development. Charting the rationale and the actions necessary to ensure ground-breaking change, the flagship UN study asserts that any comprehensive sustainable development pathway cannot be achieved without an explicit commitment to gender equality, women’s rights and their empowerment. Coming on the heels of the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Summit in September, the World Survey 2014 provides an in-depth analysis of sustainable development issues, the challenges and the solutions, through a gender lens.

See the announcement: http://www.unwomen.org/en/news/stories/2014/10/world-survey-2014-press-release

Download the Report:http://www.unwomen.org/~/media/headquarters/attachments/sections/library/publications/2014/unwomen_surveyreport_advance_16oct.pdf

All the best,

Pam Puntenney & Bremley Lyngdoh

UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs

Co-Coordinators Climate Change

Dr. P. J. Puntenney

Environmental & Human Systems Management

1989 West Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA

E-mail:  pjpunt@umich.edu

Cell:  (734) 352 7429

Landline: (734) 994-3612

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Call for Contributions: Women’s Leadership in Risk Resilient Development

Do you have good practices on Women’s Leadership in Risk Resilient
Development? Consider sharing your good practices to be published and presented at the World Conference for Disaster Risk Reduction in Sendai,
Japan in March 2015 – learn more at http://www.wcdrr.org. UNISDR is planning to produce a compilation of good practices on “Women’s
Leadership in Risk Resilient Development”. They are looking for examples of
projects and initiatives across humanitarian, environmental and development
sectors that h2748
Mobile: +66 (0)89 201 9787
Email: cocchiglia@un.orgave promoted positive changes to how women and men’s
capabilities are used to build resilience to disasters and climate change.
Attached is a copy of the call for contributions and the guidelines for
submission.  The deadline for submissions is Friday 7th November 2014.
Afterwards, all entries will be reviewed to identify about 10-12 good
practices to be included in the final publication.
Please direct questions to Feng Min at kanf@un.org.
Send all entries to Mr. Michele Cocchiglia, Regional Programme officer,
UNISDR at cocchiglia@un.org or the following address:
Michele Cocchiglia (Mr.)
Regional Programme Officer
United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) UNESCAP
Secretariat Building – 7th Floor, Block B Rajdamnern Nok Avenue -
Bangkok, 10200 THAILAND
Office: +66 (0)2 288

 

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Climate change for Indigenous women

Dear all

Please find following an opinion pice from Alina Saba on the relevance of the Climate Summit for Indigenous Women. Please share and consider commenting at the HP to show support for these kind of opinions from grassroots women getting media space.

Thanks Kate

“Alina Saba”

Daily update ⋅ September 27, 2014

NEWS

What Climate Change Means for Indigenous Peoples

Huffington Post

When I was born in an Indigenous Limbu village of Eastern Nepal, no one had heard of climate change. Our communities struggled to make their …

You have received this email because you have subscribed to Google Alerts

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UM WOMEN LOGO

 

CALL FOR GLOBAL WEEK OF ACTION, OCTOBER 11TH -18TH, 2014

#BRINGBACK OURGIRLS NOW AND ALIVE!!!!

Dear friends,

Please find attached the CALL FOR GLOBAL WEEK OF ACTION, OCTOBER 11TH -18TH, 2014 #BRINGBACKOURGIRLS  NOW and ALIVE!!!!

******** Please share widely with your networks. ********

 Many thanks,

UN Women Civil Society Section

 CALL FOR GLOBAL WEEK OF ACTION – BBOG

 

PEACE WOMEN:

PeaceWomen E-news: People Demand Climate Justice

PeaceWomen E-news: People Demand Climate Justice

View it in your browser

 

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On the road to Lima, what is the status of gender equality in current UNFCCC decisions? NEW POLICY GUIDE

October 15, 2014

Dear friends,

As the UNFCCC works towards a new climate agreement at COP21 in Paris next year, WEDO is working alongside many countries championing gender equality as a key element of the new agreement. In addition, Parties and key stakeholders from the Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA) and the Women and Gender Constituency (WGC) continue to build the foundation for advancing the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of current gender mandates in UNFCCC decisions across all areas of the negotiations.

To support these efforts, WEDO, in partnership with the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN)- Global Gender Office, and on behalf of the GGCA, is pleased to share a new policy guide for preparation towards December’s COP20 in Peru, outlining all “Existing Mandates and Entry Points for Gender Equality” in current UNFCCC decisions and conclusions.

Available in English and Spanish, and soon in French, this technical guide was developed to support decision-makers, negotiators and advocates in mapping current decisions that contain specific references to gender equality (e.g. in relation to gender balance or gender-sensitive approaches) across all main areas of the negotiations. This mapping further serves to support users in more effectively monitoring the implementation of gender-sensitive climate change policies and actions at all levels.

DOWNLOAD [English] [Spanish]

WM BLEU BANNER LOGOunnamed

The compilation highlights a strong foundation for gender-sensitive climate policy, with gender referenced across 32 current decisions related to adaptation, mitigation, technology, finance, capacity building, and loss and damage, as well as current conclusions in agriculture. This includes the often cited Decision 23/CP.18 that established a standing agenda item on gender and climate change at the COP. The upcoming COP20 in Lima, Peru is a pivotal point for the UNFCCC, where Parties have an opportunity to provide the overarching guidance and framework for implementing these gender-related mandates by ensuring:

1) Gender equality is reflected as a guiding principle and cross-cutting element for all actions in the new climate agreement,

2) Progress is made  under the Standing Agenda item on Gender and Climate Change to establish a framework for action to advance implementation of gender-sensitive climate policy.

Progress and Gaps

In addition to a compilation of text, the guide provides an overview analysis of progress and gaps for gender-sensitive climate policy, for example:

  • Out of 32 current decisions that reference gender, 5 explicitly refer only to gender balance and enhancing women’s participation on boards and bodies. A further 8 decisions recognize both the need for gender balance and a gender-sensitive approach.
  • Adaptation is so far the area in which the most robust gender-sensitive language has been integrated, with a total of 10 decisions integrating gender references.
  • Out of the main areas of negotiations (adaptation, mitigation, finance, technology and capacity-building) mitigation has the lowest number of decisions that reference gender, with no guiding mandate for gender-sensitive mitigation actions. Gender considerations are only included in relation to REDD+ and response measures, with the latter only referring to women as a “vulnerable group”.
  • While mandates on paper are crucial, mitigating and adapting to climate change in a gender-transformative manner requires that the full and appropriate implementation of these policies is realized. Implementation lags behind, even in meeting gender balance goals, which jeopardizes potential impact: the current composition of UNFCCC boards and bodies, for example, which are explicitly mandated to target gender balance, especially via Decision 23/CP.18, remains notably inequitable. (See graph below)

 WM GENDER 408 BLEU LOGO 

Please help us to share this compilation through the below sample tweets:

  • NEW policy guide on gender equality mandates in the #UNFCCC by @WEDO_Worldwide @IUCN_Gender @GGCA_Gender http://ow.ly/CNscF #ADP #COP20
  • Need a review of decisions on #gender in the #UNFCCC? Read a full compilation here http://ow.ly/CNscF #ADP #COP20
  • NUEVA Guía política mandatos de igualdad de género en el #UNFCCC @WEDO_Worldwide @IUCN_Gender http://ow.ly/CNt9w  #ADP #COP20
  • How is gender equality being integrated into climate change policy? Find out here: http://ow.ly/CNscF #ADP #COP20

For more information on this, please contact Bridget Burns, bridget[at]wedo.org.

Stay Connected

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Subject: [WomenGenderConstituency] Women’s ‘Call to March’ at People’s Climate March To: womengenderconstituency the September 21st womengenderconstituency@googlegroups.com

 

 WomenCall to March_FINAL Sept2

Hello all,
Apologies for the long email, please read!
As many of you know from e-mails and from our last Constituency meeting, based here in NY, WEDO has been working with many partners to organize a women’s contingent for the People’s Climate March, and we know many of you will be in NY at that time.
To support mobilization, we have drafted a ‘Call to March’ for the Women’s Organizing Table, which we have this week started circulating to partners for feedback and participation. This is not a position paper or statement, but simply a call to showcase the multitude of women’s groups, organizations and individuals joining the March and frame some collective solidarity of women marching together for climate justice. Though we did aim to echo some sentiments in the recent PreCOP statement.
The aim of the Call is to be concise, inspiring and inclusive, something which speaks to national women’s organizations in the U.S. as well as international partners working on climate change. The National Organization of Women (NOW) in the US has already indicated they would like to join the call.
We see this as an important moment, particularly for movement building in the United States. Already we are seeing tons of articles on how the U.S. will push for an accord in lieu of a treaty in the UNFCCC, in order to ensure something which would not need Congressional approval. There is a need for momentum building on this issue, and at a moment when racial, sexual, gender and economic injustice is so fiercely part of our national dialogue, it seems pressing to harness an opportunity for mobilization.
We aim to translate this call and have it live online for individuals and organizations to join. 
I share today for your feedback on whether -as individuals or organizations (or as a Constituency)-you/we would like to join this ‘Call to March’. 
PLEASE let me know of any feedback by Thursday, September 4th.
The Women’s Table is working to coordinate a space for women’s groups to assemble the morning of the March, info will be posted on www.peoplesclimate.org/women. Additionally for more regular updates you can join the PCM Women’s Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/pcmwomen/
Finally, in addition to this more general call, I would also like your feedback on whether as a Constituency, we should perhaps think of tying our recent statement into some specific messaging for the March, having the Constituency represented with a call for ‘System Change not Climate Change” or with signs stating our positions on corporate capture, etc. There is an art space in Brooklyn providing free space to make art so we could consider that kind of representation.
Best,
Bridget K. Burns
Advocacy and Communications Director 
Women’s Environment & Development Organization (WEDO)
skype: bridget.k.burns
P Please consider the environment before printing this email

–  ck our work at web sites..***web del MUSEO AJA LINK: http://www.museoaja.org The wikipedia page for SIGLO XXIII is up. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siglo_XXIII,   The museo aha is already on Wikipedia as well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Museo_Aja, in spanish:http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Museo_Aja.       marta benavides– SIGLO XXIII   EL SALVADOR — TEL 503-7904-9886

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[AYAPA] 289,126 YOUNG PEOPLE’S VOTES FOR AFRICA / All Genders / All Education Levels / Age Group (16-30)

 

Inline images 2

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“Call For Input” RIO+FANRPA​N Partnershi​p on Gender and CSa and Invitation to Participat​e in our survey

Dear Colleagues:
The World Centre for Sustainable Development (The RIO+ Centre ) and the  Food and Agriculture Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) would like to receive inputs from stakeholders in the five countries targeted by our project on Gender and Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA). The five countries are: Lesotho, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
We have partnered in order to strengthen social outcomes of green growth and climate-smart solutions, such as climate-smart agriculture, at the national and local level.
Your answers will inform the Gender and CSA Assessment being implemented by the RIO+ as well as a Gender and CSA Strategy. These two major outputs from our partnership are intended to inform FANRPAN ‘s and national programming on CSA as well as RIO+ advocacy on sustainable development.
The survey will only take 20 minutes of your time and will close on August 29th, 2014.
If you have already been contacted, there is no need to complete the survey a second time.
Please email Leisa Perch, Project Manager, at leisa.perch@undp.org, copying Rosaly Byrd at rbyrd@ucsd.edu  for more information regarding the survey and to receive the hyper-link to the webpage.
We look forward to sharing the results soon thereafter.
Best regards
Leisa Perch
Policy Specialist/Project Manager – RIO+/FANRPAN Partnership Project
RIO+ Centre
The RIO+ Centre: One of the most important legacies of the RIO+20 Conference, was the launching of the “World Centre for Sustainable Development – The RIO+ Centre”. A partnership of the Government of Brazil and the United Nations Development Programme, based in Rio de Janeiro, we were established in 2013. We work to re-affirm and make actionable the inextricable link between social, economic and environmental policies for the achievement of sustainable development and human wellbeing.
 
Our partnership with FANRPAN, one of our first, targets the social dimensions of climate and agricultural policy by identifying ways to improve, support and enable  innovations for sustainability that create social as well as environmental and economic benefits.
signatureFANRPAN Logo edited

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Beijing+20 NGO Review Forum – Invitation to participat​e

Take place between 3-5 November 2014 at the Palais des Nations, Geneva.

