Post-2015 Development Agenda

 

 

 

UN MY WORLD Toolkit

 

 UN POST 2515 glob_dev_rep_2013

 http://worldviewmission.nl/?page_id=6920

http://worldviewmission.nl/?page_id=12236

http://worldviewmission.nl/?page_id=134

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http://www.worldwewant2015.org/civilsociety2015

http://www.stakeholderforum.org/fileadmin/files/SD2015%20Brochure%20%28online%29.pdf

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Worldview-Mission/318578334945230?ref=hl

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Worldview-Mission/115182681906542

 

 http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/post-2015/E-bulletin/e-bulletin-03_EN_June_2014.pdf

 

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SYMPOSIUM @ UN Integrating sustainability into the Post-2015 Development Agenda

 

Dear SDG-L subscribers,

The United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability (UNU-IAS) and Millennium Promise Japan (MPJ) are pleased to invite you to the symposium “Integrating Sustainability into the Post-2015 Development Agenda” to be held in Tokyo, Japan on Thursday, 2 October 2014, featuring a keynote speech by Prof. Jeffrey Sachs (Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University).

“Integrating Sustainability into the Post-2015 Development Agenda”
Venue: U Thant International Conference Hall, United Nations University, Tokyo, Japan

 

Dates/Times: 2 October 2014, 14:00-16:40
Organizers: UNU-IAS and Millennium Promise Japan
Supporter: Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
Fee: Free

 

Online registration: http://ias.unu.edu/en/events/upcoming/integrating-sustainability-into-the-post-2015-development-agenda.html

While the international community is accelerating its efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015, the discussion on the post-2015 development agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is gathering momentum. At the same time, Japan’s Official Development Assistance programmes are now marking their 60th anniversary. In this context, the integration of sustainability into the global development agenda is a critical issue to consider in understanding and promoting international cooperation beyond the MDGs.

This symposium will feature a keynote speech by Professor Jeffrey Sachs (Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University), a panel discussion by experts in this field, and an interactive session.

In his keynote speech, Professor Sachs will address current debates associated with the MDGs and introduce the progress of the Millennium Villages Project. His speech will draw upon lessons learned from the MDGs to explore international debates and trends related to the post-2015 development agenda.

A panel discussion featuring several other experts will then consider ways of integrating sustainability into the post-2015 development framework, bringing a variety of perspectives on the formulation and implementation of the post-2015 development agenda and the SDGs.

Following the panel, an interactive session will provide an opportunity for participants to exchange views with the speakers, facilitating open discussion.

Simultaneous Japanese-English interpretation will be provided for this symposium.

For more information, including the event programme, please visit the event page on the UNU-IAS website (http://ias.unu.edu/en/events/upcoming/integrating-sustainability-into-the-post-2015-development-agenda.html). 


Makiko ARIMA (Ms.)
Communications Associate
United Nations University
Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability (UNU-IAS) 53-70, Jingumae 5-chome Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8925, Japan
Tel: +81-3-5467-1212
Email: arima@unu.edu
URL: http://www.ias.unu.edu
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UNU.IAS

 

2 pièces jointes 

Prévisualiser la pièce jointe Flyer for ICUH 2015 and BD Summit Side Event.jpg 

Flyer for ICUH 2015 and BD Summit Side Event.jpg 

Prévisualiser la pièce jointe Flyer.pdf

 Flyer.pdf 

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 WORLD WE WANT
QUESTION 2: What do you think needs to be added to the current Open Working Group proposal, especially in relation to Addressing Inequalities?
Discussion by soshea@unicef.org

15 Sep 2014 [ read more ]

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[Beyond 2015:318] B2015 webinar July 29: OWG13 analysis – análisis GTA13 – analyse GTO13

Español abajo) (Francais ci-dessous)

On Tuesday 29 July at 9.30am New York time (2.30pm London, 3.30pm Brussels, 4.30pm Nairobi), there will be a webinar with:

  • Naiara Costa (Beyond 2015 Advocacy Director)
  • Bernadette Fischler (WWF, UK)
  • Lina Dabbagh (CAN International, Beyond 2015)
  • Mwangi Waituru (Participate and The Seed Institute, Kenya)
  • Freya Seath (BioRegional)
  • Alessandra Nilo (Gestos, Brazil)

This will be an opportunity for B2015 participating organisations to hear

feedback and analysis of the final session of the OWG, and share ideas about the way forward.

If you would like to register for the call, please email me on
fhale@beyond2015.org.  Please note I am on leave next week, so will not reply straight away! Please email me to register, and I will send you the webinar login details on Monday 28 July.

El martes 29 de junio a las 9.30 EDT (15.30 CET), habrá un webinario con

  • Naiara Costa (Directora de Incidencia, Beyond 2015)
  • Bernadette Fischler (WWF, UK)
  • Lina Dabbagh (CAN International, Beyond 2015)
  • Mwangi Waituru (Participate and The Seed Institute, Kenya)
  • Freya Seath (BioRegional)
  • Alessandra Nilo (Gestos, Brazil)

El webinario será una oportunidad para organizaciones participantes de Beyond 2015 de compartir el análisis de esta ultima reunión del Grupo de Trabajo Abierto y ideas sobre los próximos pasos.

(El webinario se llevará a cabo en inglés.)

 Para inscribirse, enviar un mensaje a fhale@beyond2015.org.  Estaré fuera de la oficina la semana que viene: enviaré los datos del WebEx a todos los interesados el lunes 28 de julio

Mardi le 29 juillet à 9.30h EDT (15.30 CET), webinaire avec 

  • Naiara Costa (Directrice de Plaidoyer Beyond 2015)
  • Bernadette Fischler (WWF, UK)
  • Lina Dabbagh (CAN International, Beyond 2015)
  • Mwangi Waituru (Participate and The Seed Institute, Kenya)
  • Freya Seath (BioRegional)
  • Alessandra Nilo (Gestos, Brazil)

Ce webinaire sera une opportunité pour les organizations

qui participent à Beyond 2015 de partager l’analyse de cette dernière réunion du
Groupe de Travail Ouvert et des idées sur les prochains pas.

(Le webinaire aura lieu en anglais.)

Pour vous inscrire, veuillez envoyer un message a fhale@beyond2015.org.  Veuillez noter que je serai en congé la semaine prochaine: j’enverrai les détails d’inscription au webinaire le lundi 28 Juillet.

 Fiona Hale

Beyond 2015 International Officer

Working from Newcastle, UK

Email: fhale@beyond2015.org                 Skype: fionahale (Newcastle, England)

Cellphone +44 (0) 796999 6343

Please note that I don’t work on Friday.

www.beyond2015.org 

Follow Beyond 2015 on Twitter @Beyond2015 and Facebook

Based at: Concord a.i.s.b.l

10 Rue de l’Industrie, 1000 Brussels

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[Beyond 2015:317] OWG12 webinar report – informe del webinario sobre GAT12 – rapport du webinaire sur GTO12

Dear Beyond 2015 campaign, Chère campagne Beyond 2015, Querida campaña Beyond 2015,

Now available on the Beyond 2015 website (www.beyond2015.org): Report of the June 30 webinar to share analysis of OWG12 among B2015 participating organisations.  
Maintenant disponible sur le site de Beyond 2015 (www.beyond2015.org): Rapport du webinaire du 30 juin pour partager entre les organizations qui participent à Beyond 2015 l’analyse de la 12eme réunion du Groupe de Travail Ouvert
 

Ahora disponible en el sitio web de Beyond 2015 (www.beyond2015.org): Informe del webinario del 30 de junio para compartir entre las organizaciones participantes de Beyond 2015 el análisis de la 12a reunión del Grupo de Trabajo Abierto. 

Fiona Hale

Beyond 2015 International Officer

Email: fhale@beyond2015.org

Skype: fionahale (Newcastle, England)

Cellphone +44 (0) 796999 6343

Please note that I don’t work on Friday. 

www.beyond2015.org 

Follow Beyond 2015 on Twitter @Beyond2015 and Facebook 

We want to know your opinion! Make sure you send your feedback on Beyond 2015′s latest drafts on the Vision,PurposeValues and Criteria for the post-2015 framework! 

Begin forwarded message: 

Subject: OWG12 webinar report – informe del webinario sobre GAT12 – rapport du webinaire sur GTO12

 To: “beyond2015@googlegroups.com” <beyond2015@googlegroups.com> 

Now available at  Monday 30 June at 9am New York time (3pm CET), there will be a webinar
with 

  • Naiara Costa (Beyond 2015 Advocacy Director), 
  • Arelys Bellorini (Beyond 2015 UN Working Group and World Vision International), 
  • Sowmyaa Bharadwaj (Praxis India), 
  • George Ndungu (B2015 Co-Chair and Organisation of African Youth) 

and others from the campaign who were at OWG12. This
will be an opportunity for B2015 participating organisations to share
feedback and analysis of OWG-12, and discuss future plans.

If you would like to register for the call, please email me on
fhale@beyond2015.org.

(Español abajo) (Francais ci-dessous)

El lunes 30 de junio a las 9.00 EDT (15.00 CET), habrá un webinario con

  • Naiara Costa (Directora de Incidencia, Beyond 2015), 
  • Arelys Bellorini (Grupo de Trabajo de B2015 sobre ONU, y World Vision International),
  • Sowmyaa Bharadwaj (Praxis India), 
  • George Ndungu (Co-Presidente de B2015 y Organisation of African Youth), 

y otros quienes estuvieron presentes en Nueva York la semana pasada. El webinario será una oportunidad para
organizaciones participantes de Beyond 2015 de compartir el análisis de la
12a reunión del Grupo de Trabajo Abierto y los próximos pasos.

(El webinario se llevará a cabo en inglés.)

Para inscribirse, enviar un mensaje a fhale@beyond2015.org

Lundi le 30 juin à 9h EDT (15.00 CET), webinaire avec

  • Naiara Costa (Directrice de Plaidoyer Beyond 2015), 
  • Arelys Bellorini (Groupe de Travail de B2015 sur l’ONU et World Vision International), 
  • Sowmyaa Bharadwaj (Praxis India), 
  • George Ndungu (Co-Président B2015 et Organisation of African Youth). 

Ce webinaire sera une opportunité pour les organizations
qui participent à Beyond 2015 de partager l’analyse de la 12eme réunion du
Groupe de Travail Ouvert et les prochains pas dans le processus.

(Le webinaire aura lieu en anglais.)

Fiona Hale

Beyond 2015 International Officer

Email: fhale@beyond2015.org

Skype: fionahale (Newcastle, England)

Cellphone +44 (0) 796999 6343

Please note that I don’t work on Friday. 

www.beyond2015.org 

Follow Beyond 2015 on Twitter @Beyond2015 and Facebook 

We want to know your opinion! Make sure you send your feedback on Beyond 2015′s latest drafts on the Vision,PurposeValues and Criteria for the post-2015 framework!

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Beyond the “Partnersh​ips” Approach: Corporate Accountabi​lity Post-2015

Dear colleagues,
Global Policy Forum is pleased to share our second Briefing #2 on corporate influence in the United Nations, at the conclusion of the second meeting of the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) and just preceding the thirteenth and final session of the Open Working Group (OWG) on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). So far, neither the OWG nor the HLPF has begun to define how powerful actors, including transnational corporations, will be held to account for their contributions — or damages – to sustainable development or to the lives and livelihoods of the people claimed to be at its center.
Our latest message, Beyond the “Partnerships” Approach: Corporate Accountability Post-2015, examines the 30 June draft of the report of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals, identifying evidence of corporate influence and highlighting recommendations – for both States and their “partners” – to ensure meaningful corporate accountability in the post-2015 agenda. We hope you find it interesting and useful reading.
See also Briefing #1, Privatizing Global Governance: Corporate Influence at the United Nationsand our new web portal on Corporate Influence.
Sign up for the Global Policy Forum listserv here, and follow us on Twitter.
Best regards,
Kathryn (Katie) Tobin

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THE CAMPAIGN IS GROWING!
NOW MORE THAN 1000 PARTICIPATING ORGANISATIONS IN MORE THAN
130 COUNTRIES

The campaign now includes over 1000 organisations! The 1000th organisation to join the campaign was the Fahari Yetu Foundation in Tanzania. Brigitha Faustin of the Fehari Yetu Foundation says,

“We joined Beyond 2015 campaign to ensure that the voices of marginalized youth, women, girls and people living with disabilities, and their rights to and needs for access to clean and safe water, peace and stability, education, health care, energy, better jobs, free from hunger and inequalities in Africa, are integrated and given priority in Post 2015 development agenda”   

Welcome to the Fahari Yetu Foundation!

 

BEYOND 2015 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Please see the notes from the May meeting of the Executive Committee here.

Remember, we have a ‘suggestions box’ for the Executive Committee (an email address which is available for the whole campaign, which will be checked by the Secretariat and co-chairs before each Executive Committee meeting). If you have comments, constructive criticisms or suggestions on how to strengthen Beyond 2015, please send them to greatideas4beyond2015@gmail.com! Suggestions will be considered on the next monthly call

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ik=9013c5621d&view=lg&msg=146b6389ccf00858

JUNIO 2014
NOVEDADES DE LAS DIFERENTES ESTRUCTURAS DE LA CAMPANA
AFRICAASIALATINOAMERICAPACIFICOEUROPA
PARTICIPATECPS
COMITE EJECUTIVO

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Common Africa Position (CAP) on the Post 2015 Developmen​t Agenda

The participatory approach that led to the elaboration of the common african Position (CAP) on the post-2015 development agenda involving stakeholders at the national, regional and continental levels among the public and private sectors, parliamentarians, civil society organizations (CSOs), including women and youth associations, and academia. this approach has helped address the consultation gap in the initial preparation and formulation of the millennium development goals (MDGs).

Common Africa Position (CAP) on the Post 2015 Development Agenda African Union  March 2014

Common Africa Position (CAP) on the Post 2015 Development Agenda(PDF - 4.1 Mo)

 

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Participat​e in e-Discussi​on on “Partnersh​ips with Civil Society” for HLPF & more

http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?ca=182543ea-e8f3-4ea9-a31d-c478f114486d&c=4dfe1e60-ac44-11e3-92f9-d4ae528440e0&ch=4edda8f0-ac44-11e3-9359-d4ae528440e0

 

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Call for endorsemen​ts to the Social Solidarity Economy Recommenda​tions to the Post-2015 Agenda

Dear friends,
During the 5th International Meeting of Social Solidarity      Economy (SSE) in Manila on October 2013, RIPESS (Intercontinental      Network for the Promotion of SSE) launched an open process of      consultation on what should be the recommendations from SSE to the      post-2015 agenda. Now the process has finished and we are calling      for support from different civil society organizations to them.

The        deadline for endorsements is June 30, Monday.
The document and the formular for endorsing are online in

English, Spanish and French at the following links:
English:       http://www.ripess.org/social-solidarity-economy-recommendations-for-the-post-2015-development-agenda/?lang=en

Spanish:       http://www.ripess.org/recomendaciones-de-la-economia-social-solidaria-para-la-agenda-de-desarrollo-post-2015/?lang=es

French:       http://www.ripess.org/recommandations-de-leconomie-sociale-solidaire-pour-lagenda-de-developpement-post-2015/
The recommendations (with the list of organizations) will be      formally presented to the UN State Members and Agencies during the      second meeting of the High Level Political Forum (HLPF) on the      first days of July.
That’s why we unfortunately have a very short time for      adhering.
If your organization is aligned to the recommendations, we ask      you please to sign and to make it circulate widely. If you have      any doubts or need more information, please let me know.

Thank you!
daniel tygel (RIPESS) –

Paul Quintos
IBON International
3rd Flr., IBON Center
114 Timog Avenue,
Quezon City 1103
Philippines
Telefax: +63 2 9276981

Skype ID: paul.quintos
Websites: iboninternational.org
peoplesgoals.org

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CONF CALL INSTRUCTIO​NS Fwd: Opportunit​y to meet with co-chairs of post 2015 modalities June 18, 8-9 AM

Subject: Re: Opportunity to meet with co-chairs of post 2015 modalities June 18, 8-9 AM

Dear OPs,

For those who won’t be able to attend the meeting in person, there will be an opportunity to dial in to listen to the discussion.

Bridge Number: 1 917 367 5313
Meeting ID number: 16871869

Instructions

1. Dial 1-917-367-5313.

2. You will be greeted with a Welcome prompt.

3. Enter the Meeting ID number you received from the meeting host or organizer, and then press the # key to confirm.

4. You will then be joined into the meeting

Additionally, colleagues are kindly invited to place their phones on mute so as to minimize any background sound.

Given the limited time for the dialogue held in NY in the margins of the OWG session as part of a continuing dialogue with the Co-facilitators, The bridge line will be available for colleagues to listen to the briefing by the Co-facilitators and to continue for the entire session.

Warm regards,

 

 

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Will post-2015 development  proposals meet the Human Rights Litmus Test?

As   UN member states begin negotiations on a new set of          Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), CESR and its allies have          called for all proposals to be subjected to a ‘Human Rights Litmus Test’.
Speaking today at the High Level Event of the General Assembly          on the Contributions of Human Rights and the Rule of Law in          the Post-2015 Development Agenda, CESR’s Niko Lusiani outlined  eight key questions against which to evaluate whether          current proposals contained in the zero draft of the SDGs          respect and reflect existing human rights commitments.
These include whether the proposals:

  • support human rights            comprehensively, taking into consideration their            universality, indivisibility and interdependence
  • ensure full transparency            and meaningful participation of all people, especially the            most disadvantaged, in decision-making at all levels
  • ensure human rights            accountability of all development actors
  • guarantee that the            private sector respects human rights
  • combat inequality and end            discrimination in all its forms, including economic            inequality within and between countries
  • specifically and            comprehensively support girls’ and women’s rights
  • secure a minimum floor of            social protection and socioeconomic well-being for all
  • ensure that any global            partnerships for development are aligned with human rights

The          Human Rights Litmus Test sets out detailed criteria for          assessing each of these questions, providing a tool for those          involved in the design of the SDGs to systematically evaluate          the proposals emerging from the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals (OWG).
“Human rights, including the right to development, must have          real operational significance in guiding sustainable          development policy and practice this time around”, said Niko,          one of three civil society panelists invited to address the          session.
The Litmus Test was developed by the Post-2015 Human Rights Caucus,          a global coalition of human rights, development,          environmental, feminist and trade union organizations,          co-convened by CESR, the Association  for Women’s Rights in Development and Amnesty  International, which has been advocating for human          rights to form the bedrock of the new sustainable development          goals.
While many national governments attending the debate affirmed          the central importance of human rights and the rule of law to          the future sustainable development agenda, it remains to be          seen whether their rhetorical declarations do indeed translate          into a transformative framework of goals and measurable          commitments in the final proposals to be submitted by the Open          Working Group to the General Assembly in September.
CESR and its allies will be working to ensure human rights not          only inform the content of the new goals, but their means of  implementation, including arrangements for financing, monitoring and accountability.

  • To download a pdf  version of the ‘Post-2015 Human Rights Litmus Test’, click here.

  • To learn more about CESR’s work on human rights and development, see  here.

CESR Logo

 

The Center for              Economic and Social Rights (CESR) works to promote social              justice through human rights. In a world where poverty and              inequality deprive entire communities of dignity, justice              and sometimes life, we seek to uphold the universal human              rights of every human being to education, health, food,              water, housing, work, and other economic, social and              cultural rights essential to human dignity.

Center for Economic              and Social Rights | 162 Montague Street, 3rd Floor,              Brooklyn, NY 11201 | +1 718 237-9145 | info@cesr.org

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Please disseminate                widely… 

Call for              endorsements: ‘Human Rights for All Post-2015 Litmus Test’

The time is now to ensure human rights is            at the core of the            new sustainable development agenda.

As negotiations over the post-2015            sustainable development            framework move into their final phase, there is a serious            threat that national            governments’ rhetorical commitments to human rights will be            watered down. Over            the past few months, the Post-2015 Human Rights Caucus, a            global coalition of            development, environment, trade union, feminist and human            rights organizations,            has been pushing for the full incorporation of human rights            in the new            development agenda. In order to ensure the proposals of the            Open Working Group            on Sustainable Development Goals, which will be debated            throughout June,            provide a roadmap for a genuinely transformative framework,            the Caucus has            prepared a Human Rights for All              Post-2015 Litmus Test as a unique tool to evaluate            whether proposals for            the post-2015 framework respect and reflect pre-existing            human rights norms,            standards and commitments.

The significant impact of our previous            joint statement – Human Rights              For All Post-2015 -            was largely due to the broad backing it received, with over            350 organizations            from all over the world signing up. We are now calling for            endorsements of the Human Rights for All              Post-2015 Litmus Test (below and              attached).

If your organization            would like to offer its backing, please fill out the online form              here by 6pm EST on Monday 9           June. You can also forward your organization’s            logo to CESR Communications            Coordinator Luke Holland at: lholland@cesr.org.

Endorse the Human Rights for All Post-2015 Litmus Test          here.

Human                Rights for All Post-2015: A Litmus Test, June 2014

The Post-2015 Human Rights              Caucus              was born in 2013 as a cross-constituency coalition of              development, environment,              trade union, feminist and human rights organizations              worldwide to lay out a roadmap for             embedding  human rights into the core of the              post-2015              sustainable development agenda.[1]              As              the Open Working Group’s (OWG) efforts near completion and              the full-blown              political negotiations begin, the Post-2015 Human Rights              Caucus has developed              this Litmus Test to be used to evaluate whether proposals              for the post-2015              framework respect and reflect pre-existing human rights              norms, standards and              commitments, in line with the Rio+20 agreement that              sustainable development goals              be “consistent with international law”. This series of              questions and criteria              not only clearly articulate our bottom-line expectations              for the outcomes of              the post-2015 sustainable development process, but also              provides a unique tool              for all those involved to more objectively assess whether              post-2015 proposals              truly encapsulate what the UN Secretary General envisioned              as “a far-reaching              vision of the future firmly anchored in human rights.”[2]

Do  the post-2015 sustainable development  framework proposals…

Test 1: Support human rights comprehensively, taking into consideration their                universality,                indivisibility and interdependence?

a.                     Apply universally              to all people in all countries, while recognizing local              realities.

b.                    Frame all              goals and targets consistently with existing human rights              obligations.

c.                     Improve              the              accessibility, availability, acceptability, and quality of              goods and services              essential to realizing economic, social and cultural              rights, in particular the              human rights to health, education, food, water,              sanitation, housing and social              security.

d.                    Include concrete              targets to protect civil and political rights, in              particular the freedoms              of expression, association, peaceful protest, political              participation, access              to information, and guarantees an enabling environment for              civil society and              human rights and environmental defenders.

Test 2:                Ensure                full transparency and meaningful participation of all                people, especially the                most disadvantaged, in decision-making at all levels?

a.                     Ensure the              right to prompt and effective access to high-quality              information on public              policies, including on budget, financial and tax policies,              disaggregated on the              basis of various grounds of discrimination, including              compound and intersecting              forms.

b.                    Secure active              and meaningful participation of all without fear in the              design, implementation,              and monitoring of all relevant policies and programs, and              in decisions about              how they are resourced.

Test 3:                Ensure                human rights accountability of all development actors?

a.                     Support citizen-led              systems of monitoring of performance in meeting the goals.

b.                    Ensure human              rights accountability domestically, including by securing              for all the              right to effective remedy for civil, political, social,              economic, cultural and              environmental human rights abuses through equal access to              and confidence in              effective, accountable and impartial justice systems.

c.                     Ensure human  rights accountability internationally, including by              supporting access to   effective remedy for those people adversely affected by              policies which have   spillover effects across borders.

d.        Eradicate existing     barriers to justice, particularly for people in poverty  and other  disadvantaged groups.

Test 4:   Guarantee      that the private sector respects human rights?

a.                     Promote effective              legislative and regulatory measures to guarantee in              practice that all              companies act in line with international human rights law              and the UN Guiding              Principles on Business and Human Rights.

b.                    Introduce mandatory,              independent assessments and periodic public reporting of              the human              rights and sustainable development impacts of large              businesses.

Test 5: Combat inequality                and end discrimination in all its forms?

a.                     Guarantee timely              collection of disaggregated data on the basis of the most              nationally-relevant grounds of disparity and              discrimination, taking into              account compound and intersecting discrimination.

b.                    Ensure that              any non-zero or non-universal sectoral commitments are              complemented by              time-bound targets to progressively eliminate inequalities              between groups by              prioritizing a more ambitious rate of progress for those              most disadvantaged              groups.

c.                     Combat              economic              inequality within and between countries.

d.                    Protect decent              work and fundamental worker’s rights for all, reducing   unfair income  disparities.

e.   Seek   to  eradicate cross-border tax evasion, return stolen assets,  forgive odious debt   and progressively combat tax abuses as critical  instruments to reduce inequality              between countries.

