Agenda for Dev

 

 

        AGENDA  Worldview Mission  2013-2015 and  beyond

 

 

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http://www.ohchr.org/en/hrbodies/upr/pages/UPRSessions.aspx

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https://www.accessnow.org/pages/calendar

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E-book: CORPORATE CAPTURE of the International Development Agenda and why the SDGs cannot stop it

Dear CPG4SD,

Below is the newest CPG booklet on Corporate Capture.  This has been posted in the peoplesgoals.org/devjustice website, please click here: http://bit.ly/1FZL33H to visit the site; as well as circulated in the Facebook page of Peoplesgoals and Development Justice.

Feel free to circulate this in your networks and friends.

Best,

April
for the Secretariat

Corporate Plunder ebook

Corporate Book

Member States of the United Nations (UN) have set 2015 as the year when they chart a new course for humanity. After nearly three years of consultations and intergovernmental negotiations, Heads of State and Governments adopted the “2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” on September 24, 2015. UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon describes this as “a plan of action for ending poverty in all its dimensions, irreversibly, everywhere, and leaving no one behind.”

However, many people’s organizations and movements are more cautious if not skeptical. This collection of articles produced by the Campaign for Peoples Goals for Sustainable Development (CPGSD) and IBON International illuminates why. It reflects the lived experience of indigenous peoples, small farmers and peasants, migrants, and ordinary citizens from various regions of the global south under the neoliberal mode of development – the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) notwithstanding. It also critically examines the prospects of achieving the new set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) under the 2030 Agenda in the face of dominant trends in government policies and practices.

The publication serves as a timely and urgent reminder to advocates and governments alike that the people will not be placated by lofty pledges and grand declarations. For as long as the structural roots of poverty, inequality, exclusion and environmental destruction are not addressed; for as long as the failed and unjust economic and political system remains intact; there will be reason for people to resist and to struggle for an alternative future.

Dear all,

Below is the newest CPG publication, Corporate Capture of the International Development Agenda and why the SDGs cannot stop it.“  It can be downloaded here: http://bit.ly/1FZL33H

Feel free to circulate this in your networks and friends.

And for those of you in New York, please join us on Sept. 28 for Days of Action for Justice

Sept. 24, 5 pm: Speak out for Climate Justice
Gather in front of Mid-Manhattan Public Library on 5th Avenue and 40th Street for a participatory action for climate justice and system change the evening Pope Francis arrives.

Sept. 26, 5pm: March Against Forced Migration and Displacement. 
Gather at Washington Square Park (by water fountain) as we march from NYU to St. Francis Church where there will be a forum on desaparecidos on the evening of Sept. 26.

Sept. 27, 5:30pm: People’s General Assembly
at NYU Law School (40 Washington Square South)

Sept. 28, 10am-6pm: Dialogues for Justice, the Public Interest and the Common Good: A Public forum-workshop the day after the UN Development Summit where we will be mobilizing social justice/ envi justice groups to reflect on the outcomes of the UN Development Summit and the impacts of US government policies internationally and domestically.

Please register at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/dialogues-for-justice-the-public-interest-and-the-common-good-from-the-margins-and-the-frontlines-tickets-18208628498

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Statement of of migrants and advocates on the Post-2015 Development Agenda

Forced migration and displacement to heighten under corporate interest-driven neoliberal development.

This month, the Heads of States and governments will be gathering at United Nations headquarters in New York City to adopt the world’s development agenda for the next 15 years. UN Member States are expected to deliberate and finally approve the new set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that is said to build from the results of the Millennium Development Goals that ends this year.

The bold and ambitious document that contains 17 goals and 169 targets in the areas of People, Planet, Prosperity, Peace and Partnership is projected to “transform the world” and will “leave no one behind” in the march towards development.

While the aims are laudable and the calls are noble, the post-2015 development agenda’s tacit approval of the neoliberal approach to development does not inspire confidence that the aims and calls will be realized in the genuine spirit of human rights, justice and people’s development.

Migrants and those forcibly displaced including refugees have much at stake in the post-2015 development agenda. Displacement – whether migrants or refugees pushed out of their community and country by economic hardships, wars or persecution – is very much an issue of ensuring a holistic development for the people.

There currently are 232 million migrants and 19.5 million refugees around the world. The issues of refugees are most profoundly shown by the current condition of those forced by war from their home and struggling to come to safety in Europe. They, however, like many other refugees and undocumented migrants in transit, meet harm even before they reach their intended destination.