Dear Friends and Colleagues,
The UNECE ahead of its Inter- Governmental Forum, mandated the NGO Committee on the Status of Women in Geneva to organize the NGO review Forum.  This forum is expected to bring together Civil societies and NGOs to contribute to the discussions and bring grass roots women’s voices on achievements made, remaining gaps and challenges on the implementation of the 12 critical areas of concern of the 1995 Beijing Platform for Action (BPfA).  As well as on emerging issues that affect women. The outcome of this NGO forum will feed into the UNECE Social Forum in November.  This NGO Forum Beijing +20 review for the 56 countires in the ECE region is scheduled to take place between 3-5 November 2014 at the Palais des Nations, Geneva.
They are reaching out to all CSOs and NGOs working on any aspect of  Sustainable Development and the Environment in the region to participate in this forum. Your assistance in sharing this invitation widely within your network will be appreciated.  You may wish to visit the dedicated website to learn more about this forum or click on the links below for some of these documents.
Financial support is available for some selected countries from the ECE region. This support is provided by the Canton of Geneva (which overseas Geneva International Cooperation) as part of its policies in support of international solidarity.   Please feel free to contact us for more information on the registration and/or your participation.
The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), is comprised of 56 countries (www.unece.org):
Albania,Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands,  Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, The former YugoslavRepublic of Macedonia, Turkey,Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United – Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America, Uzbekistan.
Looking forward to your participation.
Shared by
Lorena Aguilar R.
Global Senior Gender Adviser
International Union for the Conservation of Nature
1630 Connecticut Ave NW - Suite 300 Washington, DC 20009
Mobile: +16155212523
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell:  (734) 330-0238
Voice/Fax: (734) 994-3612

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Climate Blog – Road to Paris

Interesting insights from ICSU (International Council for Scientific Unions)

Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell:  (734) 330-0238
Voice/Fax: (734) 994-3612
When climate blog Road to Paris asked people who they’d like to hear more from on climate and sustainability issues, some simply replied women. So here is their list of 20 women making waves in the climate change debate. http://roadtoparis.info/top-list/20-women-making-waves-climate-change-debate/
When we asked people who they’d like to hear more from on climate and…

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New! Training Manual and Training Video on Social and Gender Equity in the Context of Forests and Climate Change

Dear GGCA Colleagues,
Fellow GGCA member RECOFTC shares exciting news of a new training video and manual focusing on Gender Equity in the Context of Forests and Climate Change.  Thank you Bhawana Upadhyay for sharing!
Best regards,
Cara
 
Training Video Explains Gender Equity in the Context of Forests and Climate Change

Recently produced by USAID-funded programs Grassroots Equity and Enhanced Networks in Mekong (GREEN Mekong) and Lowering Emissions in Asia’s Forests program (USAID-LEAF), the training video targets community forestry practitioners to improve gender equity on the ground. The video explains the concept of gender equity in the context of forest communities and highlights best practices for achieving gender equity.

The video is informed by the case study produced by RECOFTC – Gender and community forests in a changing landscape: Lessons from Ban Thung Yao, Thailand with best practices highlighted from a joint study produced by Women Organizing for Change in Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (WOCAN), the United Nations Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (UN-REDD) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) funded Lowering Emissions in Asia’s Forests (USAID-LEAF) project.

Please click here or view the video at http://www.recoftc.org/site/resources/A-Fair-Climate-Gender-Equity-in-REDD-.php

Training Manual Launched to Improve Social Equity in Forests and Climate Change Context

The training manual on improving grassroots equity in the forests and climate change context, aims to develop the knowledge and capacity needed among grassroots facilitators to implement genuinely participatory processes for improving grassroots equity in forest-based climate change policy frameworks, mechanisms and initiatives.

It is based on the principle that grassroots stakeholders must be engaged in the decision-making processes for setting national policies and for designing and planning programmes. Grassroots stakeholders need to have meaningful opportunities to participate and their perspectives must be heard at all levels of the forests and climate change discourse to achieve more equitable outcomes.

While most of the existing REDD+ related training manuals focus on the theoretical concepts around forests, climate change and REDD+. This training manual provides guidance to train grassroots facilitators to better engage all stakeholders and to promote equity in forest-based climate change and forest management practices and interventions. Its main premise is to extend the practice and process of active participation towards effective engagement, through which equity can be improved.

RECOFTC – The Center for People and Forests  P.O. Box 1111, Kasetsart Post Office, Bangkok 10903 Thailand Email: bhawana.upadhyay@recoftc.org Website: www.recoftc.org
Cara Beasley Communications and Network Officer, Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA) Email:  cara@gender-climate.org Web: www.gender-climate.org Skype: cara.beasley Twitter: @GGCA_gender

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Voorbeeld van bijlage WomensMobilizing_FLYER.pdf weergeven

WomensMobilizing_FLYER.pdf
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WM diseno-boletin

Open Letter Of Bolivian Chancellor on SDGs – Carta Abierta Canciller de Bolivia sobre ODS

Having trouble reading this email? View it in your browser.   /     Problemas para leer el correo electrónico? Véalo en su navegador.

From: Silvia Ribeiro <silvia@etcgroup.org>     To: Women Major Group Listserve <women_major_group@googlegroups.com>

Subject: {Women_Major_Group} Open Letter Of Bolivian Chancellor on SDGs – Carta Abierta Canciller de Bolivia sobre ODS

I am forwarding the letter sent by Bolivia demanding to integrate respect for Mother Earth and harmony with Nature in the SDGs.
They are asking organizations for support signatures: adhesion.madretierra@gmail.com
The letter is in Spanish and English
Greetings,
Silvia
CALLE MÉNDEZ ARCOS # 776 ZONA SOPOCACHI.TELEF: +(591)-2-2148365
LA PAZ – BOLIVIA

WWW.UCORDILLERA.EDU.BO
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UN Women Sets 2030 “Expiratio​n Date” for Gender Inequality

From: WUNRN LISTSERVE <wunrn1@gmail.com>
Subject: [WUNRN] UN Women Sets 2030 “Expiration Date” for Gender Inequality
To: WUNRN ListServe <WUNRN_LISTSERVE@lists.wunrn.com>

WUNRN

http://www.wunrn.com 

https://www.devex.com/news/gender-inequality-s-2030-expiration-date-83773 

UN Women Sets 2030 “Expiration Date” for Gender Inequality

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, executive director of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women address journalists during a press briefing on the 20th anniversary of the Fourth World Conference on Women, which was held in Beijing in September 1995. Photo by: Evan Schneider / U.N. 

By Jenni Cardamone - 27 June 2014

Almost two decades after 189 governments made a historic commitment in China to a world of equality between women and men, it’s time to discuss progress made and challenges ahead.

U.N. Women hosted on Thursday in New York a public event to launch their year-long campaign to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the historic 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, where tens of thousands of government, NGO and private sector officials produced the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, a document lauded as visionary for its time and which today continues to pave the way for women’s empowerment and gender equality.

“Progress has been made — but we need more, and faster,” Mlambo-Ngcuka said. She pointed out, there is still “unfinished business” in the 12 critical areas of concern for women that were laid out in Beijing.  For instance, although the prevalence of female genital mutilation has declined, 30 million girls are still at risk in the next decade. Likewise, 35 percent of women around the world today have experienced some type of physical or sexual violence, according to a recent report by the World Health Organization.

“We are giving gender inequality an expiration date,” Mlambo-Ngcuka said, adding that men and boys must join the conversation and citing U.N. Women’s He For She campaign.

At the event, other participants, like U.N. Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson, reminded participants that the essence of the Beijing vision is to build a better world for all of us, not just women and girls: “Remember, nobody can do everything, but everybody can do something.”

Eliasson pointed out how even today only 21.8 percent of parliamentarian worldwide are women. One of them is Ine Eriksen Soreide, the Norwegian minister of defense, who cited her country as an example for gender equality.

“We have full participation of women in all sectors of society — and that is why we are a wealthy country,” Soreide said.

Gloria Steinem, a well-known U.S. advocate for women’s empowerment, noted that “we can’t be separated from the mainstream, we are the mainstream” and stressed that “the human race is like a bird with two wings. If one wing is broken, no one can fly.”

So how do we move forward and put the principles laid out in the Beijing Declaration to action? It’s time to implement, according to Greta Gunnarsdottir, permanent representative of Iceland — another world leader on gender equality — to the United Nations. “Let’s move gender equality to the top of the global agenda,” she said.

To contact the list administrator, send a message to WUNRN_LISTSERVE-owner@lists.wunrn.com
- To unsubscribe send a message to: imail@lists.wunrn.com, with the message: unsubscribe WUNRN_LISTSERVE
                       

ck our work at web sites..***web del MUSEO AJA LINK: http://www.museoaja.org
The wikipedia page for SIGLO XXIII is up. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siglo_XXIII,
The museo aha is already on Wikipedia as well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Museo_Aja, in spanish: http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Museo_Aja.

marta benavides– SIGLO XXIII   EL SALVADOR — TEL 503-7904-9886 

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Upcoming Event on Gender and REDD+ in Indonesia

Dear Colleagues, 

In follow up to my e-mail below, I just wanted to share with you some information on the discussions and outcomes of the seminar that was held in Jakarta, Indonesia on 17 June on  “Achieving Gender Equality in REDD+ Implementation”. 

The participants discussed the necessity of promoting the equal participation of women in forest management schemes, and proposed various strategies for the expansion of women’s roles within REDD+ institutions, programmes and projects. They also emphasized the need for greater collaboration between stakeholders in order to mitigate existing challenges to the full inclusion of women in Indonesia’s pursuit of sustainable growth and equity.  

More information and details of the event, including speaker presentations and a summary report, can be found on the UNORCID website located here.” 

Many thanks and all the best,

Elizabeth 

From: Elizabeth Eggerts <elizabeth.eggerts@undp.org>
Subject: [GGCA] Upcoming Event on Gender and REDD+ in Indonesia
 

Dear Colleagues, 

I just wanted to pass some information along regarding an upcoming seminar being held in Jakarta, Indonesia on 17 June 2014 on the topic of “Achieving Gender Equality in REDD+”.  The event is being co-hosted by Indonesia’s Ministry for Women Empowerment and Child Protection, BP REDD+, the United Nations Office for REDD+ Coordination in Indonesia (UNORCID) and UN Women.  It aims to highlight the relevance of gender to REDD+ and to discuss strategic actions that can be taken to mainstream gender within REDD+ implementation. The event will be tweeted live, and discussions can be followed on Twitter at @UNORCID. 

More information on the event can be found here: http://bit.ly/1oTUARU 

Media Advisory for the event can be found here: http://bit.ly/1xXWW8s 

A report will also be prepared on the event and will be uploaded to the UNORCID website (http://www.unorcid.org/). 

Many thanks and all the best,

Elizabeth 

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UNFCCC Women and Gender Constituen​cy Website

Hello all,

You are invited to check out the new UNFCCC Women and Gender Constituency website: http://womengenderclimate.org/, which we formally launched here in Bonn!
You will find all the interventions delivered by the WGC in the ‘Resources’ tab, as well as some updates on actions over the last two weeks– though we hope to add even more in the coming days.
We hope to take the next few weeks to test and improve the site, including a gallery of photos and videos of statements.
Best,
Bridget K. Burns
Advocacy and Communications Director 
Women’s Environment & Development Organization (WEDO)
skype: bridget.k.burns

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Internatio​nal Photo (with Story) Competitio​n on Forests and Agricultur​e through a Gender Lens – Deadline June 15, 2014

 

From our Global Gender Climate Alliance [GGCA] partner, please share with your colleagues and networks.

All the best,
Pam
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Dear GGCA Colleagues,
Purabi Bose, of CGIAR/CIAT, shares an exciting opportunity to tell our best Forests and Agriculture stories through a Gender Lens in a photo competition (below).  
Entries are due by 15 June 2014.
 Announcements and further information is also available in the links that follow: Announcement in
English: http://dapa.ciat.cgiar.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Photo-Competition_Anno uncement_EN_PBose-2014.pdf Announcement in
Spanish: http://dapa.ciat.cgiar.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Photo-Competition_Anno uncement_ES_PBose-2014.pdf Announcement in
French: http://dapa.ciat.cgiar.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Photo-Competition_Anno uncement_FR_PBose-2014-.pdf Announcement in Bahasa Indonesia: http://dapa.ciat.cgiar.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Photo-Competition_Anno uncement_Ind_PBose-2014.pdf I encourage you to participate and share a photo story or
2.  Please consider cc’ing me if you submit photo, I would like to showcase your entry whether it makes the top 100 or not! Best regards, Cara Cara Beasley Communications and Network Officer, Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA)
Skype: cara.beasley Twitter: @GGCA_gender

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—–Original Message—– From: Bose, Purabi (CIAT) [mailto:p.bose@cgiar.org]  Sent: Saturday, May 10, 2014 1:45 PM To: cara@gender-climate.org Cc: sachi94@gmail.comftagenderphoto@gmail.com Subject: Reminder: International Photo (with Story) Competition on Forests

and Agriculture through a Gender Lens
Dear All:

Kind reminder to participate in the International Photo Competition (Photo with a Story) on Forests and Agriculture through a Gender Lens. Submit your contribution before June 15, 2014.