Test 6:    Specifically and comprehensively support girls’ and women’s rights?

a.  Ensure all  individuals meaningful access, including financial access,  to acceptable,  available, and quality sexual and reproductive health  information and services   and full sexual and reproductive autonomy.

b.  Prevent, investigates  and punishes all forms of gender-based violence, including  harmful  traditional practices.

c.  Increase the  share of women’s control over land, property, productive and natural  resources, their economic independence, access to labor  market and political  participation.

d.  Reduce the  burden of unpaid care work.

e.    Eliminate the  multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination women  and girls  face, and entails a series of positive measures to overcome structural  discrimination and ensure substantive enjoyment of  equality.

f.   Ensure that   gender equality and girls’ and women’s rights are   mainstreamed throughout  all goals, including by developing gender-sensitive  targets under other goals.

Test 7: Secure  a minimum floor of socioeconomic well-being for all?

a.  Embrace a universal or zero target approach for all minimum core economic and social rights obligations, such as nutritionally adequate and  safe food to ensure all              people’s freedom from hunger, free primary education, essential primary              healthcare, and a basic essential level of safe water.

b.  Guarantee a quality social protection floor for all, in line with  human rights and ILO recommendation 202.

Test 8:  Ensure that any global partnerships for sustainable                development are aligned with human rights?        

a. Ensure human rights-guided policy coherence, with governments and              international  financial institutions mandated to conduct independent and  periodic public assessments of  the human rights and sustainable development cross-border impacts of their policies and agreements, particularly  those related to trade, investment, aid, tax, migration,  intellectual property, debt, monetary policies and financial regulation.

b.  Include  clear,  time-bound commitments for all actors in development,              including high-income  ountries, international institutions and large businesses.

c.  Develop a  robust, multi-faceted global monitoring and accountability              framework which tracks the compliance and accountability of all development actors to their  commitments, including high-income countries,  international institutions and  large businesses, with full civil society participation  and in constructive  interaction with the human rights protection regime.

The Joint Statement by the   Caucus, “Human  Rights for All Post-2015,” has been  endorsed by over 350 organizations, followed up by a   joint statement ahead of                  OWG 11, ‘OWG inches closer to human  rights for all post-2015,  but still a long road ahead.’

[2]  Report of theSecretary-General for the 68th   session of the UN General Assembly, 2013 “A life of dignity for all: accelerating progress towards the Millennium                  Development Goals and advancing  the United Nations development agenda beyond 2015.”

-- 
Paul Quintos
IBON International
3rd Flr., IBON Center
114 Timog Avenue,
Quezon City 1103
Philippines
Telefax: +63 2 9276981

Skype ID: paul.quintos
Websites: iboninternational.org
peoplesgoals.org

HRsinSDGsLitmusTest-2pager-5June-final.docx

HRsinSDGsLitmusTest-2pager-5June-final.docx

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Beyond 2015: The Education We Want

Beyond 2015: The Education We Want

The Permanent Missions of Argentina, Brazil, and Norway are delighted to invite you and representatives of your mission and/or organizations to attend a side-event on education in the post-2015 development agenda at the United Nations during the 12th Session of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals. This meeting is facilitated by UNESCO and UNICEF.

Beyond 2015: The Education We Want

Monday 16th June
13:15-14:45

UN Library Auditorium, New York
Light lunch will be served at 12.50

Speakers will include: DPR Brazil; DPR Argentina; Chair of the EFA Steering Committee; Global Campaign for Education; Education International; UNESCO and UNICEF

During the 2014 Global EFA Meeting, held in Oman on 12-14 May 2014, education leaders adopted the Muscat Agreement. In doing so, they endorsed a shared vision for the post-2015 education agenda, including an overarching goal for education and a set of seven global targets for education beyond 2015. This Agreement represents the current vision of key education stakeholders on education beyond 2015, and is an important milestone in the development of the post-2015 education agenda.

This Information Meeting will present and discuss the global vision and scope of the future education agenda as well as the seven targets, proposed indicators and next steps.

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Two opportunit​ies to discuss the intergover​nmental process to define modalities for the post-2015 Summit

Dear Colleagues,
We are writing to inform you of two opportunities to join discussions regarding the intergovernmental process to define the modalities for the post-2015 Summit, with a focus on elements pertaining to civil society participation.
1) The co-facilitators of the intergovernmental consultations on these modalities, H. E. Mr. Ib Petersen of Denmark and H. E. Mr. Robert  Aisi of Papua New Guinea, along with senior UN Secretariat colleagues supporting the planning for the Summit, invite civil society representatives to a meeting this Wednesday, 18 June, from 8:00-9:00am NY time, in Room S-2726/2727FC on the 27th floor of the Secretariat Building at UN Headquarters. 
If you are in NY and possess a UN grounds pass, you may attend in person, and must RSVP to Ms. Melody Cruz via e-mail at cruz@un.org
If you are outside of NY, you may dial in to listen to the meeting. Instructions are below. 
UN-NGLS will also release a summary. 
To dial in to the 18 June meeting, at 8:00am NY time:
You will be greeted with a Welcome prompt.
Enter the Meeting ID number 16871869, and then press the # key to confirm.
You will then be joined into the meeting
2) On Tuesday, 24 June, from 9:00-10:00am NY time, UN-NGLS and DESA-DSD will co-host a teleconference for civil society to discuss the process to define these modalities. 
Please RSVP for this call to info@un-ngls.org, with your name, organization, email address and telephone #.
Please indicate if you would like for us to dial out to you. We can do this for the first 20 participants that make this request.
Dial-in instructions are below. Please note the number to call is the same as the 18 June meeting, but the Meeting ID # is different.
To dial in to the 24 June teleconference, at 9:00am NY time:
You will be greeted with a Welcome prompt.
Enter the Meeting ID number 16315864, and then press the # key to confirm.
You will then be joined into the meeting
Please circulate this information widely.
Thank you and best regards,
Susan

Susan Alzner Officer in Charge, New York Office United Nations Non-Governmental Liaison Service (UN-NGLS) www.un-ngls.org NGLS on Twitter @unngls

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http://peoplesgoals.org/what-is-at-stake-for-the-people-in-the-post-2015-negotiations/

Good day!

We have a new post from our colleague at Roots for Equity Azra Talat    Sayeed. The article is titled “What is at Stake for the People in    the Post-2015 Negotiations?” http://peoplesgoals.org/what-is-at-stake-for-the-people-in-the-post-2015-negotiations/#sthash.ZQ2iiJEG.dpuf

The article argues that despite the pressing social, economic, and    environmental catastrophes confronting the world today, analyses of    recent trends in the post-2015 debate the revival of the “spirit of    Globalizaton” and the private sector capture of the global    development agenda. Policies like Public-Private Partnerships, Green    Economy seem to offer alternatives, but in truth, will only lead to    the greater concentration of wealth into the hands of corporations    and the elite. We are poised to repeat the same fatal errors of the    past if these discourses are left unchallenged.

What is at        Stake for the People in the Post-2015 Negotiations? 

Azra Talat        Sayeed, Roots for Equity 

Presented at        the Workshop on Development Justice, (Campaign for Peoples Goals        for Sustainable Development, APWLD), Asia Pacific Feminist        Forum, Chaing Mai, Thailand, 31 May, 2014 

Decades          of Crisis

The past couple of decades has shown us that the Earth and      its inhabitants have been slapped by one crises after another.      These include the economic crises, the energy crises, the food      crises and worst the climate crises. No doubt, the multiple crises      facing the people and the Earth are a result of the exploitative      mechanisms entrenched in the capitalist production system. It      needs to be also emphasized that the industrial mechanized form of      production that is the heart of capitalism is entirely dependent      on fossil fuels: no doubt the wreckage of the Earth’s ecological      systems are a result of the constant expulsion of carbon gases      from fossil fuels.

The capitalist system suffering from over production, and      decreasing profit margins has gone into a panic mode and the      result have been on one hand the brutal implementation of      neoliberal policies and on the other, the wars being carried out      by imperialist forces to ensure their control over the natural      resources, markets and labour movements across the globe.

Manifestations 

The manifestation of the neoliberal policies is the intense      militarization of local communities, nations and regions. The      globalization era has been marked by the presence of military and      para-military forces of our own nations guarding the interest of      the international corporations. In addition, there has been      occupation of countries such as Iraq and Afghanistan for control      over a key natural resource: oil.

The result have been atrocious human right abuses, with all      sectors of small producers being pushed out of their communities,      losing control over their productive resources and livelihoods.      Murder and plunder of the communities is now a routine facing the      most marginalized across the globe. They suffer from malnutrition      and hunger; the indignity of being without decent work forced into      migration and many new forms of bondage.

The steep rise in prices of energy sources, food, housing      and transportation has resulted in stark inequalities among the      people. The Occupy Movement emphasized the marginalization of the      99%, with the global elite being just 1%. No doubt, women whether      they are factory workers, domestic workers, migrant workers,      peasants, fisher women are the worst off. The violence faced by      women has increased manifold. Both state and non-state actors are      responsible for the brutal violence faced by women. The forced      implementation of privatization, deregulation and liberalization      policies has resulted in the intense increase in violence faced by      women at home, in the communities and their work places.

Sustainable          Development Framework

It is at this critical point in history, there is this      unique collective opportunity for both our governments and the      people to engage in the new framework of development that is being      envisioned under the Post 2015. The Millennium Development Goals      (MDGs) that had been developed by governments with specific goals      and targets for national development were for the 2000-2015 time      period. Currently, governments from the developed and developing      nations are engaged in negotiating for a new development      framework, popularly known as the Sustainable Development Goals      (SDGs) or Post-2015.

Privatization          of Sustainable Development Goals

Given the multitude and scale of the crises facing      humanity, it would have seemed that the multilateral negotiations      would have focused on implementing immediate, holistic measures      that would bring about a transformative structural change in      addressing rising tragic inequalities within and among nations and      the fragile ecological balance; Instead, the spirit of the      Globalization agenda continues to be implemented. Indeed, the      Post-2015 negotiations are now considered to be the privatization      of development.

The strong brutal push towards implementation has been      obvious through the many policy documents that have been put      forward by the OECD.  An important document brought out by the      OECD in 2006, namely “Pro-Poor Growth”, clearly places the private      sector as a critical contributor to economic growth and employment      creation. This is the pattern that has been followed by all      Northern governments pushing a private sector development      strategy. For example, the final document that came as a result of      the Fourth High Level Forum for Aid, December, 2011, South Korea.      The Busan Partnership for Effective Development has acknowledged      the central role of the private sector in innovation, creating      wealth and contributing to poverty reduction.

The Private Sector which basically means the transnational      corporations that have been responsible for the plunder of the      Earth’s natural resources and massive exploitation and oppression      of the people are now being projected as those who will play a key      role in alleviating poverty as well as saviors from the debacle      facing the planet Earth.

The Development framework has made the private sector role      central to delivering all programs may they be related to the      energy, agriculture, transport, or any other sector. The Public      Private Partnership (PPP) is the model that is being pushed at the      people to be used for implementing so called development programs,      projects and schemes. The PPP basically means that the private      sector will sell all goods and services to the communities. The      government infrastructure or other services are used for delivery      of a service: but the price of the service is now based on profit      motive of the private sector. Poor marginalized communities are      forced to access services at a much higher price than they could      afford. The result is the poorest suffer further marginalization.      The private sector is able to expand its market mechanism in      communities. At the same time, governments back off from      delivering basic services to the people.

Following the privatization of development a favorite      method for working with communities, particularly women are      microfinance programs. There is now plenty of evidence to show      that loans given to women come with high interest rates and      increase their indebtedness as they will borrow from various      sources in order to keep paying the exorbitant monthly interest.

Green Economy, a key new term for development is now being      introduced and promoted. It addresses urban and rural development,      emphasizing renewable sources of energy. Green Economy has      introduced a whole range of new technologies that will in essence      replace all fossil fuel based technologies. Thus whether it be      energy, transport or agriculture an entirely new range of      technologies is being offered. For instance, in the agriculture      sector, climate smart genetically modified seeds, biogas,      aeroponics and hydroponics for food production all are based on      the Green Economy model. Green energy using renewable energy that      include windmills, solar panels, and agro-fuels is the back bone      of Green Economy.  These technologies in themselves are still not      entirely independent of fossil fuel. In addition, they all will      now be exploiting natural resources on a very large scale; no      doubt, creating further havoc on the ecological systems, globally.       All biomass that is an intrinsic part of the subsistence living      of rural communities is being eyed as a source of renewable      energies. An example is of animal manure: rural communities all      over the third world use animal manure widely for a whole range of      services. For instance, women will make small patties out of      animal manure to be used as household cooking fuel. It is also      used as a major source of increasing soil fertility in agriculture      production. This age old practice is now being used by the      business sector by installing biogas plants using the biomass      available in rural communities. Many microfinance schemes are      being promoted which provide biogas to communities as kitchen      fuel. All of this is to be sold at a price. These were already      being used by women as a good provided by nature free of cost. A      simple example is of an old woman living with a young woman      suffering from psychiatric disorder. Both were unable to collect      wood to be used for fuel for their kitchen use. So they bought a      calf. The sole purpose of the young animal was to collect its      manure and use it as fuel.

Further, it must be emphasized that these technologies will      not be shared for the good of humanity. On the other hand, they      will be sold at high profit rates. All technologies are protected      under intellectual property rights owned by the mega-corporations      of the North. In fact, the Green Economy model is in considered to      be a method designed to bring out the North from the acute      economic crisis that it is currently facing. The whole range of      products being offered under the Green Economy are geared to      extract further profits for the transnational corporations through      the payments and huge royalties for these new technologies. The      formula being provided for development through Green Economy is no      more than the old cycle of debt ad poverty faced by the people of      the third world economies and is to be further exacerbated. The      Green Economy is clearly still based in the neoliberal framework      of capitalist production system based on extracting profits by      exploiting labor and natural resources.

In addition, a dangerous emphasis of Green Economy is the      commodification of ecological services; which are the many      services performed by nature that allow humanity to survive. These      include food and seed production, pollination, land conservation      and many others. There is now a strong push to quantify the types      of ecological services provided by nature and to put a price to      these services.

Positioning          of the Third World Governments

Given the thrust of the privatization by Northern      governments, how are our governments, who represent the two-third      of the world’s humanity, responding?

The response can only be termed as disappointing which      falls very short of bringing about a transformative change to      redress the imperialist policies and nullify the acute      inequalities that sharply plunges a very vast majority of the      people into debt, hunger and poverty

The G77 nations and China are using the “Future We Want”       document as the basis for their negotiations. This document was      the result of the Rio+20 conference held in June, 2012 in Brazil.      Though, ‘Future We Want’ does acknowledge various human rights      including women, rights and the right to food, it is still a      document which also fails to repudiate the Intellectual Property      Rights as spelled out by the TRIPS agreement of the WTO. And it      provides no clarity on the institutional framework that is needed      for the implementation of the Post-2015 agenda. Therefore, the use      of development tools and mechanisms such as capacity building and      transfer of technology should be critically assessed for their      real worth: these are mechanisms which will be used to sell very      expensive technologies at high royalties. No doubt, then northern      consultants will provide trainings and know-how to the southern      governments also at premium consultancy fees.

Another area where third world governments have as yet      failed to negotiate clear terms is for “Common but Differential      Responsibilities.” Though Third World governments have affirmed      CBDR there is still a need to demand a clear target setting for      the responsibilities of first world nations as is the basic      context of the Principle 7 of the Rio Principles commonly known as      the ‘Common but Differentiated Responsibilities’ (CBDR).

The context of CBDR is that the acute destruction faced      from climate change has a historical background. Climate change is      a result of the industrial development pathway followed by the      developed world that has resulted in huge carbon emissions and      resulting global warming. Hence, no doubt the responsibility of      restoring some ecological balance falls on all those inhabit this      world but the developed world has a primary responsibility and      obligation to provide clear targets and timelines for not only      decreasing emissions at a higher and faster rate than the third      world, but also to provide progressive policies which allow for a      just development. Some demands that have been articulated by      People’s Campaigns for development justice include elimination of      tax havens, reform of trade and investment rules to protect and      promote local production and employment, especially of small      producers.

In addition, with respect to means of implementation (MOI)      there is no clarity and lacks direction. MOI is the basic      framework that will detail the means and methods of accomplishing      and implementing the negotiated sustainable development goals.      They cover interdependent areas such as financial resources,      technology transfer, capacity building as well as a national      enabling environment required to implement the new sustainable      development framework. 

Peoples          Position 

The weak positioning of our governments is clear. The      negotiations for sustainable development goals will provide the      development framework for the next 15 years. The globalization      era, the beginning of which was marked by the lethal      implementation of the neoliberal policies in the 1980s has pushed      the Earth and the people towards ongoing multiple crises as has      been discussed above.

The Northern governments push for further liberalization      and privatization is clear. Given that our governments have not      taken any clear steps to change the direction of the path taken by      the North, it is clear that the people will have to take proactive      and multi-pronged methods of engagement.

It is also critical that all segments of civil society are      a part of the people’s campaigns. The media, academia, health care      professionals, lawyers among others are all part of our      communities and are needed to build a peoples movement to ensure      that a truly just model of development is eked for the coming      decades.

And of course, there can be no people’s movement without      the masses. All small producers including the fisher folk,      peasants, small and landless farmers, pastoralists, women,      indigenous people, minorities, as well as women and youth need to      be key   players demanding for development justice. The example of      two women given above, seemingly helpless and dependent on others,      show clearly that people know how to look after themselves, and      make decisions which will provide long term solutions to their      issues.  There is no way forward for the people that  does not      include not only our voices but our central role in decision      making and implementation.

See more at: http://peoplesgoals.org/what-is-at-stake-for-the-people-in-the-post-2015-negotiations/#sthash.ZQ2iiJEG.dpuf

 

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Link to Ong Ngo

Ong Ngo (IFP) – EN

Advocacy toolkit on the Post-2015 development agenda

 

Share a new advocacy toolkit on the Post-2015 development agenda that the IFP created jointly with CIVICUS and Stakeholder Forum. This toolkit is for civil society and other stakeholder organisations, coalitions and individuals that wish to influence the Post-2015 development agenda, including the design and implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The toolkit aims to equip you…

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Advocacy Toolkit: Influencin​g the post-2015 developmen​t agenda

 

 This toolkit  ****   is for civil society and other stakeholder organisations, coalitions and individuals that wish to influence the post-2015 development agenda, including the design of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It aims to equip you with relevant information and tools to enable you to develop and implement an effective post-2015 advocacy strategy. You can either follow its step-by-step approach or simply consult the tips, tools and case studies most relevant to your existing activities.

                               Toolkit (1) Post2015AdvocacyToolkit

 

The advocacy toolkit is divided into two parts:
Part 1: The Post-2015 Development Agenda: What Is It and How Can You Engage?
Provides a full background on the post-2015 processes and identifies key entry points for engagement and influence.

 

Part 2: Developing a Post-2015 Advocacy Strategy
Guides you through the necessary steps for developing your own post-2015 advocacy strategy, building on the information and opportunities identified in Part 1.


Toolkit (2) Post2015ToolkitEngagingwiththemedia

A companion to the toolkit, ‘Engaging with the Media‘ provides a guide to the strategic use of the media and social media in the context of post-2015 advocacy.  

The media guide provides advice and guidance on how to target your messages for broadcast, press and social media; identify and build relationships with journalists; conduct interviews and hold press conferences, in order to deliver your post-2015 advocacy messages to a wider audience.

Both guides provide ready-made tools, templates, case studies and top tips for each stage of your post-2015 advocacy work. They support activities at the national, regional and international levels and cater for all levels of experience in the post-2015 development agenda and in advocacy and media work. Whether you follow each tool and step in turn as a newcomer to the agenda, or only consult those new or relevant to you in order to support a more established programme, we hope they will prove useful to all.

An interactive, online version of the advocacy toolkit will be made available by June, along with translations of all content into French, Spanish and Portuguese.

New audiovisual content, updates and analysis will also be provided online, so keep checking www.SD2015.org for more details.

Download the Advocacy Toolkit here.

Download ‘Engaging with the Media’ here.

Further information:
Contact: 2015info@stakeholderforum.org / post2015@civicus.org

The SD2015 Programme
This report is an output of the Sustainable Development 2015 (SD2015) programme, a multi-stakeholder engagement programme run by Stakeholder Forum and CIVICUS, in collaboration with UNDESA.

See www.SD2015.org for more information and resources.

 

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Fwd: URGENT letter to Open Working Group — please endorse (EN, FR and RU — SP forthcomin​g) (support before June 12)

 

From: Mary Ann Torres <MaryAnnT@icaso.org> Date: 2014-06-10 0:09 GMT-04:00 Subject: URGENT letter to Open Working Group — please endorse (EN, FR and RU — SP forthcoming) (support before June 12) To:

BEFORE June 12, 2014

18h00 EST

 

Please send endorsement to Post2015MDG@Icaso.org

Pour endosser la lettre, envoyer un courriel à: Post2015MDG@Icaso.org

Для одобрения, отправьте сообщение по адресу: Post2015MDG@Icaso.org

Por favor envíe su apoyo a: Post2015MDG@Icaso.org

 

 

Response to the June 2nd Open Working Group’s introduction and proposed goals and targets on sustainable development for the post-2015 development agenda

On behalf of a coalition of civil society organisations delivering programmes and advocacy on health priorities, including HIV, sexual and reproductive health,  and youth living with and vulnerable to HIV.

 

1.   Target 3.3 “end HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases needs to be strengthened through adding “by guaranteeing equitable, universal and affordable access to prevention, treatment, care and support for all people across the life course, with a particular focus on adolescents and young people”. It also needs to include disease-specific sub-targets and indicators including on HIV/AIDS such as reducing new HIV infections, discrimination and AIDS-related deaths to 10% of 2010 levels as recommended by UNAIDS. These sub-targets should be disaggregated to measure inequalities in achieving these targets for people that experience stigma, discrimination, criminalization and exclusion.  These include men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who use drugs and transgender people. These populations experience high levels of HIV incidence in virtually every country, yet are often excluded from HIV prevention, treatment and care services, sexual and reproductive health services and from accessing the public health system overall.

 

2.      We welcome the Open Working Group’s formulation of the health goal “attain healthy life for all at all ages.” Target 3.4 is too broad and incoherent as it includes too many issues that are unrelated and the formulation of the target makes it impossible to measure. We recommend including the non-communicable diseases and mental health and wellbeing under target 3.6 on universal health coverage instead. It is obvious that universal health coverage should also deliver on communicable diseases as well as address the social determinants of health. Target 3.4 should read as follows:  reduce by x% the burden of health harm and premature death associated with unhealthy foods and alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. The language proposed by the Open Working Group “strengthen prevention and treatment of narcotic drug and substance abuse” could result into an interpretation that does not allow for effective interventions to treat opiate dependency, namely opiate substitution treatment, which is recommended in many WHO guidelines.

 

3.      We are pleased to the inclusion of “particular attention to the most marginalized and people in vulnerable situations” in target 3.6. Governments must ensure that no one will be left behind and specifically seek to remove measures that pose barriers for marginalized, vulnerable groups to access health services and that stigmatize and criminalize people on the basis of HIV status, sexual orientation, gender identity, engagement in sex work and drug use. We further recognize that the needs of adolescents and young people, as the stewards of this next development agenda, must be integrated across all dimensions of sustainable development.

 

4.   Target 3.8 “ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health for all” should be changed into: “ensure universal access to high-quality, comprehensive, equitable and integrated sexual and reproductive health services, information and education, and respect, protect and fulfill all human rights in this regard  with a particular focus on young people, adolescents, and other marginalized as well as criminalized groups.

 

5.    Proposed goal 4 on education must include an additional target addressing universal access to comprehensive sexuality education that promotes respect for human rights, tolerance, gender equality and non-violence for all in and out of school youth or amend 4.7 as follows: “By 2030 integrate relevant knowledge and skills in education curricula and training programs, including comprehensive sexuality education, life skills, education for sustainable development, and human rights education.

 

6.   Target 5.9 must be strengthened as follows:  “By 2030 ensure sexual and reproductive health and rights free from stigma, violence, coercion and discrimination for all women and girls of all ages

 

7.   We applaud the Open Working Group’s proposal for a stand-alone goal to reduce inequality within and among countries (Proposed goal 10) and in particular to reduce inequality among social groups within countries. Target 10.1 on eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices needs to be further specified to ensure that people from all social groups, including marginalized, criminalized and stigmatized people have the right to an effective remedy to injustice, including related to human rights and gender equality, and that all barriers to the full realization of human rights are eradicated. Target 10.7 to ensure the availability of high-quality, timely and disaggregated data to ensure monitoring of progress for marginalized groups and people in vulnerable situations is crucial. This should apply to all marginalized groups, and data should be collected in a way that respects confidentiality and fully protects the human rights of these groups, in particular groups that are stigmatized and criminalized in the majority of countries, including men who have sex with men, people who use drugs, sex workers and transgender persons.