For development to be truly relevant to the condition of migrants and responsive to their aspirations, it foremostly must resolve the economic, political, social, cultural and environmental problems that force people to leave their country of birth and settle elsewhere. Migration is a right and for it to must be a truly free practice of a right, forced migration and displacement must be put as a development concern.

In countries hosting migrants, the prevalent framework is to allow for migration flow that brings in the skilled but cheap and disposable labor the various economic sectors need. Borders are closed and migration policies constrict that ensure foreign workers continue to live and work in the margins. The harsh treatment refugees receive show how governments of most countries of destination view them as burdens and, together with foreign workers, stealers of jobs and of dwindling social services.

In the countries of destination, the rights of migrants as workers, as women and as human beings are grossly violated.

In the face of this condition, the outcome document that UN Member States are set to adopt leaves a lot to be desired. In fact, the new agenda tries to bring a new wave of optimism for a fundamentally unchanged neoliberal development strategy that puts premium on corporations and private interests. This framework has been used by states for the past decades and has resulted to wide and deep inequalities among countries, within countries and between men and women.

In relation to migrants and migration, the new set of goals and targets show that, instead of looking at migration as a development problem to be addressed, it is viewed as an opportunity for development. Point #29 of the Declaration talks of international migration’s “relevance” to development instead of looking at the steadily increasing number of migrants – from 175 million when the MDGs were formulated to the current 232 million – as a failure of the development framework and strategy.

While there are positive points that can be said of the outcome document that can impact on the condition of migrants – particularly Goal 8.8 that calls to “protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments of all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment”; Goal 10.3 that aims to “ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including through eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practice…” that may be assumed to include migrants, and; Goal 10.c that targets by 2030 “(to) reduce to less than 3% the transaction costs of migrant remittances and eliminate remittance corridors with costs higher than 5%” - these are eclipsed by the obvious adherence of the document to the migration for development agenda that serves neoliberal globalization.

It is important to note that most of the targets relating to migrants are put in Goal 10 (Reduce inequality within and among countries) and in particular in 10.7 that says: Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies.

Though the inclusion of the Goal 10 is a step forward, it shows that governments believe that: 1. Migration, that is a “planned and well-managed”, can reduce inequalities within and among countries, and; 2. The concern on remittance is confined merely on the transaction rate.

As migration and forced displacement are results of lack of development and skewed economic policies including problematic aid architecture, these analyses are not only superficial but are downright encouragement for countries to further develop and systematize labour export programs in the guise of managing migration, and to exert efforts to increase the volume of remittance as means to address the inequality among countries, inequality within countries (and the inequality between men and women) that have shaped current migration.

The danger posed to migrants and other displaced people by the development framework carried by the agenda is doubled by the fact that while the post-2015 development agenda attempts to drumbeat hope and optimism, rich and powerful countries are setting to unleash a new and more intense wave of neoliberal policies through perncious trade deals such as the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) and similar trade agreements in other regions. From the promotion of the deceptive Public Private Partnership scheme, to the further opening up of service sector and public utilities to private capital, and even to the open-season for plunder of lands and natural resources for foreign corporations, the different trade agreements are setting the course for the crises still being felt by the people to further prolong and even worsen.

To “transform the world” and to “leave no one behind” are tall orders in the current condition of inequality, poverty, displacement and injustices in all spheres. Definitely, the development path charted by corporate interest-dictated neoliberal framework and strategies that the post-2015 development agenda adheres to will not lead to such ideals.

In the end, it will be up to the people with its collective strength to show to governments the kind of development that will be truly be equitable, sustainable and respective of the rights of the people, especially those in the margins including migrants and the displaced.#

Endorsed by:

Asia Pacific Mission for Migrants (APMM)

Asian Migrants Coordinating Body

Asian Students Promoting Immigrant Rights through Education or ASPIRE (California, USA)

Association of Indonesian Migrant Workers – HK

Association of Indonesian Migrant Workers – Macau

BAYAN CANADA

BAYAN HK and Macau

BAYAN USA

Centre d’appui aux Philippines – Centre for Philippine Concerns (Montréal, Québec)

Centre des travailleuses et travailleurs immigrants – Immigrant Workers Centre (Montréal, Québec)

Confédération Nationale des Travailleurs du Sénégal (CNTS)

Filipino Migrant Worker’s Union

GAMMI

IMA Research Foundation

Indonesian Migrant Workers Union – HK

Indonesian Migrant Workers Union – Macau

International Action Center

Kilusang Mayo Uno

LIPMI

May 1st Coalition NYC

MIGRANTE Europe

MIGRANTE Netherlands

MIGRANTE International

Movimiento Migrante Mesoamericano

National Alliance for Filipino Concerns (NAFCON-USA)