A wonderful opportunity for institutes and individuals to showcase their work on gender through photos and stories (success and/or failure) on broad theme of agriculture and forests. The selected photos with stories will be published in the Photo Book, and there are many more awards. Anyone can participate across globe.
For more information, kindly refer attachments of the photo competition announcements in four PDFs – each in English, Spanish, French, and Bahasa Indonesia languages.
Feel free to circulate this link among your colleagues at your institute and among your wider partner institute networks http://dapa.ciat.cgiar.org/international-photo-competition_purabi-bose/
We look forward to receive your contribution. Thank you.
Purabi.

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Seeking Media Intern

Dear Colleagues,
Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) Seeking Social Media Intern
Be a part of a dynamic network of women leaders working on the front lines of climate change action and solutions.
To learn more go to:www.wecaninternational.org  We are ramping up for events in NYC for the UN Climate Summit, the release of the Women’s Climate Action Agenda and other key events this year.
WECAN is seeking a savvy social media intern based in the U.S. who can commit 10 to 15 hours a week for 3 to 4 months (possibly more).
You will need excellent skills in writing and social media platforms as well as be capable of and enjoy rapid response to national and international climate related events.
It would be beneficial to have a background in women’s rights and empowerment and have a foundation in climate justice. You’ll have the honor of amplifying the collective work of amazing women leaders as they take on the greatest challenges of our time.
Creativity, humor, attention to detail, excellent communications skills, and computer access are a must.
If interested, please send cover letter and resume to Wyolah Garden, WECAN Program Coordinator wgarden@ix.netcom.com

 

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CSW 59 – BEIJING + 20 – UN COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN 2015
The fifty-ninth session of the Commission on the Status of Women will take place at United Nations Headquarters in New York, tentatively scheduled for 9-20 March 2015. Representatives of Member States, UN entities, and ECOSOC-accredited non-governmental organizations (NGOs) from all regions of the world attend the session.

The Commission will undertake a review of progress made in the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, 20 years after its adoption at the Fourth World Conference on Women in 1995. The review (Beijing+20) will also include the outcomes of the 23rd special session of the General Assembly, the first five-year assessment conducted after the adoption of the Platform for Action, which highlighted further actions and initiatives.

The session will also address current challenges that affect the implementation of the Platform for Action, as well as opportunities for achieving gender equality and the empowerment of women in the post-2015 development agenda.

The review will be conducted at national, regional and global levels. States are urged to undertake comprehensive national-level reviews of the progress made and challenges encountered in the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcomes of the 23rd special session of the General Assembly. (See guidance note for the preparation of national reviews).

The regional commissions of the United Nations will undertake regional reviews. Both the national and regional review processes will feed into the global review.

 

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 e-discussi​on: Make financial markets work for women

Dear Colleagues,
Below is a great opportunity to engage in an e-discussion on a very timely topic.  Consider how you can participate and register to lend your perspective and expertise on how to make financial markets work for women.  The more voices and ears, the better!
WHEN: 14 May to 6 June 2014
WHEREwww.EmpowerWomen.org (Knowledge Gateway for Women’s Economic Empowerment)
WHAT: Four focus areas: (1) Women’s access to financial services and products; (2) Women’s financial literacy and skills; (3) Women’s employment in the finance sector; (4) Measuring the gender impact.
HOWRegister to the Knowledge Gateway to participate. Once registered, you will receive an email with a verification link. Please click on this link to authenticate your email address.The e-discussion will be hosted here.
ORGANIZERS: UN Women and Oxford University’s Power Shift Forum.
Best regards,
Cara Beasley Communications and Network Officer, Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA) Email:  cara@gender-climate.org Web: www.gender-climate.org Skype: cara.beasley Twitter: @GGCA_gender
From: Knowledge Gateway for Women’s Economic Empowerment [mailto:knowledge.gateway@unwomen.org
Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 9:13 PM To: info@gender-climate.org
Subject: Join our e-discussion on “Make financial markets work for women”
Having trouble viewing this email? Click here

 

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Third WMO Gender Conference 5-7 November 2014  Geneva, Switzerlan​d

Dear GGCA Colleagues,

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is organizing the 3rd Gender Conference for 5-7 November in Geneva, Switzerland.  Several GGCA members are headlining the event: FAO, IUCN, UNISDR, UN Women, and WHO.  Registration is open and further information (used largely from PreventionWeb.net) is below.

Best regards,

Cara

 

Objectives – To provide a forum for hearing the voice of women and men as users and providers of weather and climate information; – To specify the challenges that women and men face due to climate variability and change; – To propose concrete actions in the provision of weather and climate services that can address the specific needs of women and men; – To formulate new mechanisms and showcase good practices to enhance the ability of women and men to access and use weather and climate services and information.

Expected Outcomes – Better understanding of gender aspects in the provision, access and use of weather and climate services for resilience; – Firm commitments in the provision and use of gender-oriented weather and climate services in the context of the four GFCS priority areas; – Leveraged investment for addressing the gender dimension of weather and climate services; – Conference Statement/Recommendations to WMO and UN organizations

Additional information

Gender at World Meteorlogical Organization

About the 3rd Conference on The Gender Dimension of Weather and Climate Services 

Conference Programme Guide

Conference Promotional Material

How to register

Contact: Ms Assia Alexieva  World Meteorological Organization  7 bis, Avenue de la Paix  P.O. Box 2300  1211 Geneva 2, Switzerland  Tel. +41 22 730 8390  Email: aalexieva(at)wmo.int  http://www.wmo.int/gender

The Gender and Climate Forum of the World Climate Conference-3 (WCC-3) concluded that the effects of weather and climate are not gender-neutral. Women and men are frequently affected differently by weather and climate impacts, and therefore could benefit from more contextualized weather and climate services for resilience building. They should also enjoy equal access to available weather and climate information. The Forum recommended that the Global Framework for ClimateServices (GFCS) reflect a gender perspective in all its components and that the collection of gender disaggregated data be enhanced.

At a time when WMO and its partners in the GFCS are forging ways to provide such user-driven, custom-tailored weather and climate information, it is essential to hear the voice of men and women, both as users and providers of climate services, with regard to their needs, gender-specific issues, and possible approaches of addressing them.
As part of the implementation of the WMO Policy on Gender Mainstreaming, this Conference will advance analysis of the gender dimension of weather and climate services. It will also amplify the decision taken at UNFCCC COP 18 to advance gender equality and improve the active participation of women in climate action. It will further be in line with the consideration of gender equality, women’s rights and women’s empowerment in the context of the post-2015 sustainable development agenda as well as contribute to the preparations for the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (Beijing+20) in 2015.
Given the four GFCS initial priority areas, we want to generate discussion on the gender nuances of climate variability and climate change adaptation a s well as explore the ground for development of weather and climate services, taking equally into account the needs of women and men in the areas of health, food, water, and disaster risk reduction. A s the examples below illustrate, there are specific ways in which women and men are affected by climate change in these sectors:

Food Security Women provide up to 80 per cent of agricultural labour and produce 45 to 90 per cent of domestically consumed food, depending on the region. In the context of climate change, traditional food sources become more vulnerable, and women face potential loss of income as well as harvests. Related increases in food prices make food more inaccessible to poor people, in particular to  women and children whose health has been found to decline more than male health in times of food shortages. Overall, women’s scarcer economic resources, lower adult literacy, and smaller involvement in decision-making lessen their capacity to respond in situations of environmental risk to food security.  At the same time, they play an important role in terms of family subsistence and managing the risk to global food supply in the face of an unprecedented world population growth.

Disaster risk reduction Every year 100 million women and girls are affected by disasters. Female-headed households are often among the poorest and  most vulnerable to disaster and climate change, as they may have little choice other than to live in precarious locations such as flood-prone lands or on steep slopes. Studies have shown that disaster mortality rates are higher for women than for men, and that this is caused by differences in vulnerability as a result of socially constructed gender roles, and inequalities between them in access to resources and decision-making power. Meanwhile, as mothers, community leaders, teachers, activists, social workers and role models, women are invaluable in disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation processes.

Water Management Gathering and transporting water in a number of developing countries, least developed and Small Island Developing States  typically falls on women and girls, who spend up to six hours every day fetching water. A task that is taking increasingly longer as a result of climate change, especially in drought prone areas. This results in less time available for education or other socio- economic activities for women and girls decreases. The longer travelling distance further heightens the risk of being exposed to violence. Women also play an important role as educators at the family and community level on the efficient use of water  resources.

Health There are gender related differences in many of the health risks that are likely to be influenced by on-going climate variability and change. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), natural disasters such as droughts, floods and storms kill more  women than men. Some diseases that women and children are especially vulnerable to, such as malaria and diarrhoea, are also expected to increase in prevalence as temperatures rise or as a result of floods and water contamination.
Air pollution and climate change are also tightly linked, with close to two million premature deaths caused annually, mostly of women and children in developing countries, due to the inefficient use of organic materials for cooking. There are also differences in other climate-sensitive health impacts, such as malnutrition.

Cara Beasley Communications and Network Officer, Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA) Email:  cara@gender-climate.org Web: www.gender-climate.org Skype: cara.beasley Twitter: @GGCA_gender

 

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Report of Joint Meeting of the Adaptation Committee and the Nairobi Work Programme on ITK & Gender-Sen​sitive Tools and Approaches 1 – 4 April 2014

 

Dear Colleagues,
Please be informed that the report on the meeting on available tools for the use of indigenous and traditional knowledge and practices for adaptation, needs of local and indigenous communities and the application of gender-sensitive approaches and tools for adaptation has been made available online on the UNFCCC website. Kindly find below the respective link:
http://unfccc.int/documentation/documents/advanced_search/items/6911.php?pri ref=600007852#beg
With kind regards from Bonn,
Juliette
Impacts, Vulnerability and Risks
(Embedded image moved to file: pic24179.gif)
United Nations Climate Change Secretariat Platz der Vereinten Nationen 1 53113 Bonn, Germany Phone +49 228 815 1174 Fax +49 228 815 1999 jcorssen@unfccc.int http://unfccc.int

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Regional Spotlight: Africa | Nairobi Policy Dialogue & Learning Exchange | African Union | Regional Organizing | Securing Women’s Tenure on Customary Land | Linking Land & Resilient Developmen​t

Having trouble viewing this email? http://www.huairou.org

The articles in this Regional Spotlight: Africa special edition of the HC Update newsletter originally appeared in the Spring 2014 Women’s Land Link Africa (WLLA) newsletter, which you can download 
  
Women’s Land Link Africa (WLLA) is a platform for grassroots women to build their collective knowledge and to persuasively advocate for their development goals around land and housing. WLLA plays a unique role as a center for innovation and knowledge dissemination through peer-to-peer exchanges across communities and countries on the continent and globally. There are currently 23 WLLA members operating in 13 countries in Africa. WLLA is distinguished by its
focus on grassroots women’s own priorities, interventions and agendas.
Throughout the coming year at the Huairou Commission, we will be reorganizing the WLLA governance structure and developing working groups around thematic areas, such as urban and peri urban land and customary land administration, amongst others.  

If you are interested in joining the leadership team working on this process, please contact Regina Pritchett at the Huairou Commission Secretariat: 

regina.pritchett@huairou.org

 

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Join live-streatmed launch of Gender and Social Inclusion Toolbox on 15 October

 

Dear Colleagues,

You are invited to join the live-streamed launch of Gender and Social Inclusion Toolbox on International Day of Rural Women (15 October)!  More information posted here and below. 

Download official event invitation and share with friends, colleagues and networks.

Regards,

Cara

The CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) Gender and Equity theme is, together with the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), organising a special event on Wednesday 15 October, looking at the development and use of gender-sensitive approaches in the context of climate change and agriculture research.

The event will launch a Gender & Inclusion Toolbox: Participatory Research in Climate Change & Agriculture. The toolbox is a participatory methodology guide on how to create socially differentiated research for climate adaptation and mitigation projects.

The event will feature speakers from ICRAF, CCAFS, CARE International, and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), all involved in the development of the Gender Toolbox.

How to join online?

The event will be live-streamed to a global audience between 10:00-12:00 am East Africa Time [8:00-09:00 UK Time]. There will be opportunities to ask questions to the presenters via online chat using #gendertoolbox during the seminar.

To get a reminder about the live-stream and to express your interest in joining, email Risper Nyairo: r.nyairo[at]cgiar.org.

 The web stream will be available on ICRAF’s live-stream page.

 Interested in joining in person?

The launch will take place at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), in Nairobi, Kenya, in the Conference Hall. After the presentations, onsite participants will be able to join a Gender Networking Lunch. The afternoon will include fun games, activities and challenges, all reflecting on the value of gender and social differentiation in agriculture and climate change programming.

Program outline [in East Africa Time]

- 10:00-12:00 Livestreamed launch of Gender Toolbox 

- 12:00-13:30 Gender Networking Lunch for onsite participants

- 13:30-15:30 Gender and Social inclusion discussions and games.