 

8.   Under Proposed goal 17 on strengthening and enhancing the means of implementation and global partnership for sustainable development, we urge the Open Working Group to include a target on domestic resource mobilization applicable to all countries, including by implementing a progressive tax system, improving tax collection and the efficiency of public spending, reducing tax evasion and avoidance, improving stolen asset recovery, and strengthening systems to harness domestic savings for investment. In addition, there needs to be a target to support the implementation of global and national innovative financing mechanisms including financial transaction taxes, air ticket levies and other innovative financing tools as a complementary source of public revenue that provides predicable finance flows targeted towards health and other post-2015 goals.

 

9.   Target 17.4 on directing ODA and encourage financial flows to states where the need is greatest, in particular African countries, LDCs, SIDSs, LLCDs, and vulnerable states needs to reflect the fact that the majority of poor people live in middle income countries and by 2030, the majority of people living with HIV will live in middle income countries. This will require dedicated ongoing financial assistance, both domestic and external to ensure that the poorest and most marginalized people in middle income countries are not left behind.

 

10.  The meaningful engagement of civil society, including those most marginalized and young people and people living with and affected by HIV, in the development, implementation and monitoring of the post-2015 goals, targets and indicators is crucial. This is true both for the needs of people to be more effectively addressed and for duty-bearers such as national governments and donors to be held accountable. The crucial role of civil society goes beyond being subcontractors and implementing partners. Civil society should be strengthened and empowered as service providers, advocates, and equal development partners to shape their own future.

 

11.  We welcome target 17.11 on supporting research and development of vaccines and medicines for communicable diseases, however it should be amended to say: “fully support research and development of vaccines, medicines and other health technologies for the communicable diseases that affect both developing countries as well as marginalized populations and people in vulnerable situations globally, including by using the flexibilities agreed in the DOHA Round for transferring technology for lowering costs of medicine production.

 

12.  Target 17.13 on the recruitment, development, training and retention of the health work force must include a specific reference to the strengthening of the community health workforce as part of the overall health workforce. Community-delivered health care and services, in particular to the poorest, most marginalized, criminalized and stigmatized people, have been crucial for an effective HIV/AIDS response. Community systems strengthening as part of overall health systems strengthening is outlined in the Community Systems Strengthening Framework of the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. 

 

 

Réponse à l’introduction et aux propositions d’objectifs et cibles du développement durable pour l’agenda de développement post-2015 du Groupe de travail ouvert en date du 2 juin 2014.

Au nom d’une coalition d’organisations de la société civile actives dans les programmes et le plaidoyer sur les priorités en matière de santé, y compris le VIH, la santé sexuelle et reproductive, et les jeunes vivant avec ou vulnérables au VIH. 

 

1.      La cible 3.3 “mettre fin au VIH / SIDA, à la tuberculose, au paludisme et aux maladies tropicales négligées doit être renforcée par l’ajout de “en garantissant l’accès équitable, universel et abordable à la prévention, au traitement, aux soins et au soutien pour toutes les personnes à travers le cours de la vie, avec un un accent particulier sur les adolescents et les jeunes“. Elle doit également inclure des sous-cibles et des indicateurs spécifiques aux maladies, y compris sur le VIH / SIDA, tels que la réduction des nouvelles infections au VIH, des discrimination et des décès liés au SIDA à 10% des niveaux de 2010, tel que recommandé par l’ONUSIDA. Ces sous-cibles doivent être ventilées pour mesurer les inégalités dans la réalisation de ces cibles pour les personnes qui subissent la stigmatisation, la discrimination, la criminalisation et l’exclusion. Il s’agit notamment des hommes ayant des rapports sexuels avec des hommes, des travailleurs du sexe, des usagers de drogues et des personnes transgenres. Ces populations connaissent des niveaux élevés d’incidence du VIH dans presque tous les pays, mais sont souvent exclues des services de prévention, de traitement et des soins du VIH, des services de santé reproductive et sexuelle et de l”accès au système de santé publique en général.

 

2.      Nous nous félicitons de la formulation de l’objectif de santé du Groupe de travail ouvert “atteindre une vie saine pour tous à tous les âges.” La cible 3.4 est toutefois trop large et incohérente car elle comprend trop de priorités sans rapport les unes aux autres et que la formulation de la cible ne permet pas de mesurer. Nous recommandons plutôt d’inclure les maladies non transmissibles et la santé mentale et le bien-être sous la cible 3.6 sur la couverture santé universelle. Il est évident que la couverture santé universelle doit également répondre aux maladies transmissibles ainsi qu’aux déterminants sociaux de la santé. La cible 3.4 devrait se lire comme suit: réduire de x% l’incidence des dommages sur la santé et des décès prématurés associés aux aliments malsains, à l’alcool, au tabac et autres drogues. Le libellé proposé par le Groupe de travail ouvert “renforcer la prévention et le traitement des abus de stupéfiants et de substances” pourrait entraîner une interprétation qui ne permette pas d’interventions efficaces pour traiter la dépendance aux opiacés, notamment le traitement de substitution auc opiacés, qui est recommandé dans de nombreuses directives de l’OMS.

 

3.      Nous sommes heureux de l’inclusion de “une attention particulière aux personnes les plus marginalisées et en situations vulnérables” dans la cible 3.6. Les gouvernements doivent veiller à ce que personne ne soit laissé pour compte et demander spécifiquement à supprimer les mesures qui constituent des obstacles pour les groupes marginalisés et vulnérables dans l’accès aux services de santé et qui stigmatisent et criminalisent les gens sur base du statut VIH, l’orientation sexuelle, l’identité sexuelle, l’engagement dans le travail du sexe et la consommation de drogues. Nous reconnaissons en outre que les besoins des adolescents et des jeunes, comme les gardiens du nouvel agenda de développement, doivent être intégrés dans toutes les dimensions du développement durable.

 

4.      La cible 3.8 “assurer l’accès universel à la santé sexuelle et reproductive pour tous” devrait être changée en: “assurer l’accès universel à des services, une informatin et une éducation de santé sexuelle et reproductive qualitatifs, équitables et intégrés, et respecter, protéger et remplir tous les droits de l’homme à cet égard avec un accent particulier sur les jeunes, les adolescents et autres groupes marginalisés ainsi que les groupes criminalisés ».

 

5.      La proposition d’objectif 4 sur l’éducation doit inclure une cible supplémentaire concernant l’accès universel à une éducation sexuelle exhaustive qui favorise le respect des droits de l’homme, la tolérance, l’égalité des sexes et la non-violence pour tous dans et hors de l’école ou modifier 4.7 comme suit: “Avant 2030, intègrer les connaissances et les compétences nécessaires dans les programmes d’éducation et de formation, y compris l’éducation exhaustive de la sexualité, des compétences de vie, l’éducation au développement durable, et l’éducation aux droits de l’homme.”

 

6.      La cible 5.9 doit être renforcée comme suit: “Avant 2030, assurer la santé et les droits sexuels et reproductifs libres de stigmatisation, de violence, de coercition et de discrimination pour toutes les femmes et les filles de tous âges.”

 

7.      Nous saluons la proposition du Groupe de travail ouvert pour un objectif autonome de réduction des inégalités dans et entre les pays (objectif proposé 10) et en particulier à réduire les inégalités entre les groupes sociaux au sein des pays. La cible 10.1 sur l’élimination des lois, politiques et pratiques discriminatoires doit être davantage préciséeafin de veiller à ce que les gens de tous les groupes sociaux, y compris les personnes marginalisées, criminalisées et stigmatisées ont droit à un recours effectif à l’injustice, y compris en rapport avec les droits humains et l’égalité des sexes, et que tous les obstacles à la pleine réalisation des droits de l’homme soiet éradiqués. La cible 10.7 visant à assurer la disponibilité de données ventilées, de haute qualité et en temps opportun pour assurer le suivi des progrès pour les groupes marginalisés et les personnes en situation de vulnérabilité est essentielle. Cela devrait s’appliquer à tous les groupes marginalisés, et les données devraient être recueillies d’une manière qui respecte la confidentialité et protège les droits de l’homme de ces groupes, en particulier les groupes qui sont stigmatisés et criminalisés dans la majorité des pays, y compris les hommes ayant des rapports sexuels avec des hommes, les personnes qui utilisent des drogues, les travailleurs du sexe et les personnes transgenres.

 

8.      Sous objectif proposé 17 sur le renforcement et l’amélioration des moyens de mise en œuvre et du partenariat mondial pour le développement durable, nous demandons instamment au Groupe de travail d’nclure une cible sur la mobilisation des ressources nationales applicable à tous les pays, y compris par la mise en œuvre d’un système d’impôt progressif, l’amélioration de la collecte de l’impôt et de l’efficacité des dépenses publiques, en réduisant l’évasion et l’évitement fiscaux, l’amélioration du recouvrement d’avoirs volés, et le renforcement des systèmes d’épargne intérieure pour l’investissement. En outre, il doit y avoir une cible de soutien à la mise en œuvre de mécanismes de financement novateurs mondiaux et nationaux y compris les taxes sur les transactions financières, les prélèvements sur les billets d’avion et d’autres outils de financement novateurs, comme sources de revenus publics complémentaires qui fournissent des flux de financement prévisibles pour la santé et d’autres objectifs post-2015.

 

9.      La cible de 17.4 visant à diriger l’APD et d’encourager les flux financiers vers les pays où le besoin est le plus grand, en particulier les pays africains, les PMA, les PEID, et les États vulnérables doit tenir compte du fait que la majorité des pauvres vivent dans les pays à revenu intermédiaire et qu’en 2030, la majorité des personnes vivant avec le VIH vivront dans des pays à revenu intermédiaire. Cela nécessitera une aide financière permanente, à la fois interne et externe afin de s’assurer que les personnes les plus pauvres et les plus marginalisées dans les pays à revenu intermédiaire ne soient pas laissées pour compte.

 

10.  L’engagement significatif de la société civile, y compris des plus marginalisés, des jeunes et des personnes vivant avec et affectées par le VIH, dans le développement, la mise en œuvre et le suivi des objectifs, cibles et indicateurs post-2015 est crucial. Cela est vrai tant pour le traitement efficace ds besoins de la population que pour la redevance res porteurs d’obligations tels que les gouvernements nationaux et les donateurs. Le rôle crucial de la société civile va au-delà de celui de sous-traitants et de partenaires d’exécution. La société civile doit être renforcée en tant que fournisseur de services, avocat et des partenaire de développement égal de manière à façonner son propre avenir.

 

11.  Nous nous félicitons de la cible 17.11 visant à soutenir la recherche et le développement de vaccins et de médicaments pour les maladies transmissibles, mais elle evrait être modifiée comme suit: “soutenir pleinement la recherche et le développement de vaccins, de médicaments et d’autres technologies sanitaires pour les maladies transmissibles qui affectent les pays en développement ainsi que les populations marginalisées et les personnes en situation de vulnérabilité à l’échelle mondiale, y compris en utilisant les facilités convenues dans le cycle de Doha pour le transfert de technologie pour la réduction des coûts de production des médecaments.

 

12.  La cible 17.13 sur le recrutement, le développement, la formation et la rétention du personnel sanitaire doit inclure une référence spécifique au renforcement du personnel de santé communautaire dans le cadre de la main-d’oeuvre globale sanitaire. Les soins et services communautaires, en particulier envers les plus pauvres et les personnes les plus marginalisées, criminalisées et stigmatisées, ont joué un rôle crucial pour une réponse efficace au VIH / SIDA. Le renforcement des systèmes communautaires dans le cadre global du renforcement des systèmes de santé est décrit dans le Cadre derenforcement des systèmes communautaires du Fonds mondial de lutte contre le SIDA, la tuberculose et le paludisme.

 

Ответ на представленные на заседании Открытой рабочей группы (2 июня)                                       

предлагаемые цели и показатели устойчивого развития в рамках повестки дня в области развития на период после 2015 года

От имени коалиции организаций гражданского общества, осуществляющих программы и адвокацию по вопросам охраны здоровья, включая ВИЧ-инфекцию, сексуальное и репродуктивное здоровье, а также проблемы молодежи, живущей с ВИЧ и уязвимой к ВИЧ-инфекции.

 

13.           Цель 3.3 «Остановить ВИЧ/СПИД, туберкулез, малярию и игнорируемые тропические заболевания» необходимо усилить, добавив следующие слова «обеспечив гарантии равного, всеобщего и недорогого доступа к профилактике, лечению, уходу и поддержке для всех людей в течение всей жизни, с особым вниманием к подросткам и молодежи». Эта цель также должна включать второстепенные цели и показатели, связанные с конкретными заболеваниями, в том числе с ВИЧ/СПИДом, например, снижение числа новых случаев ВИЧ-инфекции, дискриминации и смертельных случаев в связи со СПИДом до 10% от уровня 2010 года, в соответствии с рекомендациями ЮНЭЙДС. Эти второстепенные цели необходимо разукрупнить, чтобы измерить уровень неравенства в достижении этих целей для людей, испытывающих стигму, дискриминацию, криминализацию и изоляцию. В эти группы населения входят мужчины, имеющие сексуальные отношения с мужчинами, секс-работники, люди, употребляющие наркотики, и трансгендеры. Эти группы населения сталкиваются с высоким уровнем заболеваемости ВИЧ-инфекции практически во всех странах, но зачастую их исключают из программ профилактики, лечения и ухода в связи с ВИЧ-инфекцией, программ поддержки сексуального и репродуктивного здоровья, а также лишают доступа к системе общественного здравоохранения в целом.

 

14.  Мы приветствуем то, что Открытая рабочая группа сформулировала цель по здоровью «добиться здоровья для всех и в любом возрасте». Однако цель 3.4 сформулирована слишком общими словами и нечетко, потому что ее формулировка включает слишком много вопросов, не связанных между собой, а измерить достижение этой цели не представляется возможным. Вместо этого мы рекомендуем включить проблемы неинфекционных заболеваний, психического здоровья и благополучия в формулировку цели 3.6, посвященной всеобщему охвату программ здравоохранения. Очевидно, что всеобщий охват программ здравоохранения должен включать инфекционные заболевания, а также социальные детерминанты здоровья. Цель 3.4 должна быть сформулирована следующим образом: снизить на x% бремя вреда для здоровья и преждевременной смертности в связи с нездоровой пищей и алкоголем, табачными изделиями и другими наркотиками. Использование формулировки, предложенной Открытой рабочей группой – «усилить профилактику и лечение злоупотреблений наркотическими средствами и психоактивными веществами», может привести к интерпретации, не позволяющей осуществлять эффективные мероприятия по лечению опиатной зависимости, в частности программы опиоидной заместительной терапии, рекомендованной многими руководствами ВОЗ.

 

15.  Мы рады отметить включение в цель 3.6 «особого внимания к потребностям наиболее маргинализованных групп и людей, находящихся в ситуации уязвимости». Правительства должны убедиться, что никто не останется без поддержки. В особенности они должны стремиться исключить меры, создающие барьеры для доступа маргинализованных и уязвимых групп к программам охраны здоровья, а также стигматизирующие и криминализующие людей на основе их ВИЧ-статуса, сексуальной ориентации, гендерной идентичности, участия в секс-работе и употреблении наркотиков. Кроме того, мы признаем, что потребности подростков и молодежи, направляющие эту повестку дня, необходимо интегрировать во все измерения устойчивого развития.

16.           Формулировку цели 3.8 «обеспечить всеобщий доступ к программам защиты сексуального и репродуктивного здоровья для всех» необходимо изменить на «обеспечить всеобщий доступ к высококачественным, комплексным, равнодоступным интегрированным программам защиты сексуального и репродуктивного здоровья, информации и образования, а также уважать, защищать и соблюдать все права человека в этой области, уделяя особое внимание молодежи, подросткам и другим маргинализованным и криминализованным группам».

 

17.Предложенная цель 4, посвященная образованию, должна включать дополнительную цель, посвященную всеобщему доступу к комплексному сексуальному образованию, способствующему уважению прав человека, толерантности, гендерному равенству и отказу от насилия для всей молодежи в учебных заведениях или вне их. Другой вариант – изменить формулировку цели 4.7 следующим образом: «К 2030 году интегрировать соответствующие знания и навыки в сфере образовательных программ и образования, включая комплексное сексуальное образование, а также обучение жизненным навыкам и образование в сфере устойчивого развития и прав человека.

 

18.           Цель 5.9 необходимо усилить следующим образом: «К 2030 году обеспечить защиту сексуального и репродуктивного здоровья и прав, свободу от стигмы, насилия, принуждения и дискриминации для всех женщин и девушек любого возраста.

 

19.           Мы приветствуем предложение Открытой рабочей группы разработать отдельную цель сокращения неравенства внутри стран и между ними (предложенная цель 10) и, в частности, сокращения неравенства среди социальных групп внутри стран. Необходимо дополнительно уточнить формулировку цели 10.1, посвященной ликвидации дискриминационных законов, стратегий и практики, чтобы обеспечить право на эффективное решение проблемы несправедливости, включая несправедливость в контексте прав человека и гендерного равенства, для всех социальных групп, включая маргинализованные, криминализованные и стигматизированные группы, а также ликвидацию всех барьеров к соблюдению прав человека. Также важна цель 10.7, посвященная обеспечению доступности высококачественных, своевременных и разукрупненных данных для мониторинга успеха в деле защиты интересов маргинализованных групп и людей, находящихся в ситуации уязвимости. Это должно относиться ко всем уязвимым группам. Сбор данных необходимо осуществлять таким образом, чтобы соблюдать конфиденциальность и защищать права представителей этих групп – в особенности групп, стигматизированных и маргинализованных в большинстве стран, включая мужчин, имеющих сексуальные отношения с мужчинами, людей, употребляющих наркотики, секс-работников и трансгендеров.

 

20.           В рамках предложенной цели 17, посвященной усилению и совершенствованию методов реализации целей и глобальному партнерству в целях устойчивого развития, мы призываем Открытую рабочую группу включить в список цель, посвященную мобилизации национальных ресурсов, применимую во всех странах. Эта цель должна быть реализована, в том числе, путем осуществления прогрессивной системы налогообложения, совершенствования сбора налогов и эффективной бюджетной политики, снижения числа случаев уклонения от налогов, улучшения возврата похищенных ценностей и укрепления систем, способствующих национальным инвестициям. Кроме того, необходимо включить в список цель, обеспечивающую поддержку применения глобальных и национальных инновационных финансовых механизмов, включая налоги на финансовые операции, сборы с продажи авиабилетов и другие инновационные финансовые инструменты, в качестве дополнительного источника доходов, позволяющего обеспечить предсказуемое финансирование достижения целей в области здоровья и других целей на период после 2015 года.

 

21.  Формулировка цели 17.4, посвященной направлению официальной помощи в области развития (и соответствующих финансовых потоков) в страны, имеющие наибольшую потребность в помощи, в особенности в африканские страны, наименее развитые страны, малые островные развивающиеся государства, развивающиеся страны, не имеющие выхода к морю, и уязвимые государства, должна отражать тот факт, что большинство малоимущих жителей Земли проживают в странах со средним уровнем дохода, и что к 2030 году большинство людей с ВИЧ будут жить в странах со средним уровнем дохода. Это потребует специальной постоянной финансовой поддержки из национальных и международных источников с целью обеспечить соблюдение интересов наиболее бедных и маргинализованных групп в странах со средним уровнем дохода.

 

22.  Необходимо обеспечить значимое участие гражданского общества, включая наиболее маргинализованные группы, молодежь и людей, живущих с ВИЧ и затронутых ВИЧ-инфекцией, в разработке, осуществлении и мониторинге целей развития на период после 2015 года, включая соответствующие целевые показатели и индикаторы. Это относится как к более эффективному удовлетворению потребностей людей, так и к обеспечению подотчетности со стороны ответственных за выполнение целей, включая национальные правительства и доноров. Гражданское общество играет в этом процессе важную роль, которая не ограничивается выполнением контрактов и участием в осуществлении программ. Гражданское общество необходимо укреплять, создавая возможности для участия организаций гражданского общества в качестве исполнителей программ, защитников интересов уязвимых групп и равноправных партнеров по развитию, которым необходимо самостоятельно формировать свое будущее.

 

23.  Мы приветствуем цель 17.11, посвященную поддержке исследований и разработки вакцин и лекарств для противодействия инфекционным заболеваниям, однако формулировку этой цели необходимо изменить следующим образом: «полностью поддержать исследования и разработку вакцин, лекарств и других технологий в сфере здравоохранения для противодействия инфекционным заболеваниям, затрагивающим как развивающиеся страны, так и маргинализованные группы населения и людей, находящихся в ситуации уязвимости на глобальном уровне, в том числе с использованием гибких механизмов, согласованных в рамках Дохийского раунда, в целях передачи технологий для снижения стоимости производства лекарственных средств».

 

24.  Цель 17.13, посвященная найму, развитию, обучению и удержанию работников системы здравоохранения, должна включать специальную ссылку на укрепление трудовых ресурсов для охраны здоровья сообществ в рамках общих трудовых ресурсов в сфере здравоохранения. Услуги здравоохранения на базе сообществ, особенно услуги, оказываемые наиболее бедным, маргинализованным, криминализованным и стигматизированным людям, имеют большое значение для эффективного противодействия ВИЧ/СПИДу. Укрепление систем сообществ в рамках укрепления систем здравоохранения описано в Рамочной программе укрепления систем сообществ Глобального фонда для борьбы со СПИДом, туберкулезом и малярией.

 

Mary Ann Torres    Executive Director

www.icaso.org | www.aids2014community.org  65 Wellesley St. E., Suite 403 | Toronto, ON | Canada M4Y 1G7 Mobile: +1 416 419 6338 | Office: +1 416 921 0018 ext 16 | Fax: +1 416 921 9979 Email: maryannt@icaso.org Skype: maryannicaso

Twitter: @icaso_

Gillian Dolce, MS

 

Manager
Global Youth Coalition on HIV/AIDS
155 Water Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201
GYCA is a program of the Public Health Institute

We totally agree. How do I endorse On behalf of the Voice Africa’s Future (#VAF)  program WWW.africayouth2015.org

Sincerely, Maberi Francis

Youth Coordinator and #VAF Team Leader Tel 1:+256 775 186 342 Skype ID: francis.maberi  Twitter: @maberifrancis  E1: francis.maberi@gmail.com E2: francis.maberi@ifapa-africa.org -

Inter-Faith Action for Peace in Africa – IFAPA Websit: www.ifapa-africa.org  P.O.Box 12008,GPO-P000611 Kampala, Uganda Twitter: @ifapanow

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Influencin​g the Post-2015 Developmen​t Agenda – ADVOCACY TOOLKIT

Subject: Influencing the Post-2015 Development Agenda – ADVOCACY TOOLKIT To:

Apologies for cross-posting 
From: WUNRN LISTSERVE <wunrn1@gmail.com>
WUNRN
INFLUENCING THE POST-2015 DEVELOPMENT  AGENDA – ADVOCACY TOOLKIT
Direct Link to Full 68-Page Advocacy  Toolkit:

The toolkit supports advocacy activities at the national,  regional and international levels. It does not assume a given level of  experience in either the post-2015 development agenda or in advocacy activities.  Whether you follow each section and step in turn as a newcomer to the agenda, or  only consult those new or relevant to you in order to support a more established  programme, we hope it will prove useful to all.

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF THE  TOOLKIT?

The toolkit should equip you with relevant information and  tools to enable you to develop and implement an effective post-2015 advocacy  strategy.

In particular the toolkit will help you to: 

• Understand the key post-2015 development agenda processes,  including the proposed Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the distinction  between goals, targets and indicators;

• Identify opportunities to influence the agenda at  national, regional and global levels;

• Identify key post-2015 stakeholders and decision-makers,  and their relative influence at national, regional and global levels; 

• Decide on your post-2015 advocacy priorities; 

• Develop a comprehensive action plan to influence your  government and/or relevant intergovernmental bodies; 

• Engage with the Major Groups and other key stakeholders  for mutual advocacy benefit;

• Apply the adopted post-2015 framework to your national  context and identify the national indicators to be adopted by your country; 

• Monitor and evaluate the results of your advocacy and  ultimately;

• Hold your government and others to  account to deliver their post-2015 commitments.