Peoples Power Assembly

Philippine Forum – NY

PILAR – HK

PINAY – Canada

Trans Asia Sisters Association in Taiwan (TASAT)

TENAGANITA Malaysia

United Filipinos in Hong Kong (UNIFIL-HK)

* This sign-on statement was initiated by the Asia Pacific Mission for Migrants (APMM) with website at www.apmigrants.org

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Forced Migration in Central America: The dark side of neoliberalism in the Americas

Part of the on-going campaign on the alternative development framework
for the new development agenda to be approved on the 70th anniversary of
the United Nations on September 25, 2015 in New York City, the Campaign
for Peoples Goals for Sustainable Development would like to share with
you the issue of forced migration in Central America.

Clink on this link to read the article and the factsheet on this very
relevant struggle:
http://peoplesgoals.org/devjustice/campaigns/forced-migration-in-central-america-the-dark-side-of-neoliberalism-in-the-americas/

I encourage everyone to share the article – posted in the website (link
above) and in Facebook (The Peoples Goals and Development Justice).

Let’s continue to further the campaigns and struggles by amplifying this
in the broadest possible way to get our message across the official space.

Best,

April
for the Secretariat

http://peoplesgoals.org/devjustice/
https://www.facebook.com/ThePeoplesGoals?ref=bookmarks
https://www.facebook.com/daysfordevjustice?ref=bookmarks

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Paul Quintos <pquintos@iboninternational.org> wrote:

STATEMENT:
Reclaim our future.  Oppose the corporate “development” agenda

REQUEST FOR ORGANIZATIONAL ENDORSEMENTS BY AUGUST 7, 2015Dear all,In September of this year, Heads of States and Governments will gather at the United Nations (UN) headquarters in New York City to agree on a new set of “Sustainable Development Goals” (SDGs) and a “global plan of action for people, planet and prosperity”.  The latest draft of this declaration which promises to “transform our world” by 2030 and ensure that “no one will be left behind” in the process has just been released today.

However, many of these same governments, particularly the more powerful ones among them, are also currently negotiating new “free trade” deals that will have far-reaching implications for peoples in both the global North and South and for the future of the world economy and the planet.  Indeed, the top negotiators from 12 countries representing over 60% of the global economy are currently meeting in Hawaii, US desperately trying to conclude by the end of this week the transpacific partnership agreement (TPP), the largest “trade” agreement since the establishment of the WTO in 1994.

These agreements as they are currently framed and when adopted side-by-side, will not usher a new dawn for humanity.  Instead they are likely to further concentrate power and wealth in the hands of the 1% on the one hand, and deepen the dispossession, exploitation and oppression of peoples and environmental plunder on the other.

We need to let these governments know that we will not accept a “development” agenda that will serve as a vehicle for strengthening corporate power, re-legitimize the global capitalist growth model and perpetuate neoliberal globalization.

Please send organizational endorsements to the attached statement, with country, to April at secretariat@peoplesgoals.org, by Friday, August 7th.

And please share this widely…

-- 
Paul Quintos
IBON International
3rd Flr., IBON Center
114 Timog Avenue,
Quezon City 1103
Philippines
Telefax: +63 2 9276981

Skype ID: paul.quintos
Websites: iboninternational.org
peoplesgoals.org

Reclaim our future. Oppose the corporate “development” agenda

STATEMENT:
Reclaim our future.  Oppose the corporate “development” agenda

REQUEST FOR ORGANIZATIONAL ENDORSEMENTS BY AUGUST 7, 2015

Dear all,

In September of this year, Heads of States and Governments will gather at the United Nations (UN) headquarters in New York City to agree on a new set of “Sustainable Development Goals” (SDGs) and a “global plan of action for people, planet and prosperity”.  The latest draft of this declaration which promises to “transform our world” by 2030 and ensure that “no one will be left behind” in the process has just been released today.

However, many of these same governments, particularly the more powerful ones among them, are also currently negotiating new “free trade” deals that will have far-reaching implications for peoples in both the global North and South and for the future of the world economy and the planet.  Indeed, the top negotiators from 12 countries representing over 60% of the global economy are currently meeting in Hawaii, US desperately trying to conclude by the end of this week the transpacific partnership agreement (TPP), the largest “trade” agreement since the establishment of the WTO in 1994.