Learn more about the Gender Toolbox: Coming soon: a gender and climate change manual made by many

Reserve your seat by 8 October by sending an email to Risper Nyairo:r.nyairo[at]cgiar.org. Please indicate name, number of attendees, organization and contact information.

More information about the presentations, featured speakers and outline of the meeting will soon be posted here!

 There is a need to move beyond an ‘add women and stir’ approach to climate change and development is imperative if we are to create relevant and useful gender-sensitive knowledge for a climate-resilient future. Therefore, join the gender-discussions on 15 October!

The event is carried out in collaboration with CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) Gender and Equity Theme, CARE International, and World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF).

The Toolbox has been put to the test. Learn more from this blog.

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Indonesia Climate Change Education Forum & Expo  1 – 4 May 2014

Dear Friends and Colleagues,
Please share this announcement with your colleagues and networks.  Addressing Article 6 of the Convention, Indonesia is hosting the Indonesia Climate Change Education Forum and Expo (ICCEFE)  Thursday May 1st through Sunday May 4th, at the Jakarta Convention Center.  Last year they received 50,000 visitors, this year the theme focuses on The Role of Women and Youth in Climate Change Solutions.  To view the program, visit http://www.dnpi.go.id
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change with Tiahoga Rugue, Jim Taylor, Tish Pesanayi, Kavita Myles, and Suzana Padua
Youth Co-Coordinators Katherine Browne and Mohammad Arman Golrokhien
__________________
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell:  (734) 330-0238
Voice/Fax: (734) 994-3612
==========
Dear Colleagues,
The Indonesia Climate Change Education Forum and Expo (ICCEFE) will be held at the Jakarta Convention Center on Thursday, May 1, 2014 until Sunday, May 4, 2014.
Last year this annual event attracted 50,000 visitors, including school children, to exhibits presented by stakeholders showcasing their efforts in addressing climate change.
Hosted by the National Council on Climate Change Indonesia and open to the public, the theme for this year’s event is  “The Role of Women and Youth in Climate Change Solutions.”
In addition to the exhibits, dozens of unique programs are scheduled to raise awareness on climate change, ranging from art & music performances, interactive dialogues and games to workshops, film festival and cooking demos.
Please visit www.dnpi.go.id to view the detailed programs.
Kind regards
Amanda Katili Niode
National Focal Point for Article 6 of UNFCCC
Indonesia

 

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Dear Colleagues,
Emma Bowa who manages the Adaptation Learning Programme for Africa (ALP) for CARE Kenya was recently interviewed by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network CDKN.
In the below interview she talks about gender & climate policy in Kenya, the role of gender in people’s vulnerabilities to climatic impacts, and what has been and can be done to strengthen the role of women in making decisions and driving action on climate change in Northern Kenya.
Happy reading,
Agens

OPINION: How Kenya can turn its gender and climate change commitments into reality

Kenya has strongly promoted gender equity and  women’s participation in climate change mitigation and adaptation programmes. Emma Bowa of CARE Kenya talked to CDKN’s Giovanna Grandoni about whether these aspirations are borne out in reality..
Kenya is among the first African countries to develop legislation and policies that promote the participation of women in climate change activities. How are women involved in mitigation and adaptation programmes?
Women are increasingly getting involved in climate change programmes, both at the policy level and at the implementation (community) level. The Kenyan constitution offers a fairly good framework for equity and the Gender Commission is a mechanism set up to ensure that issues of equity are addressed in the country. There is a draft climate change policy and Bill in the country; both mention gender and women’s rights issues, although not in detail. The Kenya National Climate Change Action Plan also makes a mention of gender and women’s issues.
However, the challenge lies in the implementation of plans and policies developed; as well as in targeting the most vulnerable groups of people. More effort needs to be placed on ensuring that the necessary resources, financial and technical, are available for effective implementation.
It is widely acknowledged that women are among the most vulnerable to climate change in developing countries; for example, in the IPCC’s report Climate 2014: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability.  Based on your experience, what does the Kenyan experience show us?
It is true that there are disproportionately negative impacts of climate change on women. There are numerous examples of this, such as walking long distances to look for water, being left behind with children and small livestock to look after, when men move away in search of pasture and water in pastoralist communities, for example. Women  have also borne the brunt of natural resource-based conflicts; thesehave increased in recent times as a result of climate change related hazards, mainly longer, more severe and less predictable droughts.
However, women are not a homogeneous group, nor are they only passive or just victims in the context of climate change. They are actively engaging and influencing climate change and development planning and decision making processes. In Garissa, for example, they are increasingly diversifying their asset and capital base through small-scale businesses and village savings and loans groups. They are contributing to the planning and decision-making processes, by   highlighting their roles in post- harvest marketing and value addition.
Which CARE  projects are focusing on gender and climate change?
One is the Adaptation Learning Programme, which promotes community based adaptation approaches and models. One of the main successes has been in integrating the use of climate information for participatory adaptation planning and decision making at the community level, as well as the County and national levels.
A second one , the STARCK+ project, looks at developing a County Adaptation Fund  to support public good investments. The public good investments will be informed by participatory vulnerability and capacity assessments and by climate information through community-based adaptation planning processes. These will be led by ward adaptation planning committees ) supported by county adaptation planning committees.)
A gender analysis was carried out as part of the baseline to look at the differences and complementarities between men and women. The study went further, to interrogate ‘men and women’ as heterogeneous groups and considered issues of age, geographic location, livelihoods and access to resources. Women and men’s livelihoods activities were identified, and recommendations for strengthening linkages and interactions made. For example, men are engaged in the farm work and production of crops and animals, while women are more involved in the sale of the farm produce. Initially, when providing climate information, the focus was on  agricultural production, in terms of what to plant, when and what inputs to use. Including women in the discussions and planning processes ensured that climate information was also being produced to inform their investment and savings choices. In this way, some households reported having undertaken climate risk analysis for both production and the post-production periods and this helped to reduce and spread the climate risks.
What were the results of this gender analysis? How are men and women’s roles different and how does that relate to the common need to cope with climate change?
This varies from context to context. In some of the contexts, gender roles have also been changing with the changing climate. Generally, where systems and structures exist to allow for adaptation planning, men usually take a lead, with limited representation from women and the youth. However, there are efforts to promote increased representation from diverse groups within a community. During extreme events such as droughts and floods, women are left with children
For example in some traditionally nomadic pastoralist communities, there is less movement of the communities given the more frequent and longer droughts. Livestock has died in thousands and so the communities are settling into more sedentary lifestyles. Women have now started taking up income generating activities so as to contribute to income in the household. Men have also begun to work more closely with women. They have previously been separated in their roles, but having more interaction and understanding each other’s contribution has helped them to work better together.
How was it different in the communities you have worked with?
In Garissa, women do not take part in any farm activities. The men prepare the land and plant the seeds. They also grow pasture and take care of animals. Women have more access to the animals and can milk them, but cannot make decisions on selling them or slaughtering them for food or other reasons. As they are now living a more sedentary lifestyle, the women have had access to information and resources and are involved in selling the produce from the farm including milk products. The men are now interacting more with the women in planning for the season and the two groups complement each other. Women are charged with feeding children and the savings and loans help them to have extra resources for food, medicines and other necessities during extreme events, for example.
According to your experience, what are key measures to get more women involved in decision-making? What are the main consequences when it happens at community level?
The main measures should include:  raising awareness, increased capacity building,  research for more evidence based advocacy, and an enabling policy environment to ensure gender equality is mainstreamed and that institutions are well resourced.
When women are involved in decision-making they are able to share their perspectives. They also highlight the fact that not all women are the same. For example, there are differences according to the age and livelihoods groups they come from. Moreover, we have seen the differences in our project: since involving women in the capacity-building and climate information work in Garissa, they have had opportunities to speak publicly. The community has generally acknowledged that women also have skills that can be tapped into, including business skills, money management skills and leadership skills. It has been acknowledged that women can be active agents of change and can complement and/or build on to the work that the men are doing.
What are the  challenges around gender in Kenya today? What solutions do you suggest at national and community levels?
There’s still inequitable access and control over resources, at financial and technical levels and concerning access to information.
Planning and decision-making does not always take into account gender issues and the specific effects of climate change on different groups. Even where there are attempts to consider the differences between men and women, these groups are treated as homogeneous; generally with women as passive victims and men as active perpetrators, who prevent women from accessing and enjoying their rights.
Most of the policymakers and decision-makers understand gender concepts, but have limited information or capacity to transfer this information into action. They aren’t sure what integrating gender looks like in practice. On the other hand, there is often a lack of resources (financial, human, technical, time, research) allocated to ensure gender mainstreaming in climate change programming.
These can be addressed by complementing the actions already mentioned (raising awareness, increased capacity building, research and studies to support evidence based advocacy) with activities aimed at enabling legal and policy framework, and increasing the allocation of resources.
Image: Woman leader in Garissa, courtesy CARE Kenya.
by: CDKN Global | on: 10am, April 14, 2014
Agnes Otzelberger  |  CARE  |  Climate Change Adaptation and Gender Coordinator |  Poverty, Environment and Climate Change Network (PECCN) 
Brighton, UK  |  www.careclimatechange.org
T: +43 (0)660 5870506  |  Twitter: @AgnesCARE
skype: agnes_otz

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 WorldYout​h] Press Release: Internatio​nal Mother Earth Day

WORLD ASSEMBLY OF YOUTH

PRESS RELEASES

INTERNATIONAL MOTHER EARTH DAY: ‘GREEN CITIES’

DATE: 22ND APRIL 2014

 ‘We do not inherit the Earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children’~ Native American Proverb

For many years, she, our mother earth, has inhabited humans, animals and plants providing a haven to accommodate all living things without asking for much in return, merely a pledge to live in harmony. Regarding the vast benefits that have been rendered to us, it is sad to know that society has repaid with little or almost nothing; instead, society continues to act as an agent of destruction posing many challenges and annihilations suffered by her.

To acknowledge the significance of Mother Earth, 22nd of April has been specially observed as the International Mother Earth Day, held worldwide to demonstrate support for environmental protection. It was first celebrated in 1970, and is now coordinated globally. It recognizes that the Earth and its ecosystems provide its inhabitants with life and sustenance. It also aims to raise awareness that humans have a collective responsibility to promote harmony with nature and to balance the economic, social and environmental needs of present as well as those of future generations.

This year’s theme, ‘Green Cities’, focuses on making communities all over the world, green,  healthy and sustainable. In fact, recent days are the high time when societies are mostly determined to invest in efficient and renewable energy, rebuild cities and towns, and solve the climate crisis. Over the next couple of years, with a focus on Earth Day 2014, the Green Cities campaign will mobilize a global movement to hasten the transition of blending a modern urban-lifestyle with a touch of nature. Its aim is to help cities accelerate their transition to a cleaner, healthier, and more economically viable future through improvement in efficiency, investment in renewable technology and regulation reform. In addition, all stakeholders will work on the ground by strategically placing cities and towns to organise grassroots efforts to improve local codes, ordinances, and policies that will help in realization of green cities.

We, at World Assembly of Youth (WAY), are observing the selected theme “Green Cities” to highlight the awareness of measures taken to protect our mother earth. We strongly believe the time has come to halt all actions which degrade our mother earth; instead, we should seek proper ways of tailoring nature and green environment to the metropolitan life. We, especially young people, are all accountable and shall take up the responsibility by increasing efforts, raising awareness; taking initiative, and righting the wrongs of our ancestors. It’s time for youth to invest in efficiency and renewable energy, rebuild cities and towns, and begin to solve the climate crisis. Small efforts and contributions of youth such as usage of environmental friendly products and involvement as volunteers to conduct activities pertaining to green environment are highly encouraged.

Today possesses a scared opportunity for all people to unite, to seek harmony and peace to nature, for our children, families, societies, and for all inhabitants of Mother Earth. Thus, let us join hands in love, compassion and understanding to call for a new era of green cities revolution.

HAPPY INTERNATIONAL MOTHER EARTH DAY!

-END-

WAY Secretariat

 

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Women's Empowerment Principles

Live Webcast

 11 March at 1:15-2:30pm EST

Women’s Empowerment Principles Official Side Event of CSW58

Co-sponsored by the Government of Australia, UN Global Compact, UN Women, International Federation of Business and Professional Women and the NGO CSW Forum 2014, the Women’s Empowerment Principles: Equality Means Business
Re-Visioning the Development Agenda – A Multi-Stakeholder Dialogue

will be live-streamed internationally. Friends and colleagues that are unable to join us in person, please join via live webcast at http://webtv.un.org.
See programme here.