 WM Post 2015 Toolkit clip logo

CONTENTS

GLOSSARY 5

INTRODUCTION 6

PART 1 THE POST-2015 DEVELOPMENT AGENDA: WHAT IS IT AND HOW CAN YOU ENGAGE?  7

1. POST-2015 PROCESSES 7

1.1 INTERGOVERNMENTAL PROCESS ON SDGS 7

1.2 UN SECRETARY-GENERAL-LED POST-MDG TRACK 11

2. CONVERGENCE OF THE SDGS AND POST-MDGS TRACKS 13

3. OTHER RELEVANT INTERGOVERNMENTAL PROCESSES 14

3.1 INTERGOVERNMENTAL COMMITTEE OF EXPERTS ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT  FINANCING 14

3.2 THE HIGH LEVEL POLITICAL FORUM 15

4. OTHER CIVIL SOCIETY AND STAKEHOLDER INITIATIVES ON THE POST-2015  DEVELOPMENT AGENDA 17

PART 2 DEVELOPING A POST-2015 ADVOCACY STRATEGY 18

1. WHAT IS ADVOCACY? 18

2. WHY DEVELOP AN ADVOCACY STRATEGY? 18

3. STAKEHOLDERS’ ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 18

4. BUILDING THE FOUNDATIONS FOR SUCCESSFUL ADVOCACY

4.1 UNDERSTAND THE AGENDA: DO YOUR RESEARCH AND GATHER YOUR EVIDENCE 19

4.2 UNDERSTAND THE AGENDA FROM NATIONAL TO GLOBAL LEVEL 21

4.3 WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP 22

4.4 TIMEFRAMES 24

5. STEPS TO DEVELOP YOUR POST-2015 ADVOCACY STRATEGY 25

STEP 1: SELECT YOUR POST-2015 PRIORITIES 26

STEP 2: IDENTIFY YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE 29

STEP 3: DEVELOP YOUR MESSAGE(S) 32

STEP 4: CHOOSE YOUR MESSENGERS 35

STEP 5:

IDENTIFY OPPORTUNITIES AND ACTIVITIES FOR  DELIVERING YOUR MESSAGES 36 STEP 6: TAKE STOCK AND IDENTIFY GAPS 44

STEP 7: MANAGE RISKS 45

STEP 8: MONITOR AND EVALUATE PROGRESS AND IMPACT 48

FINAL THOUGHTS 50

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[Beyond 2015:310] News clip on Post 2015 Developmen​t Framework organized by VOICE in Dhaka recently

Dear colleagues and friend

You might feel interest to get some news update on post 2015 development framework. A national seminar has been held in Dhaka organized by VOICE. Some news clip published in English newspapers here.

Regards,

Ahmed Swapan

www.voicebd.org

  Post-MDG framework, Experts for addressing growing rich-poor gap

With the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set to expire by 2015, experts in Bangladesh have laid emphasis on addressing the growing inequality between the poor and the rich in the post-2015 framework.

The MDGs were established following the Millennium Summit of the United Nations in 2000 to achieve eight goals by 2015.

See more at: http://www.observerbd.com/details.php?id=21786#sthash.U0imBEuA.dpuf

Reduce disparity to meet MDGs, speakers say

Still most of the people are living under the extreme poverty although the target for reaching the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set for 2015

 It is a must to reduce the growing disparity between rich and poor people of the country and also among the countries as it has been appeared as a huge challenge, which needs to be addressed properly under a new framework initiated by the United Nations, speakers said at a seminar yesterday.

See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/economy/2014/may/25/reduce-disparity-meet-mdgs-speakers-say#sthash.5siismDi.dpuf

Programmes to reduce inequality sought in post-’15 dev agenda

Palli Karma-Sahayak Foundation (PKSF) Chairman Dr. Qazi Kholiquzzaman emphasised the  need for programmes in the Post 2015 Development Agenda to reduce inequality.

“The Post 2015 Development Agenda should ensure inclusive and equitable economic growth while it needs attention to reduce poverty and inequality particularly among marginalised groups and improve living conditions,” he said while speaking at a seminar.

http://www.thefinancialexpress-bd.com/2014/05/25/35863

Achieving MDGs, Thrust on concerted efforts to halve poverty Goals may not be fully met by 2015, fear analysts

A majority of the people are living in extreme poverty, though the tenure of Millennium     Development Goals (MDGs) is going to expire in 2015, which aim to halve the poverty by that time, speakers at a seminar in Dhaka have pointed out.

See more at: http://observerbd.com/details.php?id=21597#sthash.XHG0JWuY.dpuf

A national seminar on ‘Post 2015 Development Agenda: Towards a Transformative and Rights Based Development Framework’ was held at National Press Club in the city on Saturday.

A large number of stakeholders including NGOs, academicians, civil society organisations, trade unions, women groups, rights organisations and students, attended the programme.

VOICE, a rights-based organisation, and Beyond 2015, arranged the seminar, with eminent economist Dr Kazi Kholiquzzaman in the chair.

See more at: http://www.daily-sun.com/details_%E2%80%98Reduce-inequality-in-Post-2015-

See more at: http://observerbd.com/details.php?id=21549#sthash.6cp8atc8.dpuf

Ahmed Swapan Mahmud

Executive Director, VOICE House 67, Block-Ka Pisciculture Housing Society Shyamoli, Dhaka 1207, Bangladesh
Tel : +88-02-8158688, Cell-phone : +88-01711-881919,
Website : www.voicebd.org

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UNEP Post 2015 Note #6 and Note #7

 

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of the Executive Office and the Special Advisor to the Executive Director on Post-2015/SDGs, please find attached UNEP’s Post-2015 Note #6 an Note #7  for your kind information. 

We would once again highly appreciate if the Note could be disseminated further to your good Offices to your respective contact lists. We also appreciate any feedback/comments you may have on the note, which can be sent to this email address.unep.post2015@unep.org

The documents can be found at:

Note # 6 : http://www.unep.org/post2015/Portals/50240/Documents/unep_post_2015_note_6.pdf

Note # 7: http://www.unep.org/post2015/Portals/50240/Documents/unep_post_2015_note_7.pdf

Many thanks and kind regards

Susan Kihiu

Post 2015 Group

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The post-2015 era and a different view on finance

infoNote June 2014info Note__ While the future global development framework is emerging, the concept of development finance is changing rapidly. New and innovative sources like climate finance and instruments like equity investments, bonds and guarantees in support of private sector investments evolve. For many developing countries ODA is becoming less important and its definition a leverage point of political and strategic debate. Modernising ODA is OECD’s contribution to the post-2015 agenda — a process that goes far beyond upgrading the OECD/DAC statistical system, but to identify new ways and means of financing development.

 2014-05-Platform-InfoNote-ODA-modernisation

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Bridging solutions for the post-2015 agenda

Diverse and colorful landscape bridges agriculture and conservation in Peru

M. Ann Tutwiler’s latest blog post urges global leaders to join forces as discussions for climate change solutions take place this week in Bonn at the UNFCC Conference in parallel with ongoing work to define post-2015 Sustainable Development global targets.

This week in Bonn, Germany, global leaders meet for another milestone discussion at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) conference. Alongside these talks, the United Nations continues the process to outline global targets for the post-2015 Sustainable Development Agenda. These two separate streams of dialogue could generate separate sets of solutions.

Bioversity International leads the Bridging Agriculture and Conservation Initiative (BACI), that brings together thought leaders and global experts to develop policy and management options to sustainably feed a growing population while at the same time, ensuring that agricultural ecosystems remain biodiverse, productive and resilient. As we bridge the different goals between agriculture and conservation, we need to also bridge the development dialogue.

At last year’s BACI launch, Braulio Dias, Executive Secretary of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), who forms part of the BACI leadership, stated that ongoing discussion to establish a sustainable development agenda is disconnected and called for different sectors to work together for win-win solutions that will have implications for the coming decade. The following proposed solutions seek to bridge dialogues and align different development agendas:

  • Focus beyond staple crops to address sustainable consumption  Agricultural diversity provides a rich source of naturally available nutrients which can improve dietary diversity, which in turn, can improve health and nutrition. The global initiative of the Global Environment Facility, ‘Mainstreaming biodiversity for nutrition and health’, led by Brazil, Kenya, Turkey and Sri Lanka, promotes the conservation and use of local crop and tree biodiversity as a cost-effective solution to malnutrition. The initiative is coordinated by Bioversity International with the United Nations Environment Programme and UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) as implementation agencies.
  • Re-conceptualize agriculture as a provider of ecosystem services and biodiversity for sustainable production  Agricultural landscapes have the potential to make major contributions to both biodiversity conservation and the provision of ecosystem services – the benefits that people get from nature such as pollination, the provision of clean air and water, natural pest and disease control and many more.  Bioversity International has been carrying out research in Uganda where bean yields have consistently remained lower than the potential yield, mostly due to yield losses from pests and diseases. We have seen that when farmers grow three or more bean varieties together in their fields, they experience significantly less damage to their crop than those growing just one variety.
  • Promote economic instruments for biodiversity and ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes Many farming communities depend on agricultural biodiversity and ecosystem services for their livelihoods, yet the focus of markets, policies and research has been on specialization and economies of scale, where biodiversity is often viewed as an impediment to increasing individual crop productivity and farm income. Therefore, we must support initiatives (e.g. The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity) that have already been very active in developing approaches for assessing and incorporating the values of biodiversity and ecosystem services into decision-making through incentives and price signals.  Bioversity International has been investigating the application of Payment for Ecosystem Services, specifically for agricultural biodiversity conservation in Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, India and Nepal. We have been testing the potential of competitive tenders to create cost-efficient strategies to conserve priority endangered species and also improve farmer livelihoods.
  • More inclusive measures of biodiversity and land cover change while recognizing the importance of genetic diversity According to the Convention on Biological Diversity, in the context of climate change, genetic diversity of agricultural biodiversity provides species with the ability to adapt to changing environment and evolve, by increasing their tolerance to frost, high temperature, drought and water-logging, as well as their resistance to particular diseases, pests and parasites. The evolution of biodiversity, and therefore both its and our survival, mainly depends on this genetic diversity.

 

This week’s Bonn dialogue will continue the debate on climate change negotiations and lead to a defining year for sustainable development in 2015 when the sustainable development goals will be finalized and the Paris negotiations on climate will come to a decision. The idea is to promote a world with more equity, as Dias said at the BACI launch in Rio last year. The solution lies in providing scientific evidence to guide these types of policy decisions; bridging agriculture and conservation solutions.

Find out more about the Bridging Agriculture and Conservation Initative (BACI) and follow events over in Bonn at the UNFCC Climate Change Conference until June 14th on Twitter #UNFCC #SB40

M. Ann Tutwiler

Email: a.tutwiler(at)cgiar.org

Image: Diverse and colorful landscape bridges agriculture and conservation in Peru. Credit: Bioversity International/D.Hunter

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‘Yes to Youth Goal’ Thundercla​p – please sign-up and send on

Dear youth leaders,  

Could I ask you to take 1 minute to sign up to the ‘Yes to Youth Goal’ Thunderclap? This is a social media campaign to ensure the world adopts a specific Youth Goal when a successor to the Millennium Development Goals is agreed.

All you need is a Twitter or Facebook account to take part. Full details below.

We have just 12 days to reach our target of another extra 80 people!

Sign up here: https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/11377-say-yes-to-youth-goal?locale=en

Say Yes to Youth Goal

A development goal for young people post-2015

There are over 1.8 billion young people in the world, many of whom endure pervasive inequality and inadequate social, political and economic opportunities.

As global policymakers look to agree a set of sustainable development targets to replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the Commonwealth is calling for the adoption of a Youth Goal.

A Youth Goal would ensure the economic, social and political empowerment and participation of young people and help this generation contribute to all aspects of national development, as active participants, champions and custodians.

  • 1.8 billion people     globally are aged 10-24: a quarter of the world’s population
  • 87% of     young people aged 15-24 live in a developing context
  • 13% of     15-24 year-olds are unemployed, next to 4.6% for all adults
  • 2.6 million young     people aged 10-24 die each year; mostly preventable deaths

Join the campaign to make sure there is a Youth Goal.

By signing up to our Thunderclap, you will be agreeing to send the below automated tweet on 19 June 2014, during the Twelfth session of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals, at United Nations Headquarters. This is the exact time that policymakers will be discussing the new development goals.

“Time for a #Youth Goal for the economic, social & political empowerment of young people #yes2youthgoal #post2015 #OWG”

Learn more at thecommonwealth.org/yes2youthgoal

What is Thunderclap?

Thunderclap is a tool that lets a message be heard when you and your friends say it together. Join a Thunderclap, and you and others will share the same message at the same time, spreading an idea through Facebook and Twitter that cannot be ignored.

What exactly am I agreeing to when I authorize my Facebook or Twitter account?

You’re allowing Thunderclap to share a single message on your behalf. This is only the case when you click the button on the campaign page to support with Twitter, Facebook, or Tumblr. After the campaign is complete, we won’t post any additional messages.

More here: https://www.thunderclap.it/faq

 

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G77 countries plus China support stand-alon​e goal on equality for the new SDGs  !

Dear Colleagues,


I have some wonderful news, and a request.
First the good news: the G77 (a group of 77 countries that formed an alliance within the UN to counteract the powerful G8 countries), plus China, have made strong statements in favor of a stand-alone goal on equality for the new SDGs!
This is very important for the world’s dialogue on the relationship between inequality, poverty, and sustainable development. You can see the G77 statements made at UN headquarters in New York this past week at these links:
IfE also proposed a stand-alone goal on equality at meetings of the Open Working Group (OWG) in November of 2013, and again in a formal written proposal developed through our network in January of 2014. You can see the IfE proposal here: https://www.initiativeforequality.org/images/InitiativeforEquality_GoalonEquality_ThematicPositionPaper%20_Jan2014.pdf
Now for the request: can you contact your own country’s national delegation to the UN, to support the stand-alone goal on equality? First check to see if your country is a member of the G77: http://www.g77.org/doc/members.html. If it is, please offer them your thanks and support, and encourage them to stand strong.  If your country is not part of the G77, please contact your national delegation to urge them to support the stand-alone goal and targets as well. You can find names, addresses, email and telephone numbers for all the national delegations here:  http://www.un.int/protocol/bluebook/bb304.pdf
Warning: other countries may be working behind-the-scenes to kill the stand-alone goal on equality. Despite the public statements made in favor of it, and despite the fact that the co-chairs of the OWG have voiced support, it was dropped from the list of proposed goals. This means that there are powerful forces trying to block it.
We must speak up now to tell the UN: addressing inequalities is necessary to ending poverty and conflict, and creating equitable and sustainable societies!
With thanks and warm regards,
Anthony Akpan
President
Pan African Vision for the Environment (PAVE)
2nd Floor, Rear Flat,
59, Palm Avenue, Mushin
P.O.BOX 494 , Ijanikin, Lagos, Nigeria
Tel: 08033510419, 08035423750

 

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    Click here to visit the Post-2015 Policy & Practice knowledgebase.

Post 2015:  Policy & Practice

From: Sarah Czunyi <sarah@copenhagenconsensus.com>
Date: May 6, 2014 8:37:45 AM EDT
Subject: WORLD’S TOP ECONOMISTS ASSESS EFFECTIVENESS OF POS
Reply-To: Sarah Czunyi <sarah@copenhagenconsensus.com>
Today the Post 2015 Consensus has released a groundbreaking benefit-cost assessment of the 140 draft targets currently being considered by the Open Working Group. 
Some of the world’s leading economists have ranked each of the proposed targets from “phenomenal” to “poor”, according to potential benefit-cost ratios. The calculation of benefits includes not only monetary value, but also health and environmental impacts. 
This new analysis supports the prioritization of goals and targets that can do the most good. The working paper is a precursor to more detailed benefit-cost research which will be released later in the year.
The cover page of the report can be found below, and the full analysis can be accessed here.
The Post 2015 Consensus is also co-hosting a side-event at the OWG called “Using Economic Evidence to Identify the Most Effective Sustainable Development Goals and Targets.” The event will run on Thursday, May 8th from 1-2.30pm in Conference Room 6 of the North Lawn Building. All interested are welcome to attend. 
——

Preliminary Benefit-Cost Assessment

for 11th Session OWG Goals

In a world of limited resources, we can’t do everything, so which goals should we prioritize? The Copenhagen Consensus Cen- ter provides information on which targets will do the most social good (measured in dollars, but also incorporating e.g. welfare, health and environmental protection), relative to their costs. Some of the world’s top economists have assessed the targetsfrom the 11th session Open Working Group document into one of five categories, based on economic evidence:

Phenomenal, Good, Fair, Poor and not enough knowledge

The decision on choosing goals will rest on a number of factors, not just economics – but knowing the costs and benefits provides an important piece of information. Given the short turnaround, the results should be considered informative, but preliminary. The Copenhagen Consensus will present full, peer-reviewed economic evidence over the coming half year.

Just think: if we could prioritize a goal that saves 10 lives for every $250,000 spent, over another goal that saves 1 life for the same amount, we could do billions of dollars more good over the next 15 years!

PHENOMENAL targets: Robust evidence for benefits more than 15 times higher than costs

1. e) achieve full and productive employment for allreduce barriers to productive employment for including women and young people 2. b) end reduce by 50% or more malnutrition in all its forms, notably stunting and wasting in children under five years of age 3. b) by 2030 end the epidemics of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases reverse the spread of, and significantly reduce deaths from tuberculosis and malaria (see notes for disease specific targets) 3. c) achieve universal health coverage (UHC), including financial risk protection, with particular attention to the most marginalizedassuming a gradual increase in coverage over time, focusing first on diseases where interventions have high benefits-to-costs 3. (f) and 5. i) ensure universal access to comprehensive sexual and reproductive health for all, including modern methods of family planning 4. c) by 2030 increase by x% the proportion of children able to access and complete quality pre-primary education 5. c) by 2030 ensure equal access to education at all levels 7. a) by 2030 ensure universal increased access to sustainable modern energy services  7. e) by 2030 2050 phase out fossil fuel subsidies that encourage wasteful consumption 15. a) promote open, rules-based, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading and financial systems, including complying with the agricultural mandate of the WTO Doha Round 15. c) improve market access for agricultural and industrial exports of developing countries, especially Least Developed Countries, and at least double the share of LDCs’ exports in global exports by 2020

POOR targets: The benefits are smaller than costs or target poorly specified (e.g. internally inconsistent, incentivizes wrong activity)

1. e) achieve full and productive employment for all, including women and young people (some unemployment necessary for efficient labor markets) 2. h) achieve by 2030 protection of agricultural biodiversity, including through use of the practices and local knowledge related to agro-biodiversity and diversity of food 3. h) Eliminate narcotic drug and substance abuse  4. f) integrate relevant knowledge and skills in education curricula, including ICT skills, education for sustainable development, and awareness raising on culture’s contribution to sustainable development  5. j) promote the availability of gender disaggregated data to improve gender equality policies, including gender sensitive budgeting 7. b) double the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix by 2030  8. j) encourage formalization of informal sector activities and employment 11. h) create incentives for sustainable tourism 12. a) hold the increase in global average temperature below an x°C rise in accordance with international agreements

15. s) countries progressively introduce expanded measures of progress beyond GDP into national accounting, with supportive statistical capacity building in developing countries
——-
Sarah Czunyi

Project Manager 

Copenhagen Consensus Center
Skype: sarah.consensus

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Submission for post 2015 list

Dear All,

Community consultation to identify the most important and most critical challenges for global change science to address in the next 5 years

 

If the future of global change research were in your hands, what would you focus on? Identifying extinction hotspots, understanding the impacts of sea level rise, or investigating how cultural values influence perceptions of risk?

 

Future Earth, the global research platform providing the knowledge and support to accelerate our transformations to a sustainable world, invites you to contribute to an online consultation on the key issues and knowledge gaps that global change science needs to address over the next 5 years.

 

Please take part in this brief online survey in order to give feedback on the challenges that have already been proposed by the international scientific community, and to share your ideas on priorities for research. The survey will close on 13 May 2014.

 

Future Earth is a 10-year international research programme that will provide critical knowledge required for societies to face the challenges posed by global environmental change and to identify opportunities for a transition to global sustainability. The programme was launched at the Rio+20 Conference by the Science and Technology Alliance for Global Sustainability, comprising the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), the Belmont Forum of funding agencies, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the United Nations University (UNU), and the World Meteorological Organization as an observer.

 

ENDS

________________________

Lizzie Sayer  |  Communications Coordinator, Future Earth Future Earth interim Secretariat

International Council for Science (ICSU)

5 rue Auguste Vacquerie, 75116 Paris, France  Tel.   +33 1 45 25 57 76  |  Fax.   +33 1 42 88 94 31  |  lizzie.sayer@futureearth.info |  www.futureearth.info | www.icsu.org

Follow us on Twitter @FutureEarth @ICSUnews Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/futureearth.info   www.facebook.com/InternationalScience

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Call For Applicatio​ns: Post-2015 Youth Global Strategy

 

Call For Applications: Post-2015 Youth Global Strategy

 

Youth Coalition for Sexual and Reproductive Rights

WHY? Young people have an important role to play in the lead up to the Post-2015 Development Agenda. For the last two years, several youth organizations and coalitions have been involved through difference consultations, UN meetings, reports and other spaces.

WHAT? Given that the new development agenda is fast approaching and the importance of mobilizing across movements and regions, the Youth Coalition for Sexual and Reproductive Rights (YCSRR) is organizing a global strategy meeting for young activists involved in the Post-2015 discussions. The purpose of the meeting will be to strategize around engagement and agenda setting across youth movements, advancing young people’s demands going into Post-2015 and building upon the inter-linkages between development issues and sexual and reproductive rights.

WHO? Young people from all regions who are involved in the Post-2015 UN Process are invited to apply. The meeting is open to young people working on sexual and reproductive rights as well as those coming from other movements. Please note that young people from the Global South will have priority.

WHEN? 6-8 June 2014

WHERE? Bangkok, Thailand

Criteria for Participation:

Youth aged 18 to 29 years old;Agreement with YCSRR Principles and Values;Active member of an organization involved in the Post-2015 development agenda discussions;Experience in the post-2015 process at the national, regional or global level.Demonstrated experience in advocacy;Proficient in English;Committed to actively follow-up for at least 6 months, in order to implement outcome strategies;Interested in Sexual and Reproductive Rights and the inter-linkages with youth movement(s) and the Post-2015 Development Agenda

Scholarships

The meeting will include both funded and self-funded participants. A limited number of scholarships will be available for participants from the Global South.

Pre-Meeting SOGI Training

The YCSRR is hosting a one-day pre-meeting training for a small number of LGBTIQ activists participating in the Global Strategy Meeting. All interested participants must apply to both the pre-training and Global Strategy Meeting to be considered. Issues related to diverse Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) have been largely ignored in the process leading up to the Post-2015 Development Agenda. The training will provide young LGBTIQ activists with information related to the process to date as well as opportunities and strategies for integrating SOGI into the new development agenda. The meeting will take place in Bangkok, Thailand on 5 June 2014 and is open to a small number of LGBTIQ activists only. Global Strategy Meeting Participants interested in SOGI issues who are outside of the LGBT movement will have an opportunity to discuss these issues during the strategy meeting itself. All participants of the pre-meeting SOGI training must also attend the Global Strategy Meeting.Only one person per organization will be considered. Young people from the Global South, LGBTIQ and human rights activists as well as young activists working outside of the sexual and reproductive rights movement are strongly encouraged to apply. The meeting will be in English only; translation services will not be made available. Self-funded participants must also submit a full application. LGBTIQ activists interested in the pre-meeting SOGI training must apply to both the training and global strategy meeting to be considered.

All interested applicants must complete the application form by Midnight EDT on Wednesday 7 May 2014. Incomplete applications and applications received after Midnight EDT on Wednesday 7 May 2014 will not be considered

Source: http://www.awid.org/Get-Involved/Calls-for-Participation2/Call-for-Applications-Post-2015-Youth-Global-Strategy-Meeting

Have questions? Please write to programs@youthcoalition.org

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Letter on modalities and NGO Major Group Statement

OWG 11

1) Letter presented Thursday morning to the Co-Chairs of Denmark and Papua New Guinea from Major Groups, Beyond 2015 and GCAP on modalities for the Post-2015 Summit and associated preparatory processes. This letter was addressed to Denmark & PNG, current &  next PGA, and distributed to SG, OWG co-chairs and all Permanent Missions.

2) NGO Major Group statement presented at morning hearing on Monday, 5 May.