These agreements as they are currently framed and when adopted side-by-side, will not usher a new dawn for humanity.  Instead they are likely to further concentrate power and wealth in the hands of the 1% on the one hand, and deepen the dispossession, exploitation and oppression of peoples and environmental plunder on the other.

We need to let these governments know that we will not accept a “development” agenda that will serve as a vehicle for strengthening corporate power, re-legitimize the global capitalist growth model and perpetuate neoliberal globalization.

Please send organizational endorsements to the attached statement, with country, to April at secretariat@peoplesgoals.org, by Friday, August 7th.

And please share this widely…

Paul Quintos
IBON International
3rd Flr., IBON Center
114 Timog Avenue,
Quezon City 1103
Philippines
Telefax: +63 2 9276981

Skype ID: paul.quintos
Websites: iboninternational.org
peoplesgoals.org
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Your Comments on the Themes of the High Level Youth Policy Dialogue on SDGs

 

Dear Colleagues,

As you are aware, a High Level Youth Policy Dialogue on SDGs will be convened in July 2014 in Nairobi, Kenya. The meeting preparations are ongoing very well spearheaded by a Youth Steering Committee Co-Chaired by OAYouth and IFAPA.  Other members include youth organizations, representatives from 4 UN Agencies and the AU Youth Division.
The steering committee has come up with themes that will form the basis of the discussion in the dialogue and we want to solicit your input or comments The dialogue will be organized in form of plenary discussions, parallel sessions on different thematics, working groups and a cultural event. The dialogue will run for 3 days.
Below  are the thematic areas and session topics:
  1. Sustainable Development Goals in Context: What Role and Opportunities for African Youth?
  2. Full employment and access to decent work
  3. Education for Sustainable Development: African Youth Perspective
  4. Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development.
  5. Youth Civic Engagement, Peacebuilding and Political Participation
  6. Health and HIV/AIDS.
  7. Youth in the Age of Information Communications Technology and Innovations.
  8. Sustainable environment and addressing climate change.
Special Panel/Plenary Discussions:
  1. Assessing the AU African Youth Decade Plan of Action in the Context of AU Agenda 2063
  2. African Common Position on Post-2015 Agenda: Youth Key Asks
  3. African Youth and African Diaspora: A Dialogue Across Continents
  4. Youth and the Media
  5. Young + Aged Solidarity Dialogue: Integrating youth and older people into the Post 2015 Agenda Framework.
We will be glad to read your comments. Do these topics reflect the issues we young people want to be top priority in the post-2015 agenda? Any topic we should add or remove? 
Also, we would love your your suggestions on possible speakers we can invite to participate in the dialogue, particularly top level in person in organizations who are champions of the youth agenda.
And we expect to make the call for youth delegates in May.
Warm regards,

George Ndungu,
Secretary for International Affairs and Kenya Chairperson.
Organisation of African Youth (www.oayouth.org)
Executive Committee Member- Beyond 2015.

 

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SEPTEMBER – DECEMBER 2012

 

 

 

 

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Registration for the Youth Assembly at the UN New York, YA+11B to be

held on January 29 to February 1, 2013 is now OPEN.

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The fifty-seventh session of the Commission on the Status of Women will take place at United Nations Headquarters in New York from 4 to 15 March 2013

 

  • African Youth Conference on Post-2015 Development Agenda  http://www.aydac2012.org/  WM CR’s  will attend Nov 12-16th, 2012

 

  •   UN International Day of Peace   September 21

 

  • Education First ( INEESITE)     September 26 – October 10 th 2012

 

 

  • YALDA Youth Conference ,      October 4- 7th , Lagos

 

  • World Women Social Forum ,      November 1- 19 th 2012

 

  • UNFCCC , COP18 and World AIDS      Day – November 26- Dec 06th 2012 , Qatar

 

  •  To achieve UN MDGL’s we need to collaborate with partner to get towards a Sustainable

 

  •  Future for the betterment of the World    We remain humble to collaborators international

 

  •  International Youth Day 2012 Reports

 

                             Brief History of Worldview Mission  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Helene B-Card Ned-Suri Flag

Worldview Mission, Headquarter, “Kingdom of the Netherlands”

Contact Ms. Hélène H. Oord

Chair Fouder of  Worldview Mission to the United Nations   

PR-Media, Int’l  Relations Liaison to the United Nations

http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/

WM 2015-Action logo

http://www.action2015.org/

*Worldview Mission  is Standing Up ,* Taking Action* , **Making Noise for the United Nations MDGL’s !!!

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