Join the Conversation!
Follow us on Facebook and Twitter, and use the hashtags #EqualityMeansJobs and#CSW58

You are receiving this communication based on your interest in the Women’s Empowerment Principles. To unsubscribe from this list, please click here

 

 

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http://community.globalfundforwomen.org/o/6174/t/0/blastContent.jsp?email_blast_KEY=1286291

 

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Dear GGCA Members,

 

I am pleased to share an update on gender related news from CSW58 (below) from http://uncsd.iisd.org/news/csw-58-recommends-stand-alone-gender-goal/

 

A big “Thank you” to our colleagues who work tirelessly to advocate and ensure that gender will be reflected in the Post 2015 Development Agenda!  Those on the ground and directly involved remotely in the CSW58 conference had a hand in the agreed set of conclusions that includes recommendations for both a stand-alone gender goal and having gender integrated into all goals through targets and indicators.  To my knowledge, CARE, International Alliance of Women, MRFCJ, the Secretariat of the Pacific Community, UN SD Education Caucus, UN Women, and WEDO were present and active at CSW58.

 

Good work!  But we know there is more to be done.  Let’s celebrate this success and use its momentum to capitalize on opportunities this year to continue to influence a new climate deal that considers gender at its heart.

 

Best regards,

Cara

Cara Beasley
Communications and Network Officer, Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA)

Email:  cara@gender-climate.org
Web: www.gender-climate.org
Skype: cara.beasley
Twitter: @GGCA_gender

 

 


 

CSW 58 Recommends Stand-alone Gender Goal

22 March 2014: The 58th Session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW 58) agreed on a set of conclusions on its priority theme, ‘Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for women and girls.’ The Commission called for gender equality, women’s rights and women’s empowerment to be reflected in the post-2015 development agenda both as a stand-alone goal and to be integrated into all goals through targets and indicators.

 

To accelerate MDG achievement and prioritize gender equality, women’s rights and women’s empowerment in the post-2015 agenda, the session’s outcome recommends global, regional and national level actions on: realizing women’s and girls’ full enjoyment of all human rights; strengthening the enabling environment for gender equality; maximizing investments in gender equality and women’s rights; strengthening the evidence-base for gender quality; and ensuring women’s participation at all levels and strengthening accountability.

 

The outcome of CSW 58 “represents a milestone towards a transformative global development agenda that puts the empowerment of women and girls at its center,” said UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka. She commended the Commission for providing “valuable guidance” on shortcomings in designing and implementing the MDGs and identifying issues not sufficiently addressed by the MDGs. Such issues include: women’s equal access to assets and productive resources; women’s disproportionate share of unpaid care work; the gender wage gap; violence against women; women’s sexual and reproductive health; and women’s participation in decision-making.

 

In its outcome, CSW 58: welcomed progress made for women and girls on several MDGs while expressing deep concern that overall progress remains “slow and uneven” across all MDGs; expressed special concern about the lack of progress for the most marginalized groups of women and girls and those living in conflict-affected countries; expressed concern that several MDG indicators, including those on environmental sustainability, hunger, poverty and the global partnership for sustainable development, do not provide information about women and girls; recognized that a lack of investment in gender statistics has limited gender-responsive MDG monitoring; recognized several areas that have hindered MDG achievement for women and girls, such as climate change, food insecurity, global financial and economic crises, volatile food and energy prices, unequal power relations between women and men, and discriminatory laws, social norms and stereotypes; and recognized the lack of systematic gender mainstreaming and under-investment in gender equality and women’s empowerment as barriers to progress.

 

CSW 58 convened from 10-21 March 2014, at UN Headquarters in New York, US. More than 6,000 representatives attended the meeting, which included over 135 events by UN agencies and over 300 parallel events hosted by civil society. [UN Women Statement] [UN Press Release] [CSW 58 Website] [Draft Agreed Conclusions]

 


read more: http://uncsd.iisd.org/news/csw-58-recommends-stand-alone-gender-goal/

 

 

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Invitation​:  “Caring for Women is Caring for the World:  The challenges pre- and post- 2015

 

 CSW58 Flyer             CSW58 BIOGRAPHICAL DATA

 

 

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UN CSW58  March 10 – 21, 2014 – Side Event Announceme​nt “U.N. Women’s Circles Connecting​” Fri. March 7th

Dear Community of Educators,
The U.N. fifty-eighth session of the Commission on the Status of Women [CSW], March 10-21, 2014 will take place at UN Headquarters in New York.  Several UN SD  Education Caucus members will actively be taking part in the meetings.  If you are planning on joining the CSW58 meetings in NY, let us know, share your reports, briefings, advocacy work, and announcements, as we follow the good work.
Here is a link to provide an overview of the CSW, https://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/csw/
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change
__________________ Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell:  (734) 330-0238
Voice/Fax: (734) 994-3612

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“WAY”

WORLD ASSEMBLY OF YOUTH

PRESS RELEASE

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY: ‘EQUALITY FOR WOMEN IS PROGRESS FOR ALL’

DATE: 8 MARCH 2014

 

“The story of women’s struggle for equality belongs to no single feminist nor to any one organization but to the collective efforts of all who care about human rights “Gloria Steiner

 

What could possibly be more hurtful than witnessing a woman full to the brim with potential, only to be hindered and constrained by gender-discrimination. Over the past decade, the issue of gender equality has attained widespread awareness, and has been addressed with increasing urgency in support of the rights of women.

The discussion of women’s rights has been at the forefront of human rights endeavours, since the boom of industry in Europe and the USA in the late 1880s, particularly when women begun working in industry alongside men, combatting disparities in treatment, wages and entitlements.

Celebrated annually on the 8th of March, International Women’s Day thrives for the recognition of the achievements of women without regard to segregation in linguistic, ethnicity, cultural, political or economic. It is a day set aside for us to look back on the past struggles of women, their accomplishments and the journey ahead towards attaining comprehensive gender equality.

The new millennium has seen a significant transformation and attitudinal shift in society’s view on women emancipation, resulting in greater equality in legislative rights and an increased viability as impressive role models in all aspect of life, taking on roles and occupations initially dominated by the male gender.

 

Today, however apparent progress in gender equality may seem, many efforts still need to be engaged towards a society where gender equality is absolute. Towards such efforts, we, at the World Assembly of Youth (WAY) continue to partake in the global initiatives for enlivening the principle of gender equality. In line with this year theme ‘Equality for Women is Progress for all’, we urge young women to step up and work to realize their true potential as part of a gender neutral society, and strive even harder to alleviate the hardships still being faced by fellow women, around the world.

As a global community, we cannot truly achieve progress and growth, until we address the concerns of those closest to us, let us work hand in hand towards levelling the playing field, let us work towards attaining gender equality. Change will always be what you make of it, and it starts with you.

HAPPY INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY!

-END-

WAY SECRETARIAT

 

 

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Third WMO gender conference 05-07 Nov 2014

 

Dear Climate Colleagues,

 

Below is an opportunity to attend the Third WMO gender conference 05-07 Nov 2014organized by World Meteorological Organization (WMO) focusing on gendered aspects of climate change.  The announcement comes from http://www.preventionweb.net/english/professional/trainings-events/events/v.php?id=36560&a=email&utm_source=pw_email.

 

Let us know if you plan to attend.  The WMO has been very supportive of Environmental Education and Educating  for Sustainability.

 

 

All the best,

Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh

UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs

Co-Coordinators Climate Change

 

 

__________________
Dr. P. J. Puntenney

Environmental & Human Systems Management

1989 West Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA

 

E-mail:  pjpunt@umich.edu

Cell:  (734) 330-0238

Voice/Fax: (734) 994-3612

 

 

======================

 

 

Type: Meeting or Conference

·         Date: 05-07 Nov 2014

·         Location: Switzerland (Geneva)

Main organizer

·         World Meteorological Organization (WMO)

Description

The Gender and Climate Forum of the World Climate Conference-3 (WCC-3) concluded that the effects of weather and climate are not gender-neutral. Women and men are frequently affected differently by weather and climate impacts, and therefore could benefit from more contextualized we ather and climate services for resilience building. They shou ld also enjoy equal access to available weather and climate information. The Forum recommended that the Global Framework for ClimateServices (GFCS) reflect a gender perspective in all its components and that the collection of gender disaggregated data be enhanced.

At a time when WMO and its partners in the GFCS are forging ways to provide such user-driven, custom-tailored weather and
climate information, it is essential to hear the voice of men and women, both as users and providers of climate services, with
regard to their needs, gender-specific issues, and possible approaches of addressing them.

As part of the implementation of the WMO Policy on Gender Mainstreaming, this Conference will advance analysis of the gender dimension of weather and climate services. It will also amplify the decision taken at UNFCCC COP 18 to advance gender equality and improve the active participation of women in climate action. It will further be in line with the consideration of gender equality, women’s rights and women’s empowerment in the context of the post-2015 sustainable development agenda as well as contribute to the preparations for the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (Beijing+20) in 2015.

Given the four GFCS initial priority areas, we want to generate discussion on the gender nuances of climate variability and climate change adaptation a s well as explore the ground for development of weather and climate services, taking equally into a
ccount the needs of women and men in the areas of health, food, water, and disaster risk reduction. A s the examples below illustrate, there are specific ways in which women and men are affected by climate change in these sectors:

Food Security

Women provide up to 80 per cent of agricultural labour and produce 45 to 90 per cent of domestically consumed food, depending on the region. In the context of climate change, traditional food sources become more vulnerable, and women face potential loss of income as well as harvests. Related increases in food prices make food more inaccessible to poor people, in particular to  women and children whose health has been found to decline more than male health in times of food shortages. Overall, women’s scarcer economic resources, lower adult literacy, and smaller involvement in decision-making lessen their capacity to respond in
situations of environmental risk to food security.

At the same time, they play an important role in terms of family subsistence and managing the risk to global food supply in the face of an unprecedented world population growth.

Disaster risk reduction

Every year 100 million women and girls are affected by disasters. Female-headed households are often among the poorest and  most vulnerable to disaster and climate change, as they may have little choice other than to live in precarious locations such as
flood-prone lands or on steep slopes. Studies have shown that disaster mortality rates are higher for women than for men, and that this is caused by differences in vulnerability as a result of socially constructed gender roles, and inequalities between them in access to resources and decision-making power. Meanwhile, as mothers, community leaders, teachers, activists, social workers and role models, women are invaluable in disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation processes.

Water Management
.
Gathering and transporting water in a number of developing countries, least developed and Small Island Developing States  typically falls on women and girls, who spend up to six hours every day fetching water. A task that is taking increasingly longer as a result of climate change, especially in drought prone areas. This results in less time available for education or other socio- economic activities for women and girls decreases. The longer travelling distance further heightens the risk of being exposed to violence. Women also play an important role as educators at the family and community level on the efficient use of water  resources.

Health

There are gender related differences in many of the health risks that are likely to be influenced by on-going climate variability and
change. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), natural disasters such as droughts, floods and storms kill more  women than men. Some diseases that women and children are especially vulnerable to, such as malaria and diarrhoea, are also expected to increase in prevalence as temperatures rise or as a result of floods and water contamination.

Air pollution and climate change are also tightly linked, with close to two million premature deaths caused annually, mostly of women and children in developing countries, due to the inefficient use of organic materials for cooking. There are also differences in other climate-sensitive health impacts, such as malnutrition.

Objectives

- To provide a forum for hearing the voice of women and men as users and providers of weather and climate information;
- To specify the challenges that women and men face due to climate variability and change;
- To propose concrete actions in the provision of weather and climate services that can address the specific needs of women and men;
- To formulate new mechanisms and showcase good practices to enhance the ability of women and men to access and use weather and climate services and information.

Expected Outcomes

- Better understanding of gender aspects in the provision, access and use of weather and climate services for resilience;
- Firm commitments in the provision and use of gender-oriented weather and climate services in the context of the four GFCS priority areas;
- Leveraged investment for addressing the gender dimension of weather and climate services;
- Conference Statement/Recommendations to WMO and UN organizations

Additional information

http://www.wmo.int/pages/themes/gender/documents/3…

Target audience

Providers and users of weather, climate and related environmental services

How to register

Contact: Ms Assia Alexieva
World Meteorological Organization
7 bis, Avenue de la Paix
P.O. Box 2300
1211 Geneva 2, Switzerland
Tel. +41 22 730 8390
Email: aalexieva(at)wmo.int
http://www.wmo.int/gender

Related Links

·         View concept note [ext. link]

Keywords

·         Themes:Climate Change, Disaster Risk Management, Food Security & Agriculture, Gender, Health & Health Facilities, Water

·         Countries/Regions:Switzerland

·
Short URL:http://preventionweb.net/go/36560

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 International Women’s Day

 http://mediaimpact.org/

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Educating for sustainability: Marta – Reflections for the 21st Century: On How t o Discern on the Importance of International Women’s Day

Reflections for the 21st Century: On How to Discern on the Importance of International Women’s Day

By Marta Benavides,

GCAP Global Co Chair, and the Feminist Task Force/FTF,

SIGLO XXIII Movement for Culture of Peace,

El Salvador.