–  Jeffery Huffines NGO Major Group Organizing Partner CIVICUS UN Representative (NY)
Cell: +1 646-707-1060 Email: jeffery.huffines@civicus.org Skype: jefferyvhuffines CIVICUS: World Alliance for
Citizen Participation PO BOX 933, Southdale 2135, JHB, South Africa www.civicus.org
Follow threats and take action to protect civil society – join Civil Society Watch at www.cswatch.orgP Please don’t print this e-mail unless you really need to. Thank you.
2 bijlagen
Stakeholder Letter – modalities for Post-2015 Summit_Final.pdf
OWG 11 – NGO Statement – FINAL.pdf

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[Beyond 2015:301] Policy briefing: Sustainabl​e developmen​t requires a ¨fiscal revolution

Sustainable development requires a ¨fiscal revolution¨
This new briefing can be dowloanded in pdf format here: http://www.cesr.org/downloads/fiscal.revolution.pdf
Never before has the world enjoyed such abundant resources to realize just and sustainable development for all people everywhere. Yet, never before have these resources, and the decision-making power over them, been so unfairly distributed. As talks over the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be adopted next year move into their final phase, it is crucial that the generation and allocation of financial resources for this endeavor be tackled from a human rights perspective.
A new briefing from the Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR) and Christian Aid—released for the 11th session of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals—sets out the commitments needed to deliver a ‘Post-2015 Fiscal Revolution’ by integrating human rights standards into the design of fiscal policy at both the national and international levels. In so doing, it offers a blueprint for ensuring sufficient, equitable and accountable financing for sustainable development in line with international human rights standards that the vast majority of states have committed to in principle, though rarely honored in practice.
First, ensuring sufficiency of resources requires a range of complementary domestic and global fiscal commitments that, taken together, can unleash at least US$1.5 trillion per year in additional public funding. Second, a fiscal revolution would boost socio-economic equality by more fairly distributing the burdens and benefits of sustainable development financing both within and between countries. Accountability, the third key dimension of this undertaking, requires enhanced transparency, meaningful participation and public oversight of domestic and global tax and fiscal decision-making.
As negotiations over the new sustainable development framework move towards fruition, a once-in-a-generation opportunity has emerged to incentivize governments to take bold steps, individually and in concert, towards a genuinely transformative agenda. The briefing sets out a series of fiscal commitments which CESR and Christian Aid believe should be on embedded in the SDG targets and metrics themselves, in the means of financing these goals, and in the monitoring and accountability architecture required. It proposes six targets, along with associated indicators, to:
  1. Raise sufficient public resources to finance high quality essential services for all.
  2. End cross-border tax evasion, return stolen assets, forgive odious debt and progressively combat tax abuses.
  3. Reduce economic inequality within countries through enhanced use of progressive taxation on income and wealth.
  4. Improve redistributive capacities to progressively reduce disparities in the enjoyment of human rights by all socio-economic groups, and between women and men, in all regions.
  5. Ensure the rights to information and participation of all people, without exclusion or discrimination, in the design, implementation, financing and monitoring of public policies.
  6. Guarantee public and judicial oversight of the generation and use of public resources

In light of the information gaps which make fiscal processes opaque, the briefing includes recommendations on how the post-2015 “data revolution” can boost the availability, disaggregation and quality of domestic and cross-border fiscal data. In the lead-up to the third international conference on financing for development, the briefing also proposes several ways to reinvigorate democratic and effective multilateral co-operation to ensure sufficient, equitable and accountable financing of sustainable development.

– Luke Holland Researcher/Communications Coordinator Center for Economic and Social Rights Telephone: +1.718.237.9145

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UN-NGLS New Resource: The 2015 Post, Issue #6

UN-NGLS New Resource: The 2015 Post, Issue #6

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IN THIS ISSUE
  1. “Post-2015 Agenda Not Complete Without Peace and Security,” Highlights President of General Assembly’s 24-25 April Thematic Debate
  2. General Assembly and ECOSOC Conduct Joint Event on the Role of Partnerships in the Post-2015 Development Agenda on 9-10 April
  3. Open Working Group on SDGs 10th Session in April; OWG11 Taking Place 5-9 May
  4. UN Commission on Population Concludes Adopting Consensus Resolution
  5. Social Forum Focuses on the Rights of Older Persons
  6. The ICPD Programme of Action and Beyond 2014 Review Should Guide The Post-2015 Development Agenda, Say Experts at CPD47
  7. Growing Urban Inequality and Equity Feature High on WUF-7 Agenda
  8. Register for the Sustainable Energy for All Forum, 4-6 June 2014 at UN Headquarters
  1. The Right to the City: Strategic approach for the Post-2015 and the Habitat III Global Agendas, by Lorena Zárate, President of Habitat International Coalition (HIC)
  2. Exploring Elements of a Global Development Agenda for International Trade and Investment, by Sanya Reid Smith and Ranja Sengupta, Third World Network (TWN)   
  3. Finance and the Post-2015 Agenda, By Aldo Caliari, Director, Rethinking Bretton Woods Project, Center of Concern
  1. UNEP Releases Briefing Notes on Post-2015

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monitoring and accountabi​lity for Post 2015 – Presentati​on Roberto Bissio – Social Watch

 

The President of the UN General Assembly’s convened the Interactive Dialogue “Elements for a Monitoring and Accountability Framework for the Post-2015 Development Agenda” that was held on May 1, 2014 in the United Nations Headquarters in New York. The outcome of the event will provide an additional input into the report mandated to the Secretary-General to synthesize all inputs available by the end of 2014.
Roberto Bissio, Social Watch Coordinator, who participated in the panel highlighted that accountability is only meaningful if the powerful can be brought into account. We firmly believe that it is up to citizens to hold their own governments accountable. Corporations have to be made accountable not only to their owners and consumers but to their workers and to the people that are affected by their operations. Corporate accountability requires rules set by governments, respect for human rights and environmental due diligence as well as reporting, ensuring access by those negatively affected to an effective remedy, tax transparency; proper land appropriation rules, etc.
Read below his complete intervention or see the video here: https://vimeo.com/93644345
Barbara Adams
* * * * * * * * * * *
Presentation by Social Watch coordinator Roberto Bissio at the Interactive Dialogue
“Elements for a Monitoring and Accountability Framework for the Post-2015 Development Agenda” convened by the President of the General Assembly of the United Nations New York, 1 May 2014
Some four thousand years ago, King Hammurabi had the laws of his domains between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers carved in stone and placed in front of his palace. The laws were written in the plain language of the people, not in the arcane idiom of the priests, so that everybody could understand them. They were not engraved on clay, so they could not be changed overnight at will, and they were not hidden, so that all were able to access them and learn, for example, that even judges had a duty not to betray the rules in their decisions.
The basic principles of accountability of the rulers to the ruled were thus created. Much more recently, only two hundred years ago, La Declaration des Droits de l’Homme et du Citoyen in 1789 stated that every citizen has the right to check the need to pay taxes(1) and that society has the right to hold every public agent accountable.(2)
The idea that the people are at the base of a society and should be protected by justice is not new and is not the intellectual property of any specific region. It was articulated in the 14th century by the Arab philosopher ibn Khaldun, the father of modern sociology, who in his Muqaddimah quotes Aristotle (who worked from Alexandria, in what is now Egypt) as having established political wisdom in the following eight sentences:
“1. The world is a garden the fence of which is the dynasty (the state). 2. The (state) dynasty has the authority that defines proper behavior. 3. Proper behavior becomes policy when directed by the ruler. 4. The ruler is an institution supported by the soldiers. 5. The soldiers are helpers who are maintained by money. 6. Money is sustenance brought together by the subjects. 7. The subjects are servants who are protected by justice. 8. Justice is the harmony that makes the world a garden”.
If we translate “the garden” as “sustainable development” we have here all the elements that we need for a renewed agenda: Policy and regulations, means of implementation (taxes) and compliance mechanisms (justice) which is what we really want to talk about when we talk about monitoring and accountability.
In the last decades all rulers of the world have committed themselves to the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (1948), that spells out the basic principles of human dignity, the Rio Declaration (1992) that spells out the rights of future generations, the Copenhagen and Beijing declarations (1995) that promise to eradicate poverty and achieve gender equality and the Millennium Declaration (2000) that commits them to ensure the simultaneous realization of a triangle framed by peace and security on one vertex, democracy and human rights on the second and last but not least development and social justice.
Those commitments were translated into every language and carved in the Internet, videos, radio and printed papers that all can access and are more difficult to hide and erase than a stone. Yet, the non compliance with these promises, while morally condemned in all cultures and places, is not punished and not even properly monitored. The commitments made to society tend to be easily forgotten if organized citizens and communities are not constantly reminding them.
Social Watch was created in 1995 to help governments remember their promises and to assist those governed to monitor the achievements… or lack of them. Nowadays the Social Watch network has active coalitions that group over a thousand organizations in eighty countries. Each national alliance defines independently its own priorities, its message and how to engage with their authorities. To participate in the global network they commit themselves to be inclusive, to report honestly and to engage in advocacy in order to improve the quality of the policies and the openness of the mechanisms that define them. The global network will in turn amplify the national voices, help them use methodological tools, such as the innovating indexes on gender equity and on basic capabilities that Social Watch developed, and collectively hold international organizations accountable for their own commitments.
In doing that, we found something that probably Hammurabi already knew: Accountability is only meaningful if the powerful can be brought into account. The powerful are the landowner, the major and the chief of police for a distant rural community. In the world as a whole the powerful are the big countries, the intergovernmental institutions (particularly those dealing with trade and finances), transnational corporations and even some huge foundations and INGOs with budgets of billions of dollars.
We firmly believe that it is up to citizens to hold their own governments accountable. In exercising these right, our member coalitions have managed in some countries to identify millions of dollars of “pork barrels” hiding in obscure budget provisions and redirect them to support genuine social development. They have also avoided civil wars through the development of credible election monitoring mechanisms based on social networks.
Very often, the Social Watch national coalitions have also found in practice that the smaller, poorer or more vulnerable a country is the more it is being held accountable to foreign actors. All countries are subject to report to their peers on compliance with their human rights legal obligations under the Universal Periodic Review of the Human Right Council. This is a major step forward. But developing countries also have to report about their compliance with WTO accession commitments; they are supervised by the IMF, even if they are not debtors, and they report to each of their bilateral donors individually and also collectively. When the recipient country government sits on a table with its 12 to 25 donors, who are frequently also its creditors, plus the World Bank, the IMF and the regional development banks this is called “mutual accountability!” I would argue this is not the best setting for the developing country to interpellate its donors about not meeting their 0.7% commitment or to ask the IMF about the unfulfilled promised increase in the voting power of African countries.
In fact, our members frequently observe that accountability to the citizens is frequently postponed or undermined by this accountability to the powerful in ways that weaken the role of parliaments and undermine democratic institutions. To make matters worse, over two thousand bilateral and regional trade and investment agreements signed in the last few decades have created new rights for transnational corporations, including rights that humans don’t have: corporations have acquired the right to settle anywhere they want and bring with them any personnel they decide they need, they are allowed to repatriate profits without restrictions and even to litigate against governments in demand of profits lost because of democratically decided policies, not through local courts but via international arbitration panels shaped to defend business interests and where human rights do not necessarily prevail. ICSID, the International Center for the Settlement of Investment Disputes, hosted by the World Bank, is an un transparent tribunal that displaces national judiciary and in a way creates its own law by way of ignoring human rights standards and environmental norms, even when they have been ratified as international treaties.
No single duty was created for corporations to compensate for this expansion of their rights and that may well be one of the reasons for the current disproportionate share of capital in the capture of the benefits of growth and the symmetric reduction in the share of labour in those benefits that is so overwhelmingly documented by Thomas Picketty for most countries, rich and poor. (3)
Corporations have to be made accountable not only to their owners and consumers but to their workers and to the people that are affected by their operations. Corporate accountability requires rules set by governments, respect for human rights and environmental due diligence as well as reporting, ensuring access by those negatively affected to an effective remedy, tax transparency; proper land appropriation rules, etc.
We do want, of course, to harness the power and the money from corporations and the huge foundations thay they support to make them contribute to sustainable development (starting perhaps with the old medical principle of “first, do no harm”) but no “partnership” will really contribute if it is not accountable.
The Righting Finance coalition, of which Social Watch is a member, has elaborated a set of minimum criteria to be applied to all actors wanting to benefit from “partnering” with the United Nations, among them the mandatory declaration of any conflict of interest, and careful “vetting” of their human rights background and performance. (4) Fiscal resources, wether domestic or ODA-originated “should only be applied to support the private sector in instances where it can be demonstrated concretely that a) such allocation will advance certain rights, b) this is a more effective use of such resources than through public investment, c) mechanisms exist for the transparent and public participation of those affected by the use of those resources and d) performance in meeting the promised targets will be evaluated and monitored periodically, with lack of compliance credibly giving rise to a withdrawal of the fiscal support.”
Corporations in partnership with the UN should be subject to at least the reporting requirements already established for NGOs, which include regular reporting to ECOSOC, including on their finances and their origins, demonstrated adherence to Human Rights and UN principles a description of initiatives undertaken to support the MDGs and demonstrated contribution to the work of the UN.
The mandate for this reporting already exists, and has been approved by the UN General Assembly as part of the Guiding Principles on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights and the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. These principles require, for example, an impact assessment of multilateral organizations, corporations and the trade and investment regime. This important mandate needs to be implemented. The Rio decision about the creation of the High Level Political Forum (HLPF) clearly wants to empower this Forum to be the place for these reviews. For that to happen the Forum needs to be properly assisted by a strong secretariat, informed by adequate reporting and carefully prepared by an active chair or troika that provides continuity and leadership.
Following the Rio+20 mandate on universality, all governments and multilateral organizations have to be accountable. The Global Partnership for Development, described in Goal 8 of the MDGs not only has no timeline, but also no proper accountability mechanism. No wonder it lacked implementation. A new agenda for development has to be specific about Means of Implementation and also about the forum for review and the monitoring and accountability mechanism, which could well be a strengthened HLPF as described above, to which multilateral agencies, the Bretton Woods Institutions and any corporation or “partnership” wanting to use the UN name, logo or flag should be required to report.
Accountability doesn’t happen without transparency and access to information: Corporations should report their accounts on a country-by-country basis, countries need to keep public registers of company owners, among other basic information provisions. In general citizens should have access not only to corporate information but also to all government documents, as well as to those of multilateral organizations. In particular, the secrecy involving the work of arbitration panels in investor-states disputes needs to be declared as contrary to basic accountability and human rights principles. Banking secrecy undermining the ability of countries to tax their citizens or corporations operating in their territories needs to be identified as a major obstacle to the achievement of human rights and development goals and this should be a major issue to address in the context of the FfD debates.
Monitoring and accountability needs to be institutionalized, but ensuring an enabling environment for civil society is key for any accountability to “work”. Civil society uses all available tools, including so called “social networks” based on the Internet. But the key role of organized civil society cannot be substituted by easily manipulated web-based instruments.
The National Council on Public Polls (NCPP) of the United States, which includes the major TV networks and several universities as members explains in its website that “unscientific pseudo-polls are widespread and sometimes entertaining, but they never provide the kind of information that belongs in a serious report”. Examples of those polls “include 900-number call-in polls, man-on-the-street surveys, many Internet polls (…)”.
In a scientific poll, explains NCPP, “the pollster identifies and seeks out the people to be interviewed. In an unscientific poll, the respondents usually “volunteer” their opinions, selecting themselves for the poll”. Ignoring this basic recommendations, serious reports by the UN secretariat quote web-based polls as if they were genuine consultations with civil society. This practice should be avoided.
“Big data” has enormous potential, but it has potential for evil as well as for good and in promoting a “data revolution” as part of any monitoring and accountability mechanism due attention needs to be given to the issues of privacy and rights, as well as to the fact that, contrary to the democratization of access brought by miniaturization, “big data” requires big computing capabilities to be harnessed, so big that they are out of the reach of most civil society organizations and even of most developing countries. Finally, madame chairperson, let me quote a partner in a major global auditing and consultancy firm in stating that “accountability is not accounting”. It cannot be left to accountants or other bureaucrats. Every development project and every “partnership” should have in its budget a provision to support independent civil society accountability mechanisms at least with the same amount as the one devoted to auditing. Seven centuries ago, Ibn Khaldun concluded that “the lesson is that injustice ruins civilization. The ruin of civilization has as its consequence the complete destruction of the dynasty (state)”. Without effective monitoring and accountability of the powerful there will be no development agenda and the multilateral system will loose its legitimacy.
Thank you, Madame Chairperson

Notes:
(1) Article XIV: Tous les Citoyens ont le droit de constater, par eux-mêmes ou par leurs Représentants, la nécessité de la contribution publique, de la consentir librement, d’en suivre l’emploi et d’en déterminer la quotité, l’assiette, le recouvrement et la durée.
(2) Article XV: La Société a le droit de demander compte à tout Agent public de son administration.
(3) Piketty, Thomas, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, Harvard University Press, 2014
(4) Statement by Righting Finance Initiative1 on “Co-Creating New Partnerships for Financing Sustainable Development” April 3-4, 2014, Helsinki, Finland.

Available at:http://www.rightingfinance.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Read-full-statement.pdf
(5) Gawiser, Sheldon R., Ph.D. and G. Evans Witt, “20 Questions A Journalist Should Ask About Poll Results”, Third Edition, NCPP, available at http://www.ncpp.org/?q=node/4– list Post Rio+20 UN Sustainable Development (secr: EEB-unit: Global Policies and Sustainability)

 

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Statement of 31 UN Experts on Post 2015 and media

Hi everyone,
I thought you might be interested in this new release and joint statement from 31 UN Special Rapporteurs on Post 2015 and media,  access to information, public participation and freedom of association and assembly. Its a good indicator of interest that so many have agreed to the statement.
Also, ARTICLE 19 has set up a new campaign and resource site on Post 2015 and these governance-related issues at http://www.empoweringdevelopment.org/
Dave
David Banisar
Senior Legal Counsel
—-

For World Press Freedom Day – Saturday 3 May 2014  Absence of free media greatly compromises development – UN experts

GENEVA (3 May 2014) – On the occasion of World Press Freedom Day, a group of 31 specialists* from the largest body of independent experts in the United Nations Human Rights system called on all Governments to promote and protect the rights to freedom of expression and information, freedom of peaceful assembly, and freedom of association and public participation, essential for the full realization of all human rights for all and for the achievement of related development goals:
“States must develop more inclusive political processes and allow the media to play a key role in guaranteeing the right of everyone, including those vulnerable to exclusion and discrimination, to freely access information and engage in meaningful development related discourse.
Individuals and communities, including marginalized ones, must be empowered to claim their rights. Democratic, transparent and participatory decision-making related to sustainable development improves effective delivery of public services, reduces corruption and increases good governance at all levels.     We are deeply concerned at the ongoing attacks on journalists and human rights defenders involved in demanding good governance and governmental accountability, fighting corruption and protecting the human rights of those living in poverty.
Without free media to advocate for and monitor the implementation of the new set of post-2015 targets, there can be no real development for all marginalized, vulnerable or discriminated against. Not now, not ever.”
(*) Read the open letter by the independent human rights experts: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=14558&LangID=E
ENDS
The United Nations human rights experts are part of what it is known as the Special Procedures of the Human Rights Council. Special Procedures, the largest body of independent experts in the UN Human Rights, is the general name of the independent fact-finding and monitoring mechanisms of the Human Rights Council that address either specific country situations or thematic issues in all parts of the world.
They are charged by the Human Rights Council to monitor, report and advise on human rights issues. Currently, there are 37 thematic mandates and 14 mandates related to countries and territories, with 72 mandate holders. In March 2014, three new mandates were added. Special Procedures experts work on a voluntary basis; they are not UN staff and do not receive a salary for their work. They are independent from any government or organization and serve in their individual capacity. Learn more: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/SP/Pages/Welcomepage.aspx
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2014 World Press Freedom Day: Free media reinforces the post-2015 goals

On the occasion of the 2014 World Press Freedom Day, UN experts* underscored the freedom of the press. They also addressed the lack in the promotion and protection of the rights to freedom of expression and information, freedom of peaceful assembly, freedom of association and public participation in some countries.

Reiterating the Vienna Declaration and that all human rights are universal, indivisible, and interdependent, the experts underlined the fact that the rights to freedom of expression and information, freedom of peaceful assembly, freedom of association, and public participation are essential for achieving the realization of all human rights for all, and related development goals. Decision-making, including that related to sustainable development, must be democratic, transparent and participatory.

The UN experts expressed concern at the many attacks on journalists and human rights defenders, including members of civil society organisations, and those demanding good governance and governmental accountability.

They also pointed to the fact that the full recognition ofthe rights to freedom of expression and information, freedom of peaceful assembly, freedom of association, and public participation contributes to the full achievement of the millennium development goals.

The experts recalled the need to work towards more inclusive political processes, genuine participation by all in all countries, ensuring freedom of the media to play its role, and guaranteeing the right of the public to have access to information. They also emphasized the importance of the environmental impact assessments .

The experts highlighted the Report of the High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, which recommended adoption of a governance goal, including the protection of access to information, free media and protection of civic space. They also noted the discussions in the GA Open Working Group and the recognition in Focus Area 19 of the need for rule of law and capable institutions. They also recalled earlier contributions of special procedures to the Post-2015 Development Agenda .

On the occasion of the 2014 World Press Freedom Day, the UN independent experts called upon all States to:

Rights to freedom of expression and information

  • Ensure that all undue restrictions to the free flow of information and discourse relating to the realisation of development issues are eliminated, in particular, measures such as censorship, banning, blocking, and other obstruction to the dissemination of related information by the media, including through new information technologies;
  • Refrain from influencing the content and means of dissemination of development-related information by the media through financial and other means;
  • Publish comprehensive, reliable, accurate and accessible information related to the development agenda, including information necessary for individuals to exercise their rights; and information about available services and supplies, budgets, expenditures, revenues or aid policies;
  • Ensure that all obstacles preventing people from accessing information on development matters are removed and access to information is facilitated by simple and effective processes;
  • Ensure that information and data related to development issues are collected on a regular basis, that they are maintained in an organised and systematic manner and are disaggregated to address particular needs of groups who are marginalised, vulnerable or discriminated against;
  • Ensure that legal, regulatory and public policy frameworks for the media, including digital technologies, guarantee their independence, diversity and pluralism, and thus, allow for independent investigation and reporting on issues relating to development and poverty alleviation;
  • Adopt comprehensive national laws, regulations and policies on the rights to freedom of expression and information in accordance with international and regional norms and standards.  States should also ensure that public authorities at all levels, and private bodies carrying public functions, proactively inform the population about development-related issues, particularly those related to education, environment, health, water and sanitation, and poverty reduction;

Rights to freedom of association and peaceful assembly

  • Refrain from preventing individuals and groups from expressing dissenting views regarding development issues and facilitate access of civil society organisations – registered and unregistered – to financial and other resources, including from foreign or international sources, without prior authorisation or other undue impediments;
  • Remove other undue restrictions on civil society organisations, so that they can effectively take part in democratic process, and support their efforts to full realisation of sustainable development;
  • Ensure that a safe and enabling environment is created for individuals and groups so they can exercise their right to assemble peacefully and associate freely to voice their opinions, concerns and demands relating to development issues, individually and collectively, in conformity with international human rights obligations and standards;

Right to public participation

  • Guarantee the active, free and meaningful participation of individuals, communities and groups representing them in development decision-making processes – at international, national, regional and local levels;
  • Establish development indicators and benchmarks and ensure that they are used in monitoring  States’ progress towards the full realisation of the development agenda;
  • Ensure that consultation processes are not merely superficial or limited to overall information sharing, but are conducted in good faith and provide real and meaningful opportunities to freely and actively influence decisions;
  • Ensure that human rights, social, cultural and environmental strategic and impact assessments relating to all development industries and sectors are conducted by independent and technically competent entities and are produced in a manner that is understandable to affected individuals and communities.  Adequate safeguards and mechanisms of control over such assessments should be put in place.
  • Make sure that human rights, social, cultural and environmental strategic and impact assessments give due consideration to the concerns of all those affected and to holders of traditional knowledge and practices
  • Ensure that all related information, including any impact assessments, is communicated in an efficient manner, at the start of the decision-making and throughout the process at an appropriate time, through multiple channels and using culturally appropriate procedures;
  • Ensure that meetings are organized in the locality of those affected and in locations that can be easily accessed, two-way translations for local languages are provided and jargon or highly technical terms are avoided and appeal mechanisms are available for affected communities if they believe that their opinions were not fairly considered;
  • Undertake special efforts for genuine participation of individuals and groups who are vulnerable, marginalized, disadvantaged and discriminated against, in particular women, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons, indigenous people, members of minority groups, youth, persons with disabilities refugees and internally displaced people, non-nationals, including asylum seekers and migrant workers, in the decision-making processes.

Conducive environment

  • Take all necessary measures to ensure that all sectors of society – including women and other groups most at risk – are able to exercise their rights to freedom of expression and information, freedom of peaceful assembly, freedom of association, and public participation without discrimination.
  • Ensure a safe and enabling environment, in law and practice, for human rights defenders, including civil society organizations, which guarantees their independence and their right to carry out their work without fear of harassment, intimidation, stigmatization, reprisals, criminalisation or violence of any sort.

The experts concluded by emphasizing the fact that media organisations should recognise the role they can play in framing issues of public importance and helping to satisfy the public’s need for information in development issues, draw attention to and expose any violations of human rights in this area and provide platforms for inclusive public debate about related issues, reflecting a diversity of views and perspectives.

(*)The experts: Frank La Rue, Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression. Maina Kiai, Special Rapporteur on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association. Catarina de Albuquerque, Special Rapporteur on the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation. John Knox, Independent Expert on the issue of human rights obligations relating to the enjoyment of a safe, clean, healthy and sustainable environment. Anand Grover, Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. Margaret Sekaggya, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders. Alfred De Zayas, Independent expert on the promotion of a democratic and equitable international order. Gustavo Gallon, Independent Expert on the situation of human rights in Haiti. Mads Andenas, Chair-Rapporteur Working Group on Arbitrary Detention. Najat Maalla M’JID, Special Rapporteur on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography. Christof Heyns, Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions. Surya Subedi, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Cambodia. Mirjana Najcevska, Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent. Virginia Dandan, Independent Expert on human rights and international solidarity. Ms. Patricia Arias, Chair-Rapporteur Working Group on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination. Farida Shaheed, Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights. Magdalena Sepulveda, Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights. François Crépeau ,Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants. Tomas Ojea Quintana, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar. Raquel Rolnik Special Rapporteur on adequate housing as a component of the right to an adequate standard of living, and on the right to non-discrimination in this context. Marzuki Darusman, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. Pablo de Greiff, Special Rapporteur on the promotion of truth, justice, reparation and guarantees of non-recurrence. Gulnara Shahinian, Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of slavery, including its causes and its consequences. Sheila Keetharuth, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Eritrea. Richard Falk, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967. Juan Mendez, Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. Miklós Haraszti, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Belarus. Mashood Baderin, Independent Expert on the situation of human rights in the Sudan. Olivier de Schutter, Special Rapporteur on the right to food. Heiner Bielefeldt, Special Rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief. Chaloka Beyani, Special Rapporteur on the human rights of internally displaced persons.

Millennium Declaration, Resolution 55/2 of the UN General Assembly (GA) and Principles 10 and 17 of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development.

– list Post Rio+20 UN Sustainable Development (secr: EEB-unit: Global Policies and Sustainability)

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IISD:  Post-2015 Policy & Practice – Note Calendar

 http://post2015.iisd.org/post2015-update/2014-04-23/

 

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 DESA News: Renewing Focus on Sustainable Islands

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezPQO-Bs-3o#t=16

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World We Want 2015

 Dialogues on the Implementation of the Post-2015 Agenda: A Quick Primer

29 Apr 2014 | Addressing Inequalities: Article by tcallender@unicef.org

29 Apr 2014     [ read more ]

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QUESTION 2: How can the new sustainable development goals reflect child poverty?
Discussion by soshea@unicef.org

 

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Call for Proposals – 2nd Annual Internatio​nal Conference on Sustainabl​e Developmen​t Practice

Dear colleagues,
The Global Association of Master’s in Development Practice Programs (MDP), in collaboration with the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN), will hold the Second Annual International Conference on Sustainable Development Practice (ICSDP) on September 17-18, 2014 at Columbia University in New York City.
The Conference theme, Advancing Evidence-Based Solutions for the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Agenda, seeks proposals for practical solutions to address the complex challenges of sustainable development at local, regional, and global levels. The aim of the conference is to share and identify practical, evidence-based solutions, that can support the SDSN leadership in shaping the post-2015 agenda. Proposals are welcome across 12 SDSN thematic areas:
1. Macroeconomics, Population Dynamics, and Planetary Boundaries
2. Poverty Reduction and Peace-Building in Fragile Regions
3. Challenges of Social Inclusion: Gender, Inequalities, and Human Rights
4. Early Childhood Development, Education, and Transition to Work
5. Health for All
6. Low-Carbon Energy and Sustainable Industry
7. Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems
8. Forests, Oceans, Biodiversity, and Ecosystem Services
9. Sustainable Cities: Inclusive, Resilient, and Connected
10. Good Governance of Extractive and Land Resources
11. Global Governance and Norms for Sustainable Development
12. Redefining the Role of Business for Sustainable Development
We are accepting contributions from academia (faculty, scholars, researchers, and students), practitioners, NGOs, government agencies, international organizations, and private companies. A diversity of stakeholders and perspectives is desirable, as the conference hopes to mobilize the expertise of the scientific and technical communities in a wide rage of sectors. A peer review panel consisting of MDP academics and SDSN Affiliates (or the Scientific Committee) will select the best solutions from the submitted abstracts and papers to be presented at the conference.
Please submit abstracts using the form at http://events.ei.columbia.edu/sdp-conference-2014/Abstracts are due by May 30, 2014, and notifications of accepted abstracts will be sent by June 17, 2014. Upon acceptance, full papers should be submitted no later than June 30, 2014. For questions please write to ICSDP@globalmdp.org.
Best regards,
Guido Schmidt-Traub

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THE WORLD WE WANT

PGA Convenes Interactive Dialogue on Monitoring and Accountability Frameworks for Post-2015, Watch and Join the Conversation 29 Apr 2014 |

 

Addressing Inequalities: Article by tcallender@unicef.org

 

The post-2015 development agenda, to be launched by world leaders in September 2015, will have as overarching objectives the eradication of extreme poverty and a global pathway to sustainable development. One of the main experiences from the implementation of the Millennium Goals agenda has been that implementing a transformative agenda will require, among others, not only a renewed global partnership for development but also a robust, inclu! sive and transparent monitoring and accountability framework.

Accountability for a universal agenda can be understood as the joint commitment of the global community to monitor, evaluate, share and discuss progress towards the implementation of the agreed goals. An accountability framework could allow each government and development actor to contribute to and benefit from a better global understanding of challenges and effective strategies. The concept of accountability extends beyond Governments and applies to all stakeholders being held accountable for their role in implementing a universal development agenda, within their respective governance frameworks and scope of responsibility.

To that end, the President of the UN General Assembly’s Office (PGA) is convening an “interactive dialogue” on the topic of “Elements for a Monitoring and Accountability Framework for the Post-2015 Development Agenda” on 1 May 2014 starting at 10:00 am Eastern Daylight Time.

The proceedings can be followed on livestream here:  http://webtv.un.org/

For more information, please visit the PGA website here

And don’t forget to engage in the online conversation about Participatory Monitoring and Accountability here or click the link immediately below.

www.worldwewant2015.org/accountability2015

 

Please direct any questions to Tricia Callender, Manager of the Participatory Monitoring and Accountability Online Space at tcallender@unicef.org

29 Apr 2014     [ read more ]

 

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Campaign logo

Our World. Our Future. Our Goals.

Campaign for People’s Goals for Sustainable Development

- See more at: http://peoplesgoals.org/a-global-partnership-of-solidarity-or-global-partnership-for-wealth/#sthash.bWQLtQIQ.dpuf

http://peoplesgoals.org/a-global-partnership-of-solidarity-or-global-partnership-for-wealth/

 

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New Message2nd Round of UNDG Consultati​on on Participat​ion and Accountabi​lity Underway Now! Submit your solutions for “Participa​tion” “Accountab​ility” and the Post-2015 Agenda

 

Dear AINA Members,

In the pursuit of a comprehensive and effective post-2015 agenda, we are building on the first round of UNDG consultations to address the issue of “Participatory Monitoring for Accountability”–a development methodology that encompasses a wider range of voices and “bottom-up” approaches for addressing inequality and eradicating poverty in the Post-2015 agenda.

This consultation seeks to learn from your experience–as people keenly concerned with inequality–about what has worked in your context and experience about including:

1. Inclusion of traditionally marginalized peoples in any post-2015 strategy. How best to include participatory approaches in the post-2015 agenda.

2. How to ensure that governments keep their promises (particularly with respect to making sure that more people have an opportunity to participate and thrive) when the post-2015 agenda is finally implemented.

3. Share your examples of successful projects that have implemented a participatory approach, including accountability measures–AND your suggestions for how to scale up your projects to national and international levels.

The consultation entitled, “Participatory Monitoring for Accountability” started14 April 2014 and ends on 2 May 2014, which can be found on the site dedicated to this initiative:

www.worldwewant2015.org/accountability2015

Expert moderators include Neva Frecheville of the Catholic Aid Agency for Development (CAFOD) and Fabio Palacio of All Together in Dignity, Fourth World (ATD). Both moderators and their organizations are strong advocates of the idea that participatory approaches are necessary to truly eradicate poverty. We are delighted to have them on board and they are eager to engage with the AINA community regarding your ideas concerning “participation” and “inclusion.”

We hope that you will participate and that, as a result, we are able to learn from your experiences and implement those lessons learned into a powerful and inclusive post-2015 agenda.

Results of the consultation will be fed into official Open Working Group post-2015 debates as well as other post-2015 policy avenues.

If you have any questions about the consultation, please do not hesitate to contact me, Tricia Callender, Participatory Monitoring for Accountability Consultation Manager at tcallender@unicef.org

Best,

Tricia Callender

www.worldwewant2015.org/accountability2015

This message was sent by: World We Want 2015, 304 East 45th Street, New York, NY 10017

 

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Women’s rights country by country – interactive Article by tcallender@unicef.org

“…Which countries have laws preventing violence? Which legislate for gender equality? And which countries allow abortion? Using World Bank and UN data we offer a snapshot of women’s rights across the globe. Select a region and hover over a country to see how it has legislated for violence, harassment, abortion, property and employment rights, discrimination and equality. Click on a country to tweet a message on the figures. Country data can be viewed in relation to its population size and those of its neighbouring states…”

11 Feb 2014 [ read more ]

 

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Guide-Lines of the 2015-Post Agenda…

The African Youth Charter, endorsed in July 2006, provides guidance for youth development policies and programmes at the national level.It is t hrough the Charter that African governments committed to undertaking critical actions to improve the status of young people in their countries. As of today, only 32 states have ratified the Charter. There is need for more governments to ratify the charter as it will clearly create a platform for youth dialogue and intersection with the national process and as such, create a fora where issues affecting the youth are addressed in a manner that gets with the national development process.The problem of youth employment is more complex in Africa than any other part of the world. Slow-growing economies have been unable to generate enough job opportunities to absorb the large number of young people graduating every year. There is an urgent need for African youth to play a major role in advocating for the domesticating the Charter through the Youth Decade Plan of Action. Youthful creativity and innovation is a source of development. The youth as a social category are always active in supporting themselves and their governments to build better communities. This clearly shows that young people are concerned with development and achievement of the MDGs. By investing and harnessing young people’s energy, creativity and innovations, the Africa region stands to benefit in the accelerating the achievements of the MDGs With the few opportunities and little resources they have, African youth mobilize themselves to support development priorities and to motivate others to do the same. A lot of positive of change have been made at the national and local level through the innovative actions by the young volunteers. Their involvement is a source of new and fresh ideas and combines their high energy level with the professional skills and experience from the older generation to create new levels of enthusiasm and productivity in achieving sustainable development.

http://worldviewmission.nl/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Post-2015-Guidelines-for-Country-Consultations-July-2012.pdf
http://worldviewmission.nl/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/WM-UN-My-World-2-A-Global-survey-for-citizens1.pdf
http://www.worldwewant2015.org/post2015hlp

 

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The Major Groups and Stakeholders Branch United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) P.O. 30552 Nairobi, Kenya
http://www.unep.org/civil_society/

 

Here, the list of those to represent the CSO community with UNEP for the coming two years 2013-2015

best,

Sena ALOUKA Executive Director Jeunes Volontaires pour l’Environnement 131, rue Ofé, Tokoin Casablanca Box 8823, Lomé, Togo Tel.+228-22200112, Cel.+228-90216740 www.jve-international.org

The Major Groups and Stakeholders Branch United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) P.O. 30552 Nairobi, Kenya
http://www.unep.org/civil_society/

 

From: UNEP Civil Society

 

Subject: Endorsement of new members of the MGFC

 

Children   & Youth Nhat-Tan   Nguyen nhattan.nguyen@hotmail.com World   Organization of the Scout Movement
Children   & Youth Kehkashan   Basu kehkashanbasu@gmail.com TakingITGlobal
Indigenous   peoples and their communities Lucy   Muleinkei mulenkei@gmail.com IIN
Indigenous   peoples and their communities Diego   Escobar   Guzman diego@coica.   org.ec,   escobar.guzman@gmail.com COICA
Business   and Industry Birgit   Engelhardt engelhardt@VCI.de VCI
Business   and Industry Norine   Kennedy nkennedy@uscib.org USCIB
Farmers James Cole elocfarms@yahoo.com The   International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM)*
Farmers Calvin   James calvin.james@cnirdregional.org    calvin.j.james@live.com Caribbean   Network for Integrated Rural Development*
Local   Authorities Outstanding   from  nrg4sd nrg4sd
Local   Authorities Yunus   Arikan yunus.arikan@iclei.org ICLEI
Workers   and Trade Unions Anabella   Rosemberg anabella.rosemberg@ituc-csi.org ITUC
Workers   and Trade Unions Yahya   Msangi yahya.msangi@ituc-africa.org ITUC   Africa
Women Caroline   Usikpedo-Omoniye nigerdeltawomen@gmail.com Niger   Delta Movement
Women Isis   Alvarez isis.alvarez@globalforestcoalition.org Global   Forest Coalition
Non-Governmental   Organizations Marcos   Orellana morellana@ciel.org Centre of   International Environmental Law (CIEL)
Non-Governmental   Organizations Habiba Al   Marashi eeg@emirates.net.ae Emirates   Environmental Group (EEG)
Scientific   and technological Community Peter   Bates peter.bates@icsu.org International   Council for Science (ICSU)
Scientific   and technological Community Mohamed   Abdel Raouf raouf@grc.ae,   mhdraouf@yahoo.com Environment   Research, Gulf Research Center (GRC)

– You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Worldview Mission Country Coordinators” group.

To post to this group, send email to worldview-mission-country-coordinators@googlegroups.com.  

 

Visit this group at http://groups.google.com/group/worldview-mission-country-coordinators?hl=en-US.

 

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/groups/opt_out.  

 

—————————————————————————————————

 

TO UN DESA NGO MAJOR GROUP — FYI

———- Forwarded message ———- From: Paul Quintos <pquintos@iboninternational.org> Date: Tue, Apr 8, 2014 at 9:05 PM Subject: A Global Partnership of Solidarity or Global Partnerships for Wealth? To:
Please circulate widely….
Dear All,
Today there will be a Thematic Debate on “The role of partnerships in the implementation of the Post-2015 Development Agenda” organized by the Office of the President of the UN General Assembly.
In a statement released yesterday, the Campaign for Peoples Goals for Sustainable Development along with other civil society groups and social movements warn that “The privileging of the private sector’s role in partnerships poses the danger of corporations and their lobby-groups gaining unchecked influence over the agenda-setting and political decision-making by governments. If left unmanaged and unsupervised, these partnerships are likely to evolve to further serve corporate interests resulting in the privatization of public services to the detriment of the peoples’ right to basic services and universal social protection. Indeed it is strange to think that while governments deliberate over a new set of “sustainable development goals”, other negotiations are taking place that will further cement the ‘sovereign rights’ of corporations over state jurisdictions .” If you want to sign-on to this statement, please send your organization’s name and country to secretariat@peoplesgoals.org
-- 
Paul Quintos
IBON International
3rd Flr., IBON Center
114 Timog Avenue,
Quezon City 1103
Philippines
Telefax: +63 2 9276981

Skype ID: paul.quintos
Websites: iboninternational.org
peoplesgoals.org

–  You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “NGO MG Members for UNGA 2012-2013″ group. To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to ngo-mg-unga-2012+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com. For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.


–  Jeffery Huffines NGO Major Group Organizing Partner CIVICUS UN Representative (NY) Cell: +1 646-707-1060 Email: jeffery.huffines@civicus.org Skype: jefferyvhuffines CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation PO BOX 933, Southdale 2135, JHB, South Africa www.civicus.org
Follow threats and take action to protect civil society – join Civil Society Watch at www.cswatch.org

 

Sign on Statement.Global Partnership.final 2014Apr8

 

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2nd Round of UNDG Consultation on Participation and Accountability Underway Now! Submit your ideas for inclusion in the Post-2015 Agenda

 

22 Apr 2014 | Addressing Inequalities: Article by tcallender@unicef.org

 

Dear AINA Members,

In the pursuit of a comprehensive and effective post-2015 agenda, we are building on the first round of UNDG consultations to address the issue of “Participatory Monitoring and Accountability”–a development methodology that encompasses a wider range of voices and “bottom-up” approaches for addressing inequality and eradicating poverty in the Post-2015 agenda.

This consultation seeks to learn from your experience–as people keenly concerned with inequality–about what has worked in your context and experience about including:

1. Inclusion of traditionally marginalized peoples in any post-2015 strategy. How best to include participatory approaches in the post-2015 agenda.

2. How to ensure that governments keep their promises (particularly with respect to making sure that more people have an opportunity to participate and thrive) when the post-2015 agenda is finally implemented.

3. Share your examples of successful projects that have implemented a participatory approach, including accountability measures–AND your suggestions for how to scale up your projects to national and international levels.

The consultation can be found here Participatory Monitoring and Accountability starting 14 April 2014, which can be found on the site dedicated to this initiative:

www.worldwewant2015.org/accountability2015

Expert moderators include Neva Frecheville of the Catholic Aid Agency for Development (CAFOD) and Fabio Palacio of All Together in Dignity, Fourth World (ATD). Both moderators and their organizations are strong advocates of the idea that participatory approaches are necessary to truly eradicate poverty. We are delighted to have them on board and they are eager to engage with the AINA community regarding your ideas concerning “participation” and “inclusion.”

We hope that you will participate and that, as a result, we are able to learn from your experiences and then implement those lessons learned into a powerful and inclusive post-2015 agenda.

Results of the consultation will be fed into official Open Working Group post-2015 debates as well as other post-2015 policy avenues.

If you have any questions about the consultation, please do not hesitate to contact me, Tricia Callender, Participatory Monitoring and Accountability Consultation Manager at tcallender@unicef.org

Best,

Tricia Callender

www.worldwewant2015.org/accountability2015

22 Apr 2014     [ read more ]

————————————————————————————————

 

Dear  AINA  Members,

The continuation of an inclusive dialogue on Post-2015 is a key mandate given to the UN by its Members States as well as UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

As the Post-2015 Development Agenda process moves into its next phase, we seek to build on the outcomes of the first round of consultations (held in 2012-2013), to ensure the inclusion of a wider range of voices and approaches in the Post-2015 Development Agenda process.

Themes that have consistently emerged from the consultations and Post-2015 discussions—particularly in previous AINA discussions—are the concepts of “inclusion” and “participation” and the importance of including previous marginalized voices in the design, implementation, monitoring and accountability mechanisms for development processes.

To that end, UNICEF, UN Women and UNDP—with support from the Governments of Canada, Peru and the Republic of Korea are co-organizing a global thematic consultation on Participatory Monitoring for Accountability—and how best to include participatory approaches in the Post-2015 Development Agenda.

Firstly, we are conducting an e-discussion on the topic of Participatory Monitoring for Accountability starting 14 April 2014, which can be found on the site dedicated to this initiative: www.worldwewant2015.org/accountability2015

The online consultation will run from 14 April -2 May 2014 focused on three questions specific to participation in the Post-2015 Agenda. We strongly encourage your participation and we invite you to make your voice heard!

Secondly, another key part of the consultation will be the collection of good practices and lessons learned from participatory approaches across the globe.

Individuals, academics, policy experts, and organizations are invited to submit proposals of either Case Studies or Methodologies in relation to Participatory Monitoring approaches. Please see here for information on paper proposal submission:  http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/432477.

Please note we are seeking practical examples (not theoretical papers) of methods that have be implemented successfully. Additionally, only paper proposals that follow the given template will be considered.

(Link to template here: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/432470).

Please note the deadline for submissions will be 2 May and we are not able to offer extensions on this.   Again, we are anxious to hear and learn from your direct experiences with participation and seek your guidance on how we include it in the Post-2015 agenda.

The outcomes of the consultation will be fed into Open Working Group for Sustainable Development Goals decision-making discussions, the Secretary-General’s synthesis report and other key Post-2015 key policy discussions and processes.

We hope that you are able to participate in these opportunities and we look forward to learning from you and your experience with participation as an effective development approach. Please visit www.worldwewant2015.org/accountability2015

for more information or feel free to contact me, Tricia Callender, Consultation Manager at tcallender@unicef.org

Best.
Tricia Callender
UNICEF Consultation Manager
tcallender@unicef.org

This message was sent by: World We Want 2015, 304 East 45th Street, New York, NY 10017

 

————————————————————————————————

Dear All,

The continuation of an inclusive dialogue on Post-2015 is a key
mandate given to the UN by its Members States as well as UN
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. As the Post-2015 Development Agenda
process moves into its next phase, we seek to build on the outcomes of
the first round of consultations (held in 2012-2013), to ensure the
inclusion of a wider range of voices and approaches in the Post-2015
Development Agenda process.

Themes that have consistently emerged from the consultations and
Post-2015 discussions–particularly in previous AINA discussions–are
the concepts of “inclusion” and “participation” and the importance of
including previous marginalized voices in the design, implementation,
monitoring and accountability mechanisms for development processes.

To that end, UNICEF, UN Women and UNDP–with support from the
Governments of Canada, Peru and the Republic of Korea are
co-organizing a global thematic consultation on Participatory
Monitoring for Accountability–and how best to include participatory
approaches in the Post-2015 Development Agenda.

Firstly, we are conducting an e-discussion on the topic of
Participatory Monitoring for Accountability starting 14 April 2014,
which can be found on the site dedicated to this initiative:
www.worldwewant2015.org/accountability2015

The online consultation will run from 14 April -2 May 2014 focused on
three questions specific to participation in the Post-2015 Agenda. We
strongly encourage your participation and we invite you to make your
voice heard!

Secondly, another key part of the consultation will be the collection
of good practices and lessons learned from participatory approaches
across the globe.
Individuals, academics, policy experts, and organizations are invited
to submit proposals of either Case Studies or Methodologies in
relation to Participatory Monitoring approaches. Please see here for
information on paper proposal submission:
http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/432477.  Please note we are
seeking practical examples (not theoretical papers) of methods that
have be implemented successfully. Additionally, only paper proposals
that follow the given template will be considered. (Link to template
here: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/432470).  Please note the
deadline for submissions will be 2 May and we are not able to offer
extensions on this.   Again, we are anxious to hear and learn from
your direct experiences with participation and seek your guidance on
how we include it in the Post-2015 agenda.

The outcomes of the consultation will be fed into Open Working Group
for Sustainable Development Goals decision-making discussions, the
Secretary-General’s synthesis report and other key Post-2015 key
policy discussions and processes.

We hope that you are able to participate in these opportunities and we
look forward to learning from you and your experience with
participation as an effective development approach. Please visit
www.worldwewant2015.org/accountability2015 for more information or
feel free to contact me, Tricia Callender, Consultation Manager at
tcallender@unicef.org

Best.
Tricia Callender
UNICEF Consultation Manager
tcallender@unicef.org

 

————————————————————————————————

Dear friends and colleagues,


This is to let you all know that the final agenda for the International Symposium on the Sustainable Development Goals and the Post 2015 Agenda is now available @ 
www.sdgp2015.com
Registration is also now open in addition to those wanting to submit papers and abstracts. The main themes will continue to be:
1.      Theme 1 Leave No One Behind after 2015: Women’s empowerment, indigenous economic development, ending extreme poverty, access to opportunity. 2.      Theme 2 Forging A New Global Partnership: Strengthening institutions, developing transformative partnerships between government, business and civil society, forging partnerships with foundations and philanthropic organisations and business engagement. 3.      Theme 3 Transforming Economies for Jobs and Inclusive growth: Harnessing innovation and technology, private sector development finance, diversification of economies with inclusive opportunity for all, fostering sustainable consumption and production. 4.      Theme 4 Put Sustainable Development At The Core. Social Impact and Development – integration of social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability, measuring, reporting and integrating standards, addressing issues of the workforce and the concept of a “living wage”, the impact of business and government action.
Make sure you put it in your diaries!
Matthew Tukaki, Chair of the SDGP International Advisory Board
Matthew Tukaki Chair, CSI and Chief Entrepreneur of EntreHub and The Sustain Group


E: 
matthew.tukaki@sustaingroup.net E:  matthew.tukaki@entrehub.org P:  +61 415 093 137 (SG) P:  +61 404 245 046 (EH) W:  www.entrehub.org W: www.entrehub.org
F:  Like us on Facebook L:  Join us on LinkedIn T:  Follow us on Twitter

  

—————————————————————————————————

Dear All,

 A Global Partnershi​p of Solidarity or Global Partnershi​ps for Wealth?

Today there will be a Thematic Debate on “The role of partnerships in the implementation of the Post-2015 Development Agenda” organized by the Office of the President of the UN General Assembly.

In a statement released yesterday, the Campaign for Peoples Goals for Sustainable Development along with other civil society groups and social movements warn that “The privileging of the private sector’s role in partnerships poses the danger of corporations and their lobby-groups gaining unchecked influence over the agenda-setting and political decision-making by Governements.