The International day of Women was created in recognition and to celebrate the Rights of women workers, in order to promote their participation in the struggle for equity and equality, which presently is one of the UN Millennium Development Goals/MDGs.. and in the upcoming Sustainable Development Goals/SDGs, it is being considered as a possible stand alone goal, so, women can have an effective equal presence with men, for social and personal development. In the Sustainability and Social development Agenda, gender perspective and women rights are considered to be key to the eradication of poverty and hunger, and to the creation of the WORLD AND FUTURE THAT MUST BE CREATED FOR THE CARE OF PRESENT AND FUTURE GENERATIONS AND THE URGENT CARE OF THE PLANET.

It was first celebrated on 8th March1911, in Germany, Austria, Denmark and Switzerland The United Nations at its General Assembly in 1977, proclaimed 8th March as the International Day for Women´s Rights, and now this celebration and commemoration is in most countries a Nationally celebrated day.

Today, in spite of all the work about it, the concern on all types of violence and discrimination against women continues to be a major issue and concern, to the point that in many countries there are offices to monitor them as feminicides. El Salvador, Guatemala, Peru and Mexico are concrete examples of this situation, which happen in many more countries and still does not seem to be effectively addressed.

Violence against women is not just what is happening to individual women, we see that the educational, economic, social and cultural aspects of the current systems, at local, national and global levels must intentionally work with a transformational agenda to be able to achieve this urgently needed change, that not only robs women and societies of peace, but does not allow the qualitative development for the new paradigm to become a reality in our life time.

There are aspects, many historical, many legal, many cultural, and economic that affect directly the maintenance of this reality: the colonial and slave enterprise, the international division of labor, the forced impoverishment that maintains people to live in survival, which in turn needs to force women into the care and the so called informal economy and to be cheap labor. All these conditions are based in ignorance and a culture of discrimination and the exploitation of peoples and whole nations, this is what we consider to be the extractive model of development, which is based in the violations of all human rights, the economic,social and cultural rights of peoples, and the rights of the planet and the environment.

The structures of the state, must reflect the commitment to this understanding, that this is a matter of peace and of national security, thus there must be policies of state and administration of government that in fulfillment of the national constitution go about meeting in a timely manner, these demands for the well being of all, and the care of the planet. The national and international budgets must reflect this commitment. This is not about assistance, but about real transformation of all the endeavors of national and global society. If a country finds a way to meet the basic needs of women by taking loans that the whole society must pay, but the national constitution, and the various policies and services do not show the timely commitment for equity and equality, the chance to eradicate poverty and hunger will only be about the alleviation of these two major indicators of real development and sustainability It is then urgent and important not to fall in such a trap, which only comes to add to the financial and economic indebtedness of the society, and nations, to say the least, and to maintain the system of inequality and impoverishment as it basically exist..

If we are serious about this commitments and we keep our eyes wide open, and our eyes in the prize as the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., called us to be, we will be able to detect the countless very costly gimmicks that are being created and carried out today, under the guise for women equality and for the defense of their rights.

It is time to go from the promises to real action, it can be done, and the enjoyment of the fullness of life can be a reality sooner rather than later.Now is the time… let us move now.

A way to contribute to this societal change of paradigm about equity and equality for all, and in particular for women, it is most important to make sure we have clarity of the call, FOR THE WORLD AND FUTURE THAT ARE NEEDED FOR THE CARE OF PEOPLE AND PLANET, FOR THE ERADICATION NOT THE ALLEVIATION OF POVERTY AND HUNGER.

In El Salvador we have been conducting consultations on the MDGs and toward the SDGs, with the very people that have been excluded for centuries, since the colonizers went global around the world. These are some of the considerations that are key to real, timely and relevant results:

Women, youth/children, migrants, older adults, first nations, LGBTQ, people with special challenges, rural and coastal peoples, who have been and are traditionally excluded must be intentionally listened to, and brought into the circle of all.

Use the correct language when referring to people in conditions of poverty– not the poor, the marginalized, the less fortunate, the disadvantage.. etc. etc.. you know all the names used to refer to people forced into poverty

Do remember that there is lots of expertise in our communities, we know how to transform the situations we have to face, besides resisting them, we create possibilities. When we say we know how to end poverty and hunger, listen to us.. it is because of the illegal colonial practices, that we do not have our lands, water, seeds.. we know how to feed people, we have been doing this in spite of the land graving that is still going on. See our expertise. Do not continue to dismiss it, commit to not do it any more.

Know that INGOs and NGOs can only accompany us in the social transformations that must happen, but each of person can choose to walk with us. Do not look down on us, nor use our situation to live privileged life.

Be willing to see deeply on what has been going on.. we know of high level staff at the UN, who deny the impact of the historical colonial and slavery experiences.. these two are key to understand the conditions in which we are now, and to figure out the ways to move ahead. Cultural aspects are also very important factors of development

For our communities peace and development are one and the same.. and happiness is what we see as a good result of them… success and progress do not mean the same to us as those people that see them as privilege, position and money.

The UN is a peace organization, thus all its work must be for the enjoyment of a culture of peace.

We understand that there is a critical financial and economic crisis, a crisis of employment and an environmental – climate change crisis that are impacting very negatively all aspects of life and that is also at the roots of conflict and violence, and wars.

Especially we need to call attention to the following recommendation, which for our people is the most important and needed work that must carried out immediately:

We are affirming the recommendation consumption and production patterns by Social Watch:

Joint civil society action around Post-2015 has to focus on goals and commitments for the countries of the North, the necessary changes of the consumption and production patterns in these countries, and the structural framework conditions shaped by these countries, particularly in the global financial, investment and trade systems.

This call to do this urgent work is best understood and underlined by a message from Bolivians on the terrible floorings they are suffering today: Therefore the Bolivian tragedy cannot be blamed only in climate change but in the fatal combination of causes all related to the thirst for energy of the occidental way of life.

Here are suggested indicators to measure the effectiveness of this work, they were presented Feb 2014 to the UN by the Women Major Group and the Women Post 2015 Coalition working for the creation of the SDGs:

  • Secure Safe and Sustainable and Just Production and Consumption Patterns and eliminate hazardous substances and technologies.
  • Guarantee (100%) application of the precautionary principle and the polluter pays principle to policies and programs on sustainable production and consumption and to new and existing technologies, products and waste management processes.
  • Ensure full application of prior free and informed consent: Indigenous and local knowledge systems and technologies are adequately recognized, protected, strengthened and used ensuring control by the indigenous communities. Women and other affected groups participate effectively in decision-making throughout all stages of technology development, including assessment.
  • Eliminate (100%) hazardous substances: Phase out harmful substances and chemicals and radioactive substances linked with persistent and/or irreversible damage to humans and the environment.
  • Harmful chemicals: hazardous pesticides, endocrine disrupting chemicals, CMRs, PB…etc.
  • Harmful substances including so mercury, lead, arsenic, cadmium, asbestos in products and processes

Radioactive substances

  • Eliminate (100%) all unsustainable tax incentives: Tax exemptions, subsidies, regulatory frameworks and other incentives are redirected towards sustainable, knowledge and employment-intensive sectors and local sustainable value chains and away from unsustainable activities, including industrial fisheries, forestry and agriculture, risky and otherwise unsustainable forms of energy production like fossil fuels, nuclear energy, unconventional energy production/franking and industrial bioenergy, extractive industries and chemical industry
  • 100% Internalization of environmental costs for the full life-cycle of products; this includes full insurance costs for greatest expectable accidents in case of high-risk technologies. Currently, nuclear power operators and many other high-risk industrial complexes, are exempted from insurance obligations, which means that in case of accidents, the tax-payer/ citizens end up paying for the damage.
  • Full environmental and social corporate reporting and accountability. Set binding criteria that industrial production and consumption practices, especially extractive industries, do not cause violence, toxic pollution, displacement, poverty, resource scarcity, gender disparity, or environmental degradation.
  • Enact corporate social accountability standards are put in place to enforce decent labor conditions and prevent overuse and overproduction of resources and pollution by investors and corporations.
  • Ensure access to environmentally sound technologies, developing countries have equitable access to technologies, agreement on lifting of intellectual property barriers and measures to ensure that knowledge is in the public domain.
  • Full technology assessment and authorization: Ensure independent social and environmental impact assessments to monitor and evaluate new and existing industries by establishing a multilateral mechanism for ecological, social, cultural, and economic evaluation of technologies. Enact moratorium on all technologies that can damage Earth cycles, such as geo-engineering and deep sea mining.

 And here is also the Oxfam document on inequalities:

 http://www.oxfam.org/en/policy/working-for-the-few-economic-inequality

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Dear colleagues in the Global Gender & Climate Allaince
March 10 marked the start of the Commission on the Status of Women – the annual gathering in NYC where countries monitor progress against womens rights. This year states will discuss gender and the MDGs post 2015.
CARE is in NYC with a delegation of activists from across our network. As per the attached policy briefing ”Making womens rights and gender equality a reality post 2015”, we are lobbying for a standalone gender goal and for strong enabling policies that deliver on gender equality including in the area of climate change.
Please do share it with your respective governments and networks over the CSW period and beyond.
For any questions or to make contact with CARE staff at CSW, please contact my colleagues Kate Hunt khunt@care.org and Aisha Rahamatali rahamatali@careinternational.org
All the best
Agnes
Agnes Otzelberger  |  CARE  |  Climate Change Adaptation and Gender Coordinator |  Poverty, Environment and Climate Change Network (PECCN) 
Brighton, UK  |  www.careclimatechange.org
T: +43 (0)660 5870506  |  Twitter: @AgnesCARE
skype: agnes_otz

UN Women Care CIUK WRGE Brief v3

 

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Soka Gakkai Internatio​nal CSW58 Parallel Event

Dear Friends,

 

Please join us on Thursday for this round table discussion on Women’s Leadership.  It promises to take our conversation circle discussion and and allow us to explore the topic in more depth.
I hope to see you there.
Best, Mary Mack

CSW58 Parallel Event Flyer FINAL 2014

 

 

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Read More: On International Women's Day, UN Entities Emphasize Equality for All
http://uncsd.iisd.org/sd-update/2014-03-10/

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Celebratin​g Int. Women’s Day on CCAFS blog

Dear friends,

 

This week we have celebrated women across the globe and highlighted gender as an important aspect of agriculture and climate change research!
We, the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), have posted a few gender-related stories on our blog. We’ve posted a blog on a study that looks at how women are taking the lead in mitigation projects and how that can be replicated and scaled-up elsewhere; introduced our readers to an upcoming Gender and Climate Change Research Manual to be released later this year; and showed how gender went from being a latecomer in the climate debate to now shaping a new climate change and agriculture research agenda.

 

Previously, we’ve also shared a story with accompanying video showcasing how women in South Asia are being sensitized to climate impacts and are now teaching others about the gender-dimensions of climate adaptation, and published an analysis on gender within climate-smart agriculture.             

 

If you are using Twitter, you’ll find proposed tweets for our three latest IWD stories down below. If you have a great story to tell linked to Int. Women’s Day, please forward to me (c.schubert@cgiar.org) and I will make sure it is highlighted on our Storify board!
You can also view our Flickr-set: Celebrating Women Across the Globe & video-playlist on the Theme: Gender and Social Differentiation
 

Tweets:   - Gender: from latecomer to shaping a new research agenda for agriculture and climate change I @cgiarclimate http://ow.ly/ul751 #IWD  - Project pioneers: Understanding how women #farmers lead the way in mitigation activities bit.ly/1icfiJq via @cgiarclimate #IWD  – Want to learn more abt #gender in the context of #climatechange? Upcoming manual will lead the way ow.ly/ugtza #IWD @cgiarclimate

Kind regards,
Cecilia Schubert 
CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) 

 

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Dear Friends and Colleagues,

 
The Platform for Action adopted at the 1995 UN Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, China, is an agenda for women’s empowerment, offering a defining policy framework and roadmap for achieving gender equality and women’s rights. It has stimulated unprecedented political energy and social mobilization around the world, with gov- ernments, civil society and others using it to take steps to end inequality and discrimination. UN Member States have repeatedly reaffirmed its normative force.

But there is still far to go in realizing the full promise of the Beijing agenda. With 2015 marking the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the Platform for Action, now is the time to galvanize recommitment and mobilize all actors for acceler- ated and effective implementation. UN Women has a leading role in this process to achieve gender equality and realize women’s rights.

Beijing+20 takes place at an historic moment when major international efforts to advance human development and human rights converge. The global community is intensify- ing efforts to accomplish the eight Millennium Development Goals by their 2015 endpoint and considering a post-2015 development agenda and sustainable development goals as a global roadmap for the future.