If left unmanaged and unsupervised, these partnerships are likely to evolve to further serve corporate interests resulting in the privatization of public services to the detriment of the peoples’ right to basic services and universal social protection. Indeed it is strange to think that while governments deliberate over a new set of “sustainable development goals”, other negotiations are taking place that will further cement the ‘sovereign rights’ of corporations over state jurisdictions .”

If you want to sign-on to this statement, please send your organization’s name and country to secretariat@peoplesgoals.org

Paul Quintos
IBON International
3rd Flr., IBON Center
114 Timog Avenue,
Quezon City 1103
Philippines
Telefax: +63 2 9276981

Skype ID: paul.quintos
Websites: iboninternational.org
peoplesgoals.org


Jeffery Huffines
NGO Major Group Organizing Partner
CIVICUS UN Representative (NY)
Cell: +1 646-707-1060
Email: jeffery.huffines@civicus.org
Skype: jefferyvhuffines

CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation

PO BOX 933, Southdale 2135, JHB, South Africa
www.civicus.org

Follow threats and take action to protect civil society – join Civil Society Watch at www.cswatch.org

  Statement.Global Partnership.final 2014Apr8

———————————————————————————————–

 

Dear All,

IFAD and the post-2015 global development agenda

As the International Fund for Agricultural Development looks beyond the Millennium Development Goals, whose target date is fast approaching, the Fund views the post-2015 global development framework as a unique opportunity to focus new policies, investments, and partnerships on rural transformation. Achieving a sustainable future for all requires that poor rural people be recognized as key actors and partners.

 

What will the world look like in 20 years?

We want a world where extreme poverty has been eradicated, all women and men are well nourished, benefits from growth are equitably distributed, decent job opportunities are available to everyone, natural resources are sustainably managed, and temperature increases resulting from climate change are manageable.

This future is within our collective reach. However, it will require a profound change of course in policy processes, public and private investments and development practices – giving priority to social, economic and political inclusion, equality and equity, sustainability, rights and good governance.

 

Rural inclusion and transformation are key

A rural transformation leading to sustainable development would bring universal benefits and so requires integration across the entire post-2015 agenda. Dynamic and inclusive rural development plays a pivotal role in food and nutrition security, inclusive growth and poverty eradication in countries at all levels of development. For instance, sustainable smallholder agriculture provides a powerful vehicle to deliver multiple benefits across all of the dimensions of sustainable development (economic, social and environment) for people no matter where they live. It is not peripheral, but rather at the very nexus of sustainable, inclusive development.

Designing goals, targets and indicators for rural inclusion and to unlock the potential of the rural sectors can have a major catalytic impact on the entire post-2015 development agenda. That means targets and indicators for access to assets and services that build the capacity of rural women, men, and youth to lead the transformation of the rural space and to become competitive in today’s rural and urban markets.

 

IFAD’s vision

IFAD sees the post-2015 agenda as an opportunity to recognize the need for rural transformation in the quest for sustainable development and poverty eradication by:

    •  Redressing rural-urban inequalities to promote inclusive job growth and to achieve poverty eradication in rural areas.
    •  Promoting the economic and social empowerment of poor rural women and men, so that they can build stronger livelihoods, both driving and benefiting from growth in the rural economy.
    •  Increasing agricultural productivity sustainably and strengthening agricultural markets, so as to achieve food security and nutrition for all.
    •  Strengthening the resilience and risk management capacity of smallholder farmers and rural households, particularly with respect to climate change.
Ibrahim SIDIBE
Coordinator IDAR – Concil in Mali

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Post-2015: Global Survey on the Future of United Nations – The UN we Want for the World we Want

Dear Friends,

As you know, the United Nations touches a very substantial proportion of the global population as beneficiaries,
contributors, and employees. Every two years the Ralph Bunche Institute’s FUNDS project and Dalberg Research
undertake a global survey of the UN’s contribution to development.
The 2014 Global Survey has already received over 2000 responses. We invite others to take part in this survey  on the
future of the United Nations development system. We will be sharing the findings of the survey with all the participants.

You will find below the link to the questionnaire (in several languages). The questionnaire

takes approximately 10 minutes to complete.

English: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GlobalUNSurvey2014

Spanish: https://es.surveymonkey.com/s/2014_FutureUN_Survey_spanish

French: https://fr.surveymonkey.com/s/2014_FutureUN_Survey

Arabic: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2014_FutureUN_Survey_arabic

Chinese: https://zh.surveymonkey.com/s/2014_FutureUN_Survey_chinese

Thank you very much.

Tom Weiss, Stephen Browne and Vikas Nath

Vikas Nath Associate Director Future UN Development System (FUNDS) Project www.FutureUN.org

 

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Online course

 

http://cifalscotland.org/index.php/programmes/61-forthcoming-programmes/243-introduction-to-the-post-2015-proces

 

5 May 2014 – 1 June 2014

Online Course: Introduction to the Post-2015 Development Agenda

Places are limited, so register now to secure your space

Course Format   online/internet based

Course Dates    5 May 2014 – 1 June 2014

Duration of course 4 weeks

Contact: e-learning@cifalscotland.org

Stakeholder Forum has partnered with CIFAL Scotland to offer a unique e-learning opportunity which will enhance the capacity of participants to engage with the international Post-2015 process to design and agree a set of Sustainable Development Goals. Conducted through the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) Virtual Learning Platform, participants will be provided with the essential knowledge needed to engage with the international process on the Post-2015 Development Agenda.

 

The four week course will include the following modules:   Module 1 Introducing the Post-2015 Development Agenda and the SDGs   Module 2 Incentivising and measuring development progress with goals, targets and indicators   Module 3 The Post-2015 processes: Key milestones and opportunities to participate

For more details and to register, please click here.                                                

 

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QUESTION 1: What importance should child poverty be given in the post-2015 development goals? Discussion by soshea@unicef.org

Guiding questions for further consideration:

  1. How important is child poverty to eradicate overall poverty, transform economies and achieve sustainable development?
  2. What are main causes and consequences of child poverty? What barriers prevent children from accessing the high quality services they need to develop and thrive?
  3. How can eradicating child poverty contribute to reduce inequalities and accelerate progress towards other development goals?

23 Mar 2014 [ read more ]

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LIVE STREAM POST-2015 EVENT — FOR PROGRAMME SEE ATTACHED

The Policy and Strategy Group of the WorldWeWant2015.org web platform will provide the live streaming of “The Privatization of the Post-2015 Development Agenda:

Issues and Challenges in Partnerships with the ‘Private Sector’” on the web platform for the global conversations on Post 2015 and the SDGs: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/peoplesvoices

The WorldWeWant2015.org is a platform co-created by the United Nations and civil society to amplify people’s voices in the process of building a global agenda for sustainable development. The Policy and Strategy Group invites interested members of civil society and the UN to join our weekly meetings on partnerships and collaborations in disseminating the messages of Post 2015 and the SDGs.

For more information, contact:http://www.worldwewant2015.org/post2015-contactus

“The Privatization of the Post-2015 Development Agenda Issues and Challenges in Partnerships with the ‘Private Sector’”

8 April 2014,  1:15 – 2:45 PM 2nd Floor Conference Room, UN Church Center

“Partnerships” for sustainable development are increasingly being promoted as a major, if not the primary, enabler for the implementation of the successor international sustainable development goals to replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015. However, a growing number of civil society groups warn against a partnerships approach that places primary emphasis on enticing private sector partiipation and investments as this risks reinforcing the corporate capture of the post-2015 agenda.

This one-and-a-half hour Public Forum seeks to provide critical perspectives on the major issues and challenges associated with partnerships with the “private sector” for sustainable development.

The event is co-organized by Bread for the World, the Campaign for People’s Goals, Center for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, General Board of Church and Society-UMC, Global Policy Forum, IBON International, Misereor, Social Watch and Third World Network.

For more details, please contact the following:

Roberto Bissio (Social Watch) rbissio@item.org.uy

Bhumika Muchhala (TWN) <bhumika.muchhala@gmail.com>

Jens Martens (GPF)  <jensmartens@globalpolicy.org>

Paul Quintos (IBON)  secretariat@peoplesgoals.org

 

Paul Quintos

IBON International

3rd Flr., IBON Center

114 Timog Avenue,

Quezon City 1103

Philippines

Telefax: +63 2 9276981

Skype ID: paul.quintos

Websites: iboninternational.org

peoplesgoals.org

 

Jeffery Huffines NGO Major Group Organizing Partner CIVICUS UN Representative (NY) Cell: +1 646-707-1060 Email: jeffery.huffines@civicus.org Skype: jefferyvhuffines

CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation PO BOX 933, Southdale 2135, JHB, South Africa www.civicus.org

Follow threats and take action to protect civil society – join Civil Society Watch at www.cswatch.org

 

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From: Ann Kobia <kobiamakena@gmail.com> Date: Tue, Apr 1, 2014 at 8:32 AM Subject: PACJA updates Fw: Keynote Address by President of Liberia/Chair of HLC To: pacja-updates <pacja-updates@googlegroups.com>


– Dear Colleagues,
Find herewith the link of the  keynote address made by H.E. Madame Sirleaf on the Common African  Position (CAP) at the recently concluded Conference of Ministers of  Economy and Finance.
The Chair highlighted some of the following points in her speech:
  • African regional Post-2015 process -  multiple regional and sub-regional consultations and meeting of the  Sherpas held to articulate on the CAP;
  • How the High-Level Committee (HLC) was set up on May 2013 during the 21st AU Summit and the countries representing the HLC;
  • How the Summit gave the responsibility of further refining the CAP  to the HLC and how the Summit requested the AUC, RECs, relevant  stakeholders to engage member states and work with the PRC (Country  Ambassadors to the AU) and African group in New York to ensure that the  CAP fed into the Post-2015 development agenda;
  • The work of the HLC after its formulation, how the roadmap from May  2013 Summit onwards was designed by AUC and Liberia Chair Office and how this roadmap was approved on September 2013 on the margins of UNGA  (United Nations General Assembly);
  • The establishment of the technical working group at UNGA comprising  of UNECA, UNFPA, NEPAD, UNDP Regional Bureau and AfDP to refine the  draft CAP;
  • The technical working group met with the Sherpas  several times to incorporate comments from various stakeholders and  build consensus around priority areas of the CAP;
  • The revised CAP was thus, presented to the Heads of State and  Government at the January AU Summit 2014 and was adopted with Peace and  Security being added as a pillar rather than an enabler;
  • At the end of February 2014 the HLC endorsed the changes made and further discussed strategy for advocacy around the CAP.
  • The Chair highlighted that the CAP aims at re-orienting the  development paradigm away from externally-driven towards  domestically-inspired and funded initiatives;
  • She further  highlighted as being incorporated in the CAP some major points such as – good governance, ownership and participation by Africans, service  delivery on Health & Education, decent jobs and strengthened  resilience to external shocks, harnessing science, technology and  innovation, sustainable development agenda for Africa on the basis of  Common but Differentiated Responsibilities, addressing inequalities,  resource mobilization and innovative financing and inclusive  development;
  • She moved on to say that now the CAP has been developed, next step would be advocacy, negotiations and forging alliances;
  • She also said the 19 areas of focus identified by the UN Open Working Group (OWG) on the SDGs are mostly in line with African priorities. However,  she stressed the need to forge ahead with advocacy and negotiations to  ensure that African voice is not only heard but well taken and reflected in the Post-2015 Development Agenda.
  • She concluded by saying ‘The people of Africa have spoken. We have listened and now is the time for action’.
Indeed it is. Now it’s the time for action! Please also find attached the  Focus Area Document identified by the UN for your information.
Best,
Eskedar
Consultant, Post-2015 Save the Children

 

A  global environment free from the threat of global warming with sustainable development,equity and justice for all.

 

– — Thank you for posting to the Pan African Climate Justice Alliance member’s mailing list.Please note that you have posted to a moderated email list.  In  conformity with Pan African Climate Justice Alliance ZERO TOLERANCE SPAM policy, any posts to this mailing list will be held for moderation. If your intention was to contact the Pan African Climate Justice Alliance Secretariat, please use the email address [Info@pacja.org]. Thank you for your co-operation and understanding and supporting  our Vision, “A global environment free from the threat of global warming with sustainable development equity and justice to all”

— You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “PACJA Updates” group. To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to pacja-updates+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

George Ndungu,
Secretary for International Affairs and Kenya Chairperson.
Organisation of African Youth (www.oayouth.org)
African Youth Representative for Rio+20.
Convener: African Youth Conference on Post-2015 Development Agenda

Focus areas document_OWG SDGs_21 February 2014 (1) (1).pdf

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UN-NGLS releases Issue #5 of The 2015 Post, e-magazine on post-2015

 

Dear colleagues ,


UN-NGLS has just released Issue #5 of the 2015 Post, our monthly interactive e-magazine on the post-2015 development agenda. The March issue includes updates on the Open Working Group (OWG) on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the Intergovernmental Committee of Experts on Sustainable Development Financing (ICESDF), the 58th session of the Commission on the Status of Women, and the events hosted by the President of the General Assembly; perspectives from civil society; and an expanded list of upcoming post-2015 events.
To view Issue #5 of The 2015 Post, please click here.

To subscribe to the UN-NGLS listserv, please click here
Thanks and best regards,
Kathryn
Kathryn (Katie) Tobin
Associate Communications Officer
United Nations Non-Governmental Liaison Service (UN-NGLS)
Twitter: @unngls
Sign up for the UN-NGLS email listserv here

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  (AYICC) Fwd: [Beyond 2015:270] Introducin​g the new Beyond 2015 Executive Committee

Dear Beyond 2015

 

We are pleased to share with you the results of the recent selection process of the new Beyond 2015 Executive Committee. We hope that all organisations participating in Beyond 2015 will give their full support to the organisations which make up the new Committee, notably:

Organisation of African Youth (Kenya)

Further details of the selection process can be found attached.

Many thanks to all organisations who applied, and indeed to all of those who voted and participated in the outreach call!

Best regards
Leo Williams
International Coordinator
Beyond 2015

 

 

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Fwd: FINAL COMMUNIQUE ON COMMON AFRICAN POSITION – POST 2015 DEVELOPMEN​T AGENDA

Dear Colleagues,

Kindly find attached the final communiqué (English/French) on the Common African Position on Post 2015 Development Agenda signed on Friday 28 February 2014 in N’Djamena, Republic of Chad,  by the Heads of States, Sherpas of the High Level Committee on the Post 2015 Development Agenda.

THANKS

Tankou Azza Esther

Senior Editorial Officer | Information and Communication Directorate | African Union Commission

Tel: (251) 11 551 77 00 | Fax: (251) 11 551 78 44 | E-mail: YambouE@africa-union.org | Web:www.au.int

Addis Ababa | Ethiopia

Directorate of Information and Communication

African Union Commission

 

 English communicae            /        French Communicae

 

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Dear Beyond 2015 Exec Com, new and old

Beyond 2015 is in the process of recruiting an Advocacy Coordinator, to be based in New York.

I would be very grateful if you could pass the attached terms of reference onto anyone you think might be appropriate. We are keen to move quite quickly on this, and would like to have someone on board in April. The ToR is online here: http://www.beyond2015.org/employment-opportunities

Lindsay – as the only US based member of the Exec Com, we would particularly appreciate the help of Interaction with this!

 

Many thanks

Best

 

Leo Williams

Beyond 2015 International Coordinator

Email: lwilliams@beyond2015.org

Phone: 32 (0)2 743 87 97

Fax: 32 (0)2 732 19 34

Skype: leosletters

www.beyond2015.org

 

We want to know your opinion! Make sure you send your feedback on Beyond 2015′s latest drafts on the Vision, Purpose, Values and Criteria for the post-2015 framework!

  Beyond 2015 Advocacy Coordinator ToR Jan 2014 clean

 

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Dear All,

 

UNITED NATIONS, MediaGlobal News — A two-day High-Level event began on Feb. 18 at the UN as Member States, civil society representatives, and stakeholders engaged in the first of a series of Thematic Debates of the General Assembly titled, “Water, Sanitation, and Sustainable Energy in the Post-2015 Development Agenda.”

A water and sanitation station utilized by thousands in an UN Internally Displaced Persons

camp in Juba, South Sudan. Photo credit: UN Photo/ Isaac Billy

The focus was set on identifying development challenges specific to safe and accessible water and sanitation services. Lack thereof is a target indicator among the UN’s eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and a violation of a person’s human rights.

In his remarks, the president of the 68th General Assembly, John W. Ashe of Antigua and Barbuda, stressed the magnitude of the crisis. Ashe stated, “783 million live without clean water, 2.5 billion have no adequate sanitation and 1.4 billion people are without access to electricity.”

Ashe said that it is a “compound magnifier of poverty, ill-health and mortality, and gender inequality.” However, if the problem was alleviated, he told the Assembly that it would “spare the lives of more than 3,000 children who die every day due to water-related illness.”

Goal seven, ensure environmental sustainability, is broken down into four target indicators. Target “C” calls for halving the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation by 2015.

“It’s no coincidence that sanitation is one of the most off-track targets and was not prioritized by all the decision makers in the MDG process,” Girish Menon, Deputy Director of Water Aid, tells MediaGlobal News. Menon cites former UN Secretary-General, Kofi Annan of Ghana, who, in relation to this issue stated, “No other issue suffers such disparity between its human importance and its political priority.”

“Leaving out sanitation as a target in the initially-agreed MDG was symptomatic of this problem, but inevitably has also contributed to its continuance,” Menon tells MediaGlobal News. “Ultimately though, the sanitation MDG target, on current trends, will be missed by over half a billion people.”

Living without, or with inadequate and unsafe water and sanitation is a multi-faceted problem. Speakers highlighted its impact on health and discrimination that women and girls face. Additionally, the effects of climate change exacerbate water stress and scarcity in many Least Developing Countries (LDCs).

Health is directly affected by a lack of hygiene, water, and sanitation. To the Assembly, Menon said diarrhea alone “claims the lives of 2,000 children under the age of five every single day – that’s the same as malaria, AIDS, and measles combined.”

“Quite honestly, when a child has diarrhea, the best thing is the Oral Rehydration Therapy and that doesn’t cost a lot of money and not exactly what you would call a medicine,” Ania Grobicki, Executive Secretary Global Water Partnership, tellsMediaGlobal News. “It’s a very simple solution, a mixture of salt and sugar in water.”

Aside for being susceptible to illness from dehydration and a lack of basic sanitation services, a child’s emotional and mental health is compromised.

Jorge Laguna-Celis, Senior Advisor to President Ashe, says, “The waste that they generate, the drainage, it flows along the street,” describing to MediaGlobal News one of the largest and most populated slums in Africa: Kibera in Nairobi, Kenya.

The settlement is divided into 12 villages. There, houses are built on suspended platforms, and basic service provision—especially water and sanitation—are grossly inadequate.

“It’s really a difficult image because the lack of a dignified way of living and the challenge that sanitation poses you can see there,” Laguna-Celis tells MediaGlobal News. “Children have to live in conditions of stagnation, children that have to play in streets that don’t really exist and where the brown matter is flowing in the street because they don’t have public toilets to relieve themselves. This case of Kibera is not unique.”

As young girls in poverty-stricken regions enter womanhood, poor living standards are burdened with discrimination and violence.

Menon told the Assembly that although enrolled in school, “girls dropout in droves when they start menstruating,” because they have no means to manage it hygienically. He explained that women carry heavy loads of fetched water, and are “sexually violated when they go in search of a place to relieve themselves in the open.”

UN agencies agreed that water and sanitation issues need to be at the forefront of the Post-2015 Development Agenda. Speakers advocated that access to water and sanitation is a basic human right, central toward building resilient and sustainable communities, and must be universally accessible by 2030.

Related Links

http://www.mediaglobal.org/2014/03/12/dignified-way-of-living-in-ldcs-burdened-by-most-off-track-mdg/

 

Ibrahim SIDIBE

Coordinator of the Initiative for Agricultural and Rural de Development in Mali (ARD)

Country Representative Young Professionals’ Platform for Agricultural Research for Development in Mali (YPARD)

BP-E: 4630 Bamako, Mali

Kalaban coura Street 200 Door 727

Phone: (00223) 20284223

Mobile: (00223) 76312529

Skype: sidhibe

E-mail: ibrahimsidhibe@gmail.com

Site: www.ypard.net.

 

 

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Please join in the: C20 Inclusive Growth and Employment E-Discussion

 

 

Article by soshea@unicef.org

 

This group will develop recommendations for the G20 to pursue the linked goals of boosting growth, creating quality jobs and reducing inequality. Tackling inequality has powerful economic benefits and is not only a key concern of civil society, but is also an imperative in achieving the G20’s Framework for Strong, Sustainable, Balanced and Inclusive Growth.

See more at: http://www.c20conversations.org.au/node/419336

10 Mar 2014 [ read more ]

 

 

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Please join in the: C20 Inclusive Growth and Employment E-Discussion

Article by soshea@unicef.org

This group will develop recommendations for the G20 to pursue the linked goals of boosting growth, creating quality jobs and reducing inequality. Tackling inequality has powerful economic benefits and is not only a key concern of civil society, but is also an imperative in achieving the G20’s Framework for Strong, Sustainable, Balanced and Inclusive Growth.

See more at: http://www.c20conversations.org.au/node/419336

10 Mar 2014 [ read more ]

 

20 Mar 2014 | Posted on: Addressing Inequalities New comment by victor briaunys

The implementation of the collective plan is made by mobilizers identified as leaders in their fields, and who undertake to act as volunteers. These agents should have some kind of interaction and activities with families. Training workshops They have been considered fundamental tools at work.  The content of the workshops includes: Mobilization Plan and contextualization of actions (given the profile of the participants), development of the work plan for implementation and dissemination of the Mobilization Plan.  Workshops should antender two profiles of participants:  Multipliers – leaders with the capacity to promote the plan, identify and form new partnerships to bring more mobilizers and expand the spatial coverage of their actions. Events are held with the support (NGOs) in selected according to the criteria of the priority areas of the Plan places. In some cases, in order to facilitate the grouping of people from various geographic regions  Mobilizers – local leaders and volunteers who work directly with families and communities, touting the importance of families participating, advising them on how to do it and watching them closely. Are taught in their own communities for a multiplying agent who has participated in a workshop, taking advantage of the local infrastructure. In some cases, depending on their strategic importance or size of the group, you can count on the presence of a representative of the (NGO)    Criteria for selection of public workshops:  Multipliers  Local leadership  Understanding and agreement with the objectives of the Mobilization Plan  Ability to articulate  Teaching capacity to form mobilizers  Ability to identify new leaders  Ability to promote the plan  Bring new partnerships (companies)  Ability to organize workshops  Commitment to the Plan  Ability to expand the geographic area ………..  Mobilizers  Local leadership  Have activities involving the target audience  Work in your institution in projects involving families, children and adolescents, and young women  Develop professional activity that has direct interaction with the audience  Understanding and agreement with the Plan objectives of mobilization    (NGOs) and entities representing, and technicians who work in government programs aimed at meeting the families, like the Center for Social Assistance Reference. Actions should encourage the expansion of the Mobilization Plan and, consequently, contribute to bring together the community by conducting awareness campaigns and adherence to voluntary work.  As partners and volunteers can collaborate with the Mobilization  Translate the guidelines, one by one, for families, showing them how they can help improve their performance is one of the forms of the partners and volunteers collaborate with the Mobilization Plan. For example:  Ensuring adequate for the job and create the habit group equipment. The Mobilization Plan of Action provides a strategy developed jointly with partners and presents three fundamental points: Guidelines and Suggestions for Implementation Activities. From these nominations, each volunteer (institutions or individuals) can assemble your own Action Plan, including other items in planning activities as mobilizing agents; opportunities to work where and when certain activity; resources, goals and deadlines.  Maintenance and expansion of mobilization actions  Training the network to implement the Plan. Social networks require integrated and stable relations between the partners. In a network, the actors share resources to achieve common goals, recognizing that cooperation is the best way for this. This interdependence between the partners recognizes that each actor has its own characteristics and features that can contribute to achieving the objectives – which would be more difficult if each acted independently and not coordinated manner. Another important characteristic of social networks is that they affect the flow and quality of information between the actors, since they tend to have greater confidence in personal and known sources of information.  Encouraging families network of educators is being done through:  indications of the key actors.  activities such as workshops, presentations, Releases.  Local Committees – a number of such local networks institutionalization, but not limited to.  surveys with various secondary sources (names of people and institutions) continuously feeding a database.  Follow-up actions  The structuring of the actors in the network sees more effective coordination of actions and monitoring. The monitoring of the actions of the Mobilization Plan must be made primarily based on two dimensions:  Spatial, aiming at monitoring the actions in the various cities and regions in which the Plan’s actions are performed, based on the actions of the Local Committees Mobilization;  For the training workshop, from the work plans outlined by the participants in the workshops in which they participate. The multipliers are responsible for monitor – monitor, correct direction, encourage, discuss best practices and outcomes – groups of activists in certain communities. In this case, the guidance is to look, where possible, Victor Briaunys

20 Mar 2014 [ read more ] [ reply ]

 

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Please join in the: C20 Inclusive Growth and Employment E-Discussion

Article by soshea@unicef.org

This group will develop recommendations for the G20 to pursue the linked goals of boosting growth, creating quality jobs and reducing inequality. Tackling inequality has powerful economic benefits and is not only a key concern of civil society, but is also an imperative in achieving the G20’s Framework for Strong, Sustainable, Balanced and Inclusive Growth.

See more at: http://www.c20conversations.org.au/node/419336

10 Mar 2014 [ read more ]

 

 

21 Mar 2014 | Posted on: Addressing Inequalities New comment by Amis des Etrangers au Togo

Thank  you We must engaded like ONG : AMIS DES ETRANGERS AU  TOGO : ADET

Tax exempted No 507/MPDAT/2014

Our jobs and vision for the world we want Domaine(s) d’activité & Zone(s) d’expertise: Internationale Gender Issues and Advancement of Women:  •  Conseils politiques  •  Droits des Femmes  •  Education et formation des femmes  •  Femmes au pouvoir et dans les processus decisionnels  •  Femmes autochtones  •  Femmes et VIH/SIDA  •  Femmes et conflits armés  •  Femmes et environnement  •  Femmes et médias  •  Femmes et médias  •  Femmes et pauvreté  •  Femmes et santé  •  Femmes et économie  •  Hommes et garçons  •  La fille  •  Mécanismes institutionnels pour la promotion de la femme  •  Objectifs de développement du Millénaire  •  Plaidoyer et sensibilisation  •  Prestation de services  •  Recherche  •  Renforcement de capacités  •  Technologies de l’information et de communication  •  Trafic de femmes et de filles  •  Violence contre les femmes  Social Development:  •  Conflits •  Coopération technique •  Coopératives •  Emploi •  Jeunesse •  Pauvreté •  Personnes handicapées •  Politique sociale •  Problématiques des peuples autochtones • Technologies de l’information et de communication       •     Vieillissement • Migrants

Sustainable Development:  •  Agriculture  •  Atmosphère  •  Biodiversité  •  Biotechnologie  •  Changement climatique  •  Colonies humaines  •  Commerce et environnement  •  Coopération internationale pour un environnement favorable  •  Droit international  •  Déchets (dangereux)  •  Déchets (radioactifs)  •  Déchets (solides)  •  Démographie  •  Désertification et sècheresses  •  Développement durable dans un monde globalisé  •  Développement durable pour l’Afrique  •  Développement durables des SIDS  •  Développement industriel  •  Développement rural  •  Eau douce  •  Education  •  Egalité des sexes  •  Energie  •  Exploitation minière  •  Finance  •  Forêts  •  Gestion des déchets  •  Gestion des désastres et des risques  •  Gestion du territoire  •  Groupes majeurs  •  Hygiène  •  Indicateurs  •  Information pour la participation du publique aux prises de décisions  •  Mers et océans  •  Modèles de production et de consommation  •  Montagnes  •  Moyens de mise en œuvre (Commerce, Finance, Technologie,etc…))  •  Mécanismes institutionnels  •  Partenariats  •  Pauvreté  •  Prise de décisions intégrée  •  Produits chimiques toxiques  •  Protection et gestion des ressources naturelles  •  Renforcement de capacités  •  Ressources marines  •  Santé  •  Science  •  Technologie  •  Tourisme durable  •  Transport  Peace and Development in Africa:  •  Développement en Afrique  •  Paix en Afrique  Conflict Resolution in Africa:  •  Résolution des conflits

http:/www.facebook.com/pages/Amis- des -Etrangers -au –Togo- adet/1410382492536147

Avenue Jean Paul II  BP : 20123 Lomé-Togo Tel : (228 22349806/92473495/99495859

Mail: sossougadoss@yahoo.fr

21 Mar 2014 [ read more ] [ reply ]

 

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Dear Friends:

The United Nations touches a very substantial proportion of the global population as beneficiaries, contributors, and employees. Every two years the Ralph Bunche Institute’s FUNDS project and Dalberg Research undertake a global survey of the UN’s contribution to development.

Since the subject may be of interest to you, you are invited to participate in the 2014 global survey on the future of the United Nations development system.

You will find below the link to the questionnaire (in several languages). The questionnaire takes approximately 10 minutes to complete.

English: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GlobalUNSurvey2014

Spanish: https://es.surveymonkey.com/s/2014_FutureUN_Survey_spanish

French: https://fr.surveymonkey.com/s/2014_FutureUN_Survey

Arabic: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2014_FutureUN_Survey_arabic

Chinese: https://zh.surveymonkey.com/s/2014_FutureUN_Survey_chinese

We would very much value your response and you will receive a copy of the findings.

Tom Weiss, Stephen Browne and Vikas Nath

http://futureun.org/en/

 

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http://post2015.iisd.org/           http://post2015.iisd.org/post2015-update/2013-09-11/

 

http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?

 

http://www.worldwewant2015.org/regions-sub/160331

 

http://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/librarypage/mdg/the-millennium-development-goals-report-2013/

 

http://www.oxfam.org/en/policy/how-disasters-disrupt-development

 

http://www.globalnetwork-dr.org/news/404.html

 

http://www.article19.org/resources.php/resource/37393/en/access-to-information-central-to-the-post-2015-development-agenda

 

 

http://www.transconflict.com/approach/advocate/bringing-peace-into-the-post-2015-development-framework/

 

http://www.transconflict.com/2013/04/the-eu-and-post-2015-towards-a-decent-peace-for-all-174/

 

 

http://www.un-ngls.org/spip.php?article4360

    http://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/index.php?menu=1680

http://webtv.un.org/       http://www.unescousa.org/

 

 

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Post 2015:  Call for applicatio​ns: FUTURE EARTH Engagement Committee – Internatio​nal Council for Science [ICSU] Deadline March 14th

Post 2015: Call for applications: FUTURE EARTH Engagement Committee – International Council for Science [ICSU]     Deadline March 14th

 

Members sought for FUTURE EARTH ENGAGEMENT COMMITTEE that will connect science and society in decisive period for post-2015 development

 

Dear Colleagues,

 

Members are sought for the inaugural Engagement Committee of Future Earth, the global research platform providing the knowledge to accelerate our transformations to a sustainable world. Future Earth is a 10-year international research programme that will mobilise multi-disciplinary expertise, stakeholders and resources to ensure that scientific knowledge makes a larger contribution to societal debate and decision-making for sustainable development.

The formation of an Engagement Committee for Future Earth takes place at a crucial juncture for global sustainable development. The ongoing definition of Sustainable Development Goals and the prospect of a new global climate agreement at COP21 make this a potentially transformative period, underpinned by an increasing appreciation that the problems of today are global and highly connected calling for an unprecedented collaboration across a wide range of stakeholders.

Future Earth aims to create a step-change in science by co-designing and co-delivering solutions-oriented research for sustainable development with government, business and civil society. Future Earth integrates major international research programmes and projects that have pioneered research on global environmental change over the past decades – DIVERSITAS, the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP), the International Human Dimensions Programme (IHDP) and the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP).

The Future Earth Engagement Committee will be a strategic advisory group, comprising thought-leaders from stakeholder groups including business, policy and civil society. Working together with the Future Earth Science Committee and the Secretariat, its primary purpose will be to foster in-depth and innovative interactions between science and society. The Engagement Committee will provide leadership and creative thinking on how to bridge the gap between knowledge and solutions for sustainable development.

The deadline for applications is 14 March 2014. For more information and to apply, please see our announcement: http://www.icsu.org/news-centre/news/call-for-applications-for-future-earth-engagement-committee

Future Earth is sponsored by the members of the Science and Technology Alliance for Global Sustainability comprising the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), the Belmont Forum of funding agencies, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the United Nations University (UNU), and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) as an observer.

___

Anne-Sophie Stevance Science Officer
International Council for Science (ICSU)

Future Earth Interim Secretariat

5 rue Auguste Vacquerie, 75116 Paris, France

Tel. +33 1 45 25 67 04 | Fax.  +33 1 42 88 94 31

anne-sophie.stevance@icsu.org | www.icsu.org | www.icsu.org/future-earth

Follow us on Twitter @ICSUnews @FutureEarth
Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/InternationalScience; www.facebook.com/futureearth.info

Visit the Future Earth blog http://www.futureearth.info/

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Dear colleagues in the Global Gender & Climate Allaince
March 10 marked the start of the Commission on the Status of Women – the annual gathering in NYC where countries monitor progress against womens rights. This year states will discuss gender and the MDGs post 2015.
CARE is in NYC with a delegation of activists from across our network. As per the attached policy briefing ”Making womens rights and gender equality a reality post 2015”, we are lobbying for a standalone gender goal and for strong enabling policies that deliver on gender equality including in the area of climate change.
Please do share it with your respective governments and networks over the CSW period and beyond.
For any questions or to make contact with CARE staff at CSW, please contact my colleagues Kate Hunt khunt@care.org and Aisha Rahamatali rahamatali@careinternational.org
All the best
Agnes
Agnes Otzelberger  |  CARE  |  Climate Change Adaptation and Gender Coordinator |  Poverty, Environment and Climate Change Network (PECCN) 
Brighton, UK  |  www.careclimatechange.org
T: +43 (0)660 5870506  |  Twitter: @AgnesCARE
skype: agnes_otz

UN Women Care CIUK WRGE Brief v3

 

 

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Fwd: TOGETHER WE STAND:Coor​dinating Efforts for a Global Movement on the Post-2015 Sustainabl​e Developmen​t Agenda

UPDATED Communique_Together We Stand VIstanbul V4

 

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New post-2015 advocacy coordinato​r role at CAFOD

 From: Neva Frecheville [mailto:nfrecheville@cafod.org.uk]

CAFOD have just approved a new post of advocacy coordinator, working on the post-2015 development agenda through our global faith based networks. There is the opportunity for us to support international applications. If you could identify people who you think might be interested, please send this link on to them. It needs someone with a good level of advocacy experience, someone who is a great team player, and someone who understands the role faith can have in positive change.

http://www.cafod.org.uk/Work-with-us/UK-Jobs/Advocacy-Coordinator

Any questions, let me know.

Best wishes

Neva Frecheville

Co-Chair of Beyond 2015

www.beyond2015.org

Lead Analyst on Post-MDGs

CAFOD

Direct line: +44 (0)207 0955422

Mobile: +44 (0) 7920 234 745

Romero House, 55 Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7JB

Twitter: @CAFODwire

George Ndungu,

Secretary for International Affairs and Kenya Chairperson.

Organisation of African Youth (www.oayouth.org)

African Youth Representative for Rio+20.

Convener: African Youth Conference on Post-2015 Development Agenda

 

 

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African Union Letter Draft African Common Position on Post-2015 Agenda

 

Hello, 


I am glad to share with you the  Common Africa Position (CAP) – which was endorsed by Heads of State at the AU Summit last month. It has major focus on youth with the mentioning several times. Hoping this will not just be words but a commitmnet followed by concrete actions. 

As an attempt to influence the High Level Committee before they meet to finalize the CAP and strategize in Chad later this month (Next week). We will draft a youth advocacy letter. The letter will refer to CAP to ephasis on the recommendations made and also which of our asks (non-negotiable) were not reflected and should be?

I will support in facilitating the drafting of the letter which should be ready for sending out by end of tomorrow due to time constraints. I am kindly requesting for you to review the CAP attached and send to me your input by tomorrow for the letter which will assist in developing a draft. I will then share the draft letter tomorrow for endorsement by the organizations you represent. 

Kindly download the position paper here as it is too large to attach: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxQTOSWrlNEkR0JVUGhQRFRBaUk/edit?usp=sharing

Thank you for your usual cooperation. The youth advocacy continues….. 

Cheers!


George Ndungu,
Secretary for International Affairs and Kenya Chairperson.
Organisation of African Youth (www.oayouth.org)
African Youth Representative for Rio+20.
Convener: African Youth Conference on Post-2015 Development Agenda

 

African Union Letter Draft African Common Position on Post-2015 Agenda

 

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Congratulations to the Organisation of African Youth (OAYouth) for being selected to join Beyond 2015 Executive Committee (2014-2016). This represents a great milestone to our youth advocacy work and our commitment to further support the youth aspirations and values for a Post-2015 Agenda.

Lets continue the engagement and pushing for the youth agenda.

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Leo WILLIAMS <Leo.Williams@concordeurope.org>
Date: Tue, Feb 25, 2014 at 10:42 PM
Subject: [Beyond 2015:270] Introducing the new Beyond 2015 Executive Committee
To: “beyond2015@googlegroups.com” <beyond2015@googlegroups.com>

Chère Beyond 2015

Nous sommes heureux de partager avec vous les résultats du processus récent de sélection du nouveau Comité Exécutif de Beyond 2015. Nous espérons que toutes les organisations qui participent à Beyond 2015 donneront leur plein soutien aux organisations qui composent le nouveau Comité, notamment:

 

Plus de détails sur le processus de sélection peuvent être trouvés ci-joint.

Un grand merci à toutes les organisations qui ont postulé, et à tous ceux qui ont voté et ont participé à l’appel d’approche.

Cordialement

Leo Williams

International Coordinator

Beyond 2015

www.beyond2015.org


Querida Beyond 2015

Nos complace compartir con ustedes los resultados del reciente proceso de selección del nuevo Comité Ejecutivo de Beyond 2015. Esperamos que todas las organizaciones que participan en Beyond 2015 darán todo su apoyo a las organizaciones que conforman el nuevo Comité, en particular:

Organisation of African Youth (Kenya)

Otros detalles del proceso de selección se puede encontrar adjunto.

Muchas gracias a todas las organizaciones que solicitaron, así como a todos los que votaron y participaron en la llamada de extensión.

Cordialemente

Leo Williams

International Coordinator

Beyond 2015

www.beyond2015.org


Dear Beyond 2015

We are pleased to share with you the results of the recent selection process of the new Beyond 2015 Executive Committee. We hope that all organisations participating in Beyond 2015 will give their full support to the organisations which make up the new Committee, notably:

Further details of the selection process can be found attached.

Many thanks to all organisations who applied, and indeed to all of those who voted and participated in the outreach call!

Best regards

Leo Williams

International Coordinator

Beyond 2015

www.beyond2015.org


 

You have received this message because you are subscribed to the “Beyond 2015″ Google Group
To send messages to this group, send an e-mail to beyond2015@googlegroups.com
To unsubscribe from this group, send an e-mail to beyond2015+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com
To visit Beyond 2015′s website, visit
http://www.beyond2015.org/

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Beyond 2015″ group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to beyond2015+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/groups/opt_out.
George Ndungu,
National Coordinator,
Kenya Youth Network for Rio+20 and Beyond.
Advocating for Green Economy in Kenya.
+254719810024.
www.kenyayouthnetwork.blogspot.com

George Ndungu,

Secretary for International Affairs and Kenya Chairperson.

Organisation of African Youth (www.oayouth.org)

 

New Beyond 2015 Selection Committee communication finalFr.docx

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New Beyond 2015 Selection Committee communication finalEng.docx

66 KB

 

New Beyond 2015 Selection Committee communication finalSp.docx

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 Beyond (1) New Beyond 2015 Selection Committee communication finalFr

 

Beyond (2) New Beyond 2015 Selection Committee communication finalENG

 

Beyond (3) New Beyond 2015 Selection Committee communication finalSP

 

 

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Dear All,

6 February 2014 – General Assembly President John Ashe today launched a major effort to harness the support of all 193 United Nations Member States and civil society to formulate a new development agenda with the potential to guide the course of humankind away from poverty for decades to come.

“Like all of you, I am all too aware of the enormous challenges facing our globe,” he told an interactive briefing of global civil society representatives from UN Headquarters in New York. “With the 2015 deadline looming, we need to be collectively focused on building momentum for the post-2015 agenda.”

Mr. Ashe has made the effort to achieve a new post-2015 development agenda to succeed the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) the hallmark of his year-long Assembly presidency which ends in September.

The MDGs, agreed by world leaders at a UN summit in 2000, aim to slash extreme hunger and poverty, cut maternal and infant mortality, combat disease and provide access to universal education and health care, all by the end of 2015. But these targets will not be reached in many countries and areas, and they will be incorporated in an even more ambitious post-2015 agenda.

“You and your various organizations are the trusted partners of the United Nations,” Mr. Ashe said. “As President of the 68th session of the General Assembly, I see no greater task or mandate for my term than to support this vital process of getting the framework and content of the post-2015 development agenda right, so that people everywhere can live in dignity and with opportunities in their societies and economies…”

“I am confident that we can all come together around one global sustainable development agenda, with poverty eradication at its centre and with true ownership from both governmental and non-governmental actors alike.”

Mr. Ashe has set six major initiatives to jumpstart progress on sustainable development after 2015. In the coming months he will convene three high-level events focused on women, youth and civil society (6-7 March); human rights and rule of law (17-18 June); and South-South cooperation, triangular cooperation and information communication technology (ICT) for development (20-21 May).

He will also three thematic debates, on the role of partnerships (9-10 April); how stable and peaceful societies can contribute to development (24-25 April); and on the way that water, sanitation and sustainable energy (18-19 February) can contribute to the post-2015 development agenda.

Also addressing today’s briefing, UN Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson noted that elaborating a new development agenda has already benefited from an unprecedented and inclusive approach.

“Non-governmental organizations, the private sector, local authorities, trade unions, academics and citizens themselves have all been involved,” he said.

“I sense great dynamism in this room. Civil society groups are driving progress across the international agenda. On peace, human rights, inequalities, rule of law, climate change, poverty eradication, sustainable development and many other issues we rely also on you to push for progress among Governments – and generate action on the ground,” he added.

“We are at a crossroads on our journey to define the future development agenda. I count on you to continue advancing alongside Governments every step of the way. Civil society organizations are a source of ideas and inspiration. You are key critical development partners, agents of change, and watchdogs.”

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=47098&Cr=development+agenda&Cr1#.UvjIx2IhDK1

Ibrahim SIDIBE

Country YPARD-Mali

 

United Nations  Millenium Goals Development Report:

Year 2013, http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/report-2013/mdg-report-2013-english.pdf

Year 2012

http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/MDG%20Report%202012.pdf

 

 

 

UN General Assembly on  Post-2015_Development_Agenda

 

http://www.un.org/sg/management/hlppost2015.shtml

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dgFVfYBg9DI&feature=youtu.be

 

https://www.globalreporting.org/information/policy/rioplus20/Pages/Sustainability-Reporting-Rio20.aspx

 

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Kindly find attached the summary Draft Africa Regional Report on the Sustainable Development Goals. It includes the outcome of the regional consultative meeting held early this month.
As you will note goal 6 is: Intensify Gender Equality, Women Empowerment and Youth Development.
Our call for a stand alone goal on youth development has not yet gone through but lobby should continue. After all, Africa continent has the youngest youth population. Some of the targets included in the report for youth are:
(b) Raise Youth Employment and Development
6b.1 Reduce youth unemployment by at least 5% every
year
6b.2 Half the number of illiterate youths by 2020
6b.3 Resource youth development agencies and
programmes
6b.4 Put in place youth skills development programmes
to build necessary skills
6b.5 Create youth development funds and programmes
6b.6 Provide for youth representation in decision
making processes and structures
6b.7 Reform education and vocational training to
develop appropriate skills that meet labour market needs
Do you think so far we have achieved something or what can we do better to achieve more?
Cheers!

George Ndungu,
Secretary for International Affairs and Kenya Chairperson.
Organisation of African Youth (www.oayouth.org)
African Youth Representative for Rio+20.
Convener: African Youth Conference on Post-2015 Development Agenda

Africa Report Sustainable Dev 2013 Regional Report MDG Dev Goals summary PDF

 

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BRIEFING NOTE ON THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY’S SPECIAL EVENT TOWARDS ACHIEVING THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS  25 SEPTEMBER 2013

http://www.iisd.ca/mdgs/se/html/crsvol153num10e.html

 

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http://www.worldwewant2015.org/inequalities

http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/

http://www.worldwewant2015.org/millionvoices   /

http://www.worldwewant2015.org/   http://map.worldwewant2015.org/

http://www.myworld2015.org/?partner=H.H.Oord

448.pdf 448.pdf 2178 kB   Weergeven   Downloaden

 

http://www.crowdoutaids.org/wordpress/help-create-a-new-narrative-on-aids-join-act-2015/

 

 

 

     

 

 

UNConsultES-KCK.pdf UNConsultES-KCK.pdf 92 kB   Weergeven   Downloaden

 

Send us your nomination!

To enter the MY World Partner Recognition Award, please:

  • Review the enclosed MY World Award Rules
  • Fill out the enclosed nomination form and send it to

award@myworld2015.org indicating “Nomination MW Award” in the subject line

The deadline for submissions is 25 August 2013.

 

MY World Awards Rules.pdf MY World Awards Rules.pdf 244 kB   Weergeven   Downloaden
Annex I. MY World Award Nomination form.docx Annex I. MY World Award Nomination form.docx 17 kB   Weergeven   Downloaden

 

 

http://www.worldwewant2015.org/?destination=user%2F78630%2Fnotifications

Oxfam calls upon G20 to track inequality      /     http://dialogues.civil20.org/node/305195

Terms of reference - Youth Coordinator- UN Millenium Campaign.pdf Terms of reference – Youth Coordinator- UN Millenium Campaign.pdf 459 kB   Weergeven   Downloaden

 

 

 

MW Recognition Event Invitation_MW Partner.pdf MW Recognition Event Invitation_MW Partner.pdf 373 kB   Weergeven   Downloaden
MW Partner Recognition Programme + Logistics Note.pdf MW Partner Recognition Programme + Logistics Note.pdf 410 kB   Weergeven   Downloaden
  • SEPTEMBER 25TH UNITED NATIONS NEW YORK

 MY WORLD Partner Recognition Programme + Logistics Note_pdf

 

 MY WORLD  Recognition Event Invitation_MW Partner_pdf

 

 

 

  •  [NGO News]: NGLS hosts online civil society consultati​ons on four post-2015 reports
  • The deadline for submissions to the consultation is 12 July 2013.
    A guidance note for the consultation is available here, which includes a compilation of the goals and targets proposed in the reports by the Post-2015 High-level Panel, the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN), and the UN Global Compact, as well as a listing of the thematic sessions that will be conducted by the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals between November 2013 and February 2014.

 

 

 

World We Want 2015

Question for Consideration: Can “extreme poverty” be “eradicated” without focusing on inequalities?

Discussion by   tcallender@unicef.org

 

 

 

 

 

http://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/index.php?menu=1549

 

http://www.post2015hlp.org/featured/high-level-panel-releases-recommendations-for-worlds-next-development-agenda/

 

 Workshop34DraftAgendasforInvitationsMay24.doc PDF

 

 

 

 

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Post 2015 Agenda on Population and Youth Employment Conference

In the framework of the 5th African University on Youth and Development (www.fcj.org.cv/5auyd), the Cape Verde Youth Federation and the Organisation of African Youth, in partnership with ILO, UN in Cape Verde and the main youth networks in Africa is organising the Post 2015 Agenda on Population and Youth Employment Conference in S. Vicente (Cape Verde) from May 8th to 10th.

 http://fcj.org.cv/index.php/inscribe

Full information about the programme, concept note and practicalities is available at:

http://fcj.org.cv/index.php/programme

 

 

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Register your organisation as a MY World partner and get a unique MY World partner ID and URL link

 

 

How…. to give a heads up on MY World website going live

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Ms. Hélène H. Oord
Worldview Mission (WM) Chair & Founder
Headquarter EU/NL) Netherlands
+31 (0) 10-785-7863   Land-line
Skype: helene.oord
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Mr. Willice O. Onyango
Ambassador to United Nations to Worldview Mission WM,
Youth Ambassador Coordinator Post 2015 Agenda
Chairperson, -IYC Kenya
Phone: 0726570757
Skype: willice.okoth
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Mr. Mordekai Shumba ,

President, Our African Youth,

Zimbabwe Mr. Jude Thaddues Njikem,

Vice-President, Our African Youth, Sierra Leone

E-Mail: jude@oayouth.org  / judejudoh@gmail.com

Site: http://www.aydac2012.org

Site: http://oayouth.org/index.php/about-us/the-team

Site: http://worldview-mission-oayouth.blogspot.com/

Site: http://worldview-mission-oayouth.blogspot.com/p/about-us.html

Site: http://worldview-mission-oayouth.blogspot.nl/#!/2012/11/post-2015-development-agenda.html

 

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We encourage you to see these brilliant videos and create your own video and upload Youth Voices in opsot-2015

             

 

                                                                          

 

 

 

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  • For specific question on Child and Youth Participation on Post-2015

Please Contact: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*WM is Standing Up ,* Taking Action* , **Making Noise for the UN MDGL’s !!!**

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