UN Women will give strong visibility to Beijing+20 through a dynamic, forward-looking process that will galvanize diverse stakeholders: governments, parliamentarians, civil society, media, opinion leaders, the UN system and the private sector. It will engage women and men, boys and girls, and youth, with actions at global, regional and national levels. See the attachment for the core objectives and key actions.

Please share with your colleagues and networks.

 
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
Co-Coordinator Climate Change

__________________
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell:  (734) 330-0238
Voice/Fax: (734) 994-3612

 

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Dear Colleagues,
We are excited to share with you a new Guidance Note which aims to promote gender sensitive REDD+ processes as well
as support countries and stakeholders in the preparation, development and implementation of gender sensitive national
REDD+ strategies.  Prepared under the UN-REDD Progamme, the process of drafting this document has been led by
UNDP’s Environment and Energy Group and the UNDP Gender Team.
Through five components, the Guidance Note provides the rationale for investing the time and resources, offers concrete
examples of good practices and guidance, and pro­poses specific actions that can be taken in order to ensure that gender
sensitive REDD+ outcomes are realized. By taking such steps, REDD+ can be more efficient, effective and sustainable.
The Guidance Note can now be downloaded in English here, and the French and Spanish versions of this Note will be
available shortly.
Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions.
With kind regards,

 

Elizabeth Eggerts

UNDP Gender Team

Bureau for Development Policy

New York, NY 10017

elizabeth.eggerts@undp.org

http://www.undp.org

 

UN-UNEP Red Guidance Note Gender Sensitive REDD English FINAL PDF

 

 

http://www.peacewomen.org/publications_enews_issue.php?id=193

 

 

 

 

CBM Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals policy brief: Gender equality and women’s empowerment: women and girls with disabilities
10 Feb 2014 | Addressing Inequalities: Article by emlockwood@gmail.com

Gender inequality is acknowledged as the most pervasive form of inequality, and failure to achieve gender equality, impacts on the rights of women and girls everywhere, and slows growth and progress from a development perspective. This short policy briefing paper prepared for the Open Working Group meeting on ‘Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment’, sets out key five issues for women and girls ! with disabilities, each of which, highlight the intersectionality between gender and disability, and resonate with the current narrative for crosscutting goals on gender equality and the need for the post-2015 framework to be underpinned by human rights. The recommendations are both overarching (relating to gender equality and human rights) and are also specific to women and girls with disabilities.

Overarching recommendations on gender and disability and sustainable development goals

•   Ensure that goals and measures adopted by the post-2015 development framework to support gender equality recognize the intersectionality between gender and disability.

•   Ensure that goals adopted by the post-2015 development framework to support the protection of women and girls are inclusive of women and girls with disabilities.

Recommendations specific to women and girls with disabilities and sustainable development goals

•   Inclusive growth strategies must address the barriers women and girls with disabilities face in accessing education and employment opportunities.

•   Responses to gender based violence must address the unique aspects of violence against women and girls with disabilities, including their! access to vital support and recovery services.

•   Measures to improve women’s access to justice must address the barriers faced by women and girls with disabilities, and in particular include a range of measures to build capacity and knowledge of their rights.

•   Measures to support the rights of women in exercising control over their own bodies and family planning must be inclusive of women and girls with disabilities.

•   Action taken to improve women’s participation in political and public life must include women and girls with disabilities.

 

Overall Recommendation

1: Ensure that goals and measures adopted by the post-2015 development framework to support gender equality recognize the intersectionality between gender and disability.

The policy narrative on the post-2015 sustainable development agenda, has so far acknowledged the limitations of current development goals with respect to gender equality, and commitments have been given to ensure that the next global framework for development builds a society where all women and girls are able to realize their full potential. Women and girls with disabilities make up a significant percentage of the world’s female population; yet their issues, which are mostly similar to issues faced by all women and girls, have traditionally remained invisible from both disability and gender policies. In fact, some international human rights lawyers go so far as to suggest that women and girls with disabilit! ies have failed to be afforded, or benefit from provisions in international, regional and national laws, standards and agreements. Aside from the law, from a policy perspective women and girls with disabilities do not receive sufficient attention, and when they do, it’s usually within the context of vulnerable populations, or as ‘special concerns’ or at the end of a list of marginalized groups. This lack of prioritization of women and girls with disabilities has resulted in the current global development goals failing to address the barriers they face.

Gender and disability are inextricably linked, yet the intersection between the two remains disconnected

It is acknowledged that disability and gender in the developing world are inextricably linked. Studies show that gender can be considered a risk for acquiring a disability. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that more than 30 women every minute are seriously injured or disabled during la! bor, thus rendering vast numbers of women in the developing world physically and socially disabled. For every woman who dies from pregnancy-related complications, between 30 and 100 more live with painful and debilitating consequences. Equally, women with disabilities are excluded from the majority of development interventions due to the fact they are disabled and indeed, as a woman, they are also more vulnerable to poverty. For example the UN has stated, “the combination of male preference in many cultures and the universal devaluation of disability can be deadly for disabled females”. However, despite this interconnectedness disability and gender are generally viewed separately (in their own silos) from both a legal and policy perspective, and issues that crossover both are responded to uniquely rather than taking a common approach.

 

Overall Recommendation

2: Ensure that goals adopted by the post-2015 development framework to promote and protect the rights of women and girls are inclusive of women and girls with disabilities.


Empowerment for women and girls with disabilities through human rights protection

In order for the new sustainable development vision to be truly transformative for all women and girls, including those with disabilities, it must ensure that human rights and equality and non-discrimination are recognized as core values. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2006 and ratified by over 138 countries provides a normative framework, which promotes and protects the rights of women and girls with disabilities. So also do the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), and the Convention! on the Rights of the Child (CRC). The CRPD takes a twin track approach in protecting women and girls with disabilities, ensuring that Articles in the Convention take account of issues specific to gender equality (Article 5, 8, 16 and 24), while also providing specific protection for women with disabilities (Article 6) and children with disabilities (Article 7). The Committee monitoring the CRPD has formed a working group to provide a General Comment on women and girls with disabilities to ensure a thorough understanding of the issue.

Women and girls with disabilities – the key issues

This section outlines five key issues and makes a number of recommendations on how to include women and girls with disabilities in the post-2015 sustainable development framework.

1. Exclusion from participating in a sustainable inclusive economy

It is acknowledged that women and girls with disabilities face barriers in accessing traditional r! outes used to escape poverty, including education and employment. While precise data remains limited, it is generally accepted that women and girls with disabilities have less access to education, social services and employment opportunities than non-disabled women and disabled men. With respect to education, statistics from the World Report on Disability highlight that 50.6% of males with disability have completed primary school, compared with 61.3% of males without a disability. For females with disability the report notes that 41.7% completed primary school compared to 52.9% of females without a disability. Furthermore the UNDP reports the literacy rate for women with disabilities may be as low as 1% and UNICEF reports that women and children with disabilities receive 20% less rehabilitation services. However with appropriate access and support women and girls with disabilities are eager to take up education.

In ! terms of employment opportunities, the World Report on Disability (highlighting findings from the World Health Survey) states that results for 51 countries gives employment rates of 52.8% for men with disability and 19.6% for women with disability and 19.6% for women with disability, compared with 64.9% for non-disabled men, and 29.9% for non-disabled women. This lack of access to employment opportunities becomes more acute for women with disabilities in rural areas, where research has found that more than 80% of women with disabilities have no independent means of livelihood, and are totally dependent on others for their very existence. Yet, there is some positive news with progress being made in areas such as entrepreneurship for women with disabilities and decent work for women with disabilities.

Articles 24 (Education) and 27 (Work and Employment) of the CRPD protect the rights of women and girls with disabilities to access education, vocational and employment opportunities. Women and girls with disabilities are also protected by Article 10 (Education) and Article 11 (Employment) of CEDAW.

Specific recommendation

Inclusive growth strategies must address the barriers facing women and girls with disabilities in accessing education, employment and income opportunities.

2. Increased risk of violence and abuse

Women and girls with disability, by virtue of being a woman as well as having a disability, are at an increased risk of violence17. While women and girls with disabilities face similar experiences to non-disabled women with respect to gender- based violence, they also face unique issues as a result of their disability. For example women and girls with disabilities can be at risk of violence and abuse by a caregiver, who is also responsible for providing them with assistance and support with daily living. Also women and girls wi! th disabilities institutionalized as a result of their disability are at an increased risk of violence and abuse, due to the closed nature of their living space18. Not only do women and girls with disabilities face an increased risk of violence and abuse in all spheres of life, they also face barriers in accessing the vital support services to recover and escape from violence. For example, a study by the UNDP found that women with disabilities were less likely to access support, refuge or legal redress than their peers without disabilities.

Articles 15 and 16 of the CRPD protect the rights of women and girls with disabilities from torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, and from exploitation, violence and abuse, with Article 17 protecting the integrity of women and girls with disabilities. CEDAW also provides protection for women and girls with disabilities.

Specific recommendation

Responses to gender based viol! ence must address the unique aspects of violence against women and girls with disabilities, including their access to vital support and recovery services.

3. Lack of access to justice

Both the CEDAW and the CRPD protect the rights of women and girls with disabilities. However in practice many barriers exist for women and girls with disabilities in seeking justice, particularly in the area of redress for violence and abuse and control over their own bodies22. For example, in some instances there is a perception that woman with disabilities (particularly those with an intellectual disability) are not seen as ‘credible witnesses’. A study by Human Rights Watch in Uganda in 2010 reported that women and girls with disabilities they interviewed had tried to seek redress for sexual violence but failed. Also some court rulings have violated the rights of women and girls by enforcing sterilization.

Other bar! riers to women and girls accessing justice include weak implementation of laws on disability, low levels of knowledge about law and the process of participating in the formal justice system by women and girls with disabilities and finally a lack of resources to promote laws that protect the rights of persons with disabilities.

Article 12 (Equal recognition before the law) and Article 13 (Access to justice) of the CRPD and Article 15 (Law) of CEDAW protect the rights of women and girls with disabilities in accessing justice.

 

Recommendation

Measures to improve women’s access to justice must address the barriers faced by women and girls with disabilities from legal, medical and police systems and in particular include a range of measures to build capacity and knowledge of women and girls with disabilities of their rights.

4. Prejudice and discriminatory attitudes in sexual health, reproductive rights and in the right to family life

Society generally views women with disabilities as “asexual, dependent, recipients of care rather than caregivers, and generally incapable of looking after children”25. This prejudicial view of women and girls with disabilities impacts negatively on their rights to access information and programs on sexual and reproductive rights and can also manifest itself in decisions about reproduction and family planning being made by a third party in the ‘best interest! s of women with disabilities’, and in some circumstances without the consent of the woman or girl with a disability26. Additional to the barriers faced by women and girls with disabilities in accessing information enabling them to make informed choices, they also face numerous barriers due to inaccessible clinics, programs that are not inclusive of their specific needs, and the negative attitudes of staff working in this area.

Article 17 (Protecting the integrity), Article 23 (Respect for home and family) and Article 25 (Health) of the CRPD protect the rights of women and girls with disabilities to the necessary support and services related to their sexual health and also their right to have a family. Article 16 (Marriage and family life) of CEDAW also protects women and girls with disabilities.

Recommendation

Measures to support the rights of women in exercising control over their own bodies and family planning must be inclus! ive of women with disabilities.

5. Minimal participation in political and public life

Women with disabilities, much like non-disabled women, face challenges in participating in political and public life. While non-disabled women’s political participation rates are low, disabled women’s participation rates are low to non-existent. More often than not, women with disabilities are invisible during consultations and decision making processes and are under represented in civil society organizations, which represent disability, and also organizations that represent women’s issues. With respect to women with disabilities holding public office additional barriers are faced which include, legal capacity (being considered not capable to vote or to hold office due to having specific disabilities, e.g. intellectual and psychosocial), lack of access to polling stations and inaccessible voting material.

Article 29 (Participation in political and public life) of the CRPD and Article 7 (Political and public life) of the CEDAW protect the rights of women and girls with disabilities to access political and public life.

Recommendation

Action taken to improve women’s participation in political and public life must include women and girls with disabilities.

 

References

 

1  See the ‘Issues brief prepared by the TST for the Open Working Group meeting on Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment’, which highlights that despite gains made for women

in equality over the years, the inequalities faced by women and girls worldwide continue to exist and in many countries, they continue to grow. The issue brief lists a range of areas where inequalities for women and girls are reflected, for example, the higher number of women and girls living in poverty, likelihood of abuse and violence, lack of control over their own bodies, sexual health and reproduction and inequalities in the enjoyment of social and economic rights.

2  United Nations (2013). “A New Global Partnership: Eradicate Poverty and Transform Economies Through Sustainable Development: The Report of the High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda”, New York.

United Nations (2012). “Realizing the Future W! e


Want for All: Report to the Secretary General”. New York.

3  Ortoleva, S. and Lewis, H. (2012). “Forgotten sisters – a report on violence against women with disabilities: an overview of its nature, scope, causes and consequences”. School of Law Faculty Publications. Paper 184.

4  Ortoleva, S. and Frohmader, C. (2013). “The Sexual and Reproductive Rights of Women and Girls with Disabilities”. ICDP Beyond 2014, International conference on human rights, Issues paper, July 1st 2013.

5  For example, see “Issues brief prepared by

the TST for the Open Working Group meeting on

Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment”, p. 6.

6  See Female Genital Mutilation on World

Health Organization website: accessed January

20th 2014. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/

factsheets/fs241/en

 

7  UN Enable. Rights of Special Groups with Disabilities, International Norms and Standards relating to disability. Accessed January 20th

2014. http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/enable/

comp001.htm

8  Groce, N. (1997). Women with Disabilities in the Developing World, Arenas for Policy Revision and programmatic change, Journal of Disability Policy, (8), 177. It could also be reasonable then to suggest that the experience of women with disabilities falling between the gaps of gender and disability could be described as similar to that of the case made by Kimberley Crenshaw

on race and gender where she claims that the

“ intersection of racism and sexism factors into black women’s lives in ways that cannot be captured wholly by looking at the race of gender dimensions of those experiences separately; also for further reading on intersecting identities and their invisibility’ see Crenshaw, K. “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity, Politics, and Violence Against, Women of Color”. Stanford Law Review, Vol. 43, July 1991.

9  Women with Disabilities Australia. (2009). “Parenting Issues for Women with Disabilities in Australia”.

10  See pages 7 and 8 of http://www.un.org/esa/ socdev/unyin/documents/children_disability_ rights.pdf

11  International Labour Organization (ILO). (2008). “Count us In: How to make sure that women with disabilities can participate effectively in mainstream women’s entrepreneurship development activities”. ILO: Geneva.

12  Takamine, Y. (2003). “Disability Issues in East

Asia: Review and Ways Forward”. World Bank

East Asia and Pacific Region.

13  World Health Organization and World Bank. (2011). “World Report on Disability”, Geneva: WHO Press.

14  UNESCAP. (2003). Final Report of the UN ESCAP Workshop on Women and Disability: Promoting Full Participation of Women with Disabilities in the Process of Elaboration on an International Convention to Promote and

Protect the Rights and Dignity of Persons with

Disabilities. 18-22 August 2003: Bangkok.

15  International Labour Organization (ILO). (2008). “Count us In: How to make sure that women with disabilities can participate effectively in mainstream women’s entrepreneurship development activities”. ILO: Geneva.

 

16  Human Rights Watch. (2010). “As if we weren’t human: Discrimination and Violence Against Disabled Women”. Uganda.

17  United Nations. (2012). Report of the Special Rapporteur on Violence against women, its causes and consequences. http://www.ohchr. org/Documents/Issues/Women/A.67.227.pdf

18  Ortoleva, S. and Lewis, H. (2012). “Forgotten sisters- a report on violence against women with disabilities: an overview of its nature, scope, causes and consequences”. School of Law Faculty Publications. Paper 184.

CBM Australia and AusAID (2013) “Triple Jeopardy – a study of violence against women with disabilities in Cambodia”.

19  UNDP (2009). “Pacific sisters with disabilities:

at the intersection of discrimination”, UNDP

Pacific Centre: Fiji.

20  Human Rights Watch (2010). “As if we weren’t human: Discrimination and Violence Against Disabled Women”. Uganda.

21  Ibid.

22  Ortoleva, S. “Women with Disabilities and

the Justice System: Rights without Remedies”,

A blog from The World Justice Project. Accessed January 20th 2014. http://worldjusticeproject. org/blog/women-disabilities-and-justice-system- rights-without-remedies

23  Human Rights Watch (2010). “As if we weren’t human: Discrimination and Violence Against Disabled Women”. Uganda.

24  For further reading see CBM Australia and AusAID, “Triple Jeopardy – a study of violence against women with disabilities in Cambodia” (2013).

25  Women with Disabilities Australia (WWDA). (2009). “Parenting Issues for Women with Disabilities in Australia”. A policy paper by WWDA: Australia.

26  Ortoleva, S. and Frohmader, C. (2013).

“The Sexual and Reproductive Rights of Women and Girls with Disabilities”. ICDP Beyond 2014, International conference on human rights, Issues paper, July 1st 2013.

27  Human Rights Watch (2012). “I Want To Be

A Citizen Just Like Any Other. Barriers to Political Participation for People with Disabilities in Peru”. Human Rights Watch: USA.
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Description of the COP 19 Ed. Caucus-Climate Change Event
In response to the 2012 COP 18 Decision on Gender Equity and the COP 18 adoption of the Doha work program for Article 6 (Education) of the Convention, the purpose of the event is to generate insights and recommendations that will be compiled into a policy briefing submitted to the Global Gender and Climate Alliance constituency, the UNFCCC Secretariat, and through communications with our various global networks.

 

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The Environment and Gender Index (EGI)
In just three weeks IUCN’s Global Gender Office will release rankings for 72 countries as part of the Environment and Gender Index (EGI), the world’s first tool to monitor progress toward gender equality in the context of global environmental governance.
A sneak peek of the Index shows
  • Poland ranks highest worldwide in the category of ecosystem, but lowest in the livelihood category in the region.
  • Liberia scores in the top tier of countries where women have equal access to credit, land and property, as does Algeria.
  • Sweden ranks highest for women in policy-making positions.
  • Jamaica ranks highest worldwide on women legislators, managers and senior officials.
  • Mongolia is the top performer in the Asian region and ranks extraordinarily high globally, but is low on women in policy-making positions and protection of property rights.
The EGI will provide the best quantitative data to date on how nations are translating gender and environment mandates into national policy and planning. The index shows that nations which take seriously their commitment to tackling women’s advancement in their environmental efforts are making huge strides beyond survival to long term well-being for all their citizens.
The Index has already been nominated for the prestigious Katerva Award, described by the Reuters Foundation as “the Nobel of sustainability.” The Award engages global thought leaders from business, government, NGOs, and academia to track down the world’s best sustainability initiatives.
When the index is launched on 19 November during the 19th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC COP19) in Warsaw, leaders of 72 nations will know how their efforts are measuring up. The EGI ranks and scores 72 developed and developing countries along 27 dimensions divided into six categories: Livelihood, Ecosystem, Gender-based Rights & Participation, Governance, Gender-based Education and Assets, and Country-Reported Activities.
To sign up for updates or to confirm attendance at the launch of the Environment and
Gender Index on 19 November 2013 at the global climate change negotiations, go to environmentgenderindex.org/contact
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Gender and Climate Change
The ultimate objective of the UNFCCC, as stated in its Article 2, is to stabilize                                          greenhouse gas concentrations “in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent  dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system”. It is                                          increasingly evident that women are at the centre of the climate change challenge. Women are disproportionately affected by climate change impacts, such as droughts,                                          floods and other extreme weather events, but they also have a critical role in                                          combatting climate change.
Connecting Climate and                                                Gender
Gender under the COP UNFCCC Gender balance Linking gender and climate                                                change
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Gender under the COP
COP 18 in DohaAt its eighteenth session, the COP adopted a decision on promoting gender balance and                                          improving the participation of women in UNFCCC negotiations and in the representation                                          of Parties in bodies established pursuant to the Convention or the Kyoto Protocol.  The decision 23/CP.18 can be found in the                                           COP 18 report.COP 18 requested Parties and observer organizations to submit to the secretariat                                          their views on options and ways to advance the goal of gender balance in bodies established pursuant to the Convention and the Kyoto Protocol, in order to improve      women’s participation and inform more effective climate change policy that  addresses the needs of women and men equally (para 2 and 11 of decision                                           23/CP.18). Submissions have been received from Parties  and Observers. A miscellaneous document on options and ways to advance the gender balance goal has been compiled, which can be found                                           here.The upcoming COP 19 in WarsawFor the item on “Gender and Climate Change”, documents for consideration                                          are:
  • The report on gender composition. Note by the secretariat (FCCC/CP/2013/4).
  • A miscellaneous document on options and ways to advance the gender balance goal.                                          Submissions from Parties and observer organizations (FCCC/CP/2013/MISC.2).

UNFCCC Gender balanceSince COP 18 in Doha, the UNFCCC secretariat has been tracking gender balance in                                          UNFCCC constituted bodies and at relevant meetings. The data is being compiled and will be available via this webpage in the second quarter of 2013. The report mandated in the COP 18 decision has been published: Report on Gender Composition. Note by the secretariat.Linking gender and climate changeGender and adaptation Integrating considerations of gender into medium- and long-term adaptation can help to ensure                                          that adaptation is effective and implementable on the ground. It can help to ensure                                          that the implementation of adaptation activities will not exacerbate inequalities and other vulnerabilities, it can help to fulfil the specific needs of the most                                          vulnerable, and it can ensure the equal participation of men and women in the decision-making and implementation phases of these activities. Women can act as                                          agents of change at different levels of the adaptation process.Gender and financial support A gender perspective needs to be taken into account when developing resource mobilization                                          strategies, applying climate finance instruments, and ensuring equal participation in                                          the deployment of financial resources, particularly at the local level.Gender and mitigation Action to mitigate climate change has the potential to also bring about local                                          gender-positive impacts. This may be achieved by the general nature of a mitigation project or programme, such as clean energy for household lighting or cooking, or by                                          gender equity impacts being specifically considered early in the project planning                                          stage e.g. considering where revenues will flow. Projects under the Protocol’s flexible mechanisms, CDM and JI, have shown themselves to have                                          potentially positive impacts on the lives of women – by improving livelihoods and health and allowing time for the pursuit of additional opportunities.Gender and technology support  The development and transfer of environmentally sound technologies represent an                                          opportunity to increase efforts on gender mainstreaming with regard to technology access and information and training on the use of appropriate technologies.Gender and capacity-building  support A gender-sensitive approach to creating, developing and strengthening institutional,                                          systemic and human-resource capacity-building can foster gender balance in                                          decision-making on, delivery of and access to means and tools of implementation for  mitigation of adaptation actions.In FocusMomentum for Change: Women for Results showcases women-led activities that address climate                                          change. These “lighthouse activities” will demonstrate measurable impact on the ground, and the potential for replicability and scalability at the local,                                          national and international levels.Upcoming events            Events to take place at the upcoming COP 19 session in Warsaw include:

  • An in-session workshop This workshop will be on gender balance in                                            the UNFCCC process, gender-sensitive climate policy and capacity-building activities to promote the greater participation of women in the UNFCCC                                            process.  It was mandated by COP 18 (para  10 of decision 23/CP.18) and will take place on Tuesday 12 November 2013, 15:00-18:00.   More information on the workshop can be found here.
  • Gender Day on Tuesday 19 NovemberDuring this day, a high-level                                            event, side events and other activities dedicated to the topic of gender will take place in Warsaw.
  • The in-session high-level event under the Conference of the Parties, entitled Vision 50/50: Women for Action on Climate Change will take place in the conference premises in Warsaw, on Tuesday,  19 November 2013 from 11:30 to 13:00. The event will be open to Parties and observers. The provisional programme and additional information on the event will be announced on the UNFCCC website soon.

Previous events

Lunchtime event: Promoting gender balance and the empowerment of women in the                                          UNFCCC process, 7 June 2013 On June 7, during the UN Climate Change Conference June 2013 (SB 38), UN Women, MRFCJ, GGCA, UNFCCC                                          secretariat organized a side event on promoting gender balance and the empowerment of women in the UNFCCC process. This lunchtime event brought together Parties, observers, UN System entities, experts, civil society representatives and other stakeholders who shared insights and discussed effort  to strengthen gender balance, enhance the empowerment of women in the UNFCCC process,  and advance gender-sensitive climate policy. The event also marked the launch of a desk research conducted by UN Women and MRFCJ on “Advancing the goal of gender balance in multilateral and intergovernmental processes”.

pdf-icon Concept note (429 kB) A summary of the above event appears in the 7 June edition of the Earth Negotiations Bulletin  ‘On the Side’ (scroll down for ‘Promoting Gender Balance and the Empowerment of Women in the UNFCCC Process’)

Twitter chat with Christiana Figueres and the GGCA on the COP 18 Gender                                         

Decision, 14 May 2013 On 14 May, Executive Secretary Christiana Figueres engaged on Twitter on the COP 18 Gender Decision. The live Twitter chat was                                          hosted by the Global Gender and Climate  Alliance (GGCA) and focused on the key objectives of the decision. View Storify version of the chat.

Publicationspdf-icon CDM and Women

pdf-icon The Rio Conventions: Action on Gender

pdf-icon The Full View: Advancing the goal of gender balance in multilateral and intergovernmental processes

(research report by UN Women Research report by  UN Women and the Mary Robinson Foundation – Climate Justice)

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