2030 Agenda

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2030 Agenda JPEG

Transforming our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development web

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https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/transformingourworld/publication

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2030 SD Agenda: use Twitter to comment on the co-facilitators’ elements paper by Tuesday, 26 April

UN DESA NGO MAJOR GROUP & OTHER STAKEHOLDERS — FYI
From: Lotta Tahtinen <tahtinen@un.org>
Date: Fri, Apr 22, 2016
Subject: 2030 SD Agenda: use Twitter to comment on the co-facilitators’ elements paper by Tuesday, 26 April
To: Lotta Tahtinen <tahtinen@un.org>

Dear All,

Further to the below, Major Groups and other Stakeholders can also submit comments on the co-facilitators’ elements paper on Twitter using the hashtag #2030followup. The deadline to submit inputs via Twitter is Tuesday, 26 April, COB NYC time.

Kind regards, Lotta

Lotta Tähtinen | Stakeholder Engagement Programme Coordinator
Division for Sustainable Development | DESA
United Nations | Room S-2619 | Email: tahtinen@un.org
sustainabledevelopment.un.org

logo 2030 Sust Dev Goals

Dear All,

The co-facilitators of the General Assemby informal consultations on the follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda at the global level (Belize and Denmark) have prepared an elements paper which is available at: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/1002419-April_2030-Agenda-Follow-up-and-review-19-April-2016.pdf

The co-facilitators will convene informal consultations amongst Member States and stakeholders on Thursday, 28 April, at 3 p.m. in the Trusteeship Council Chamber, where they will invite Member States and relevant stakeholders to share their comments on the document. 

Representatives of major groups and other stakeholders who would like to speak at the meeting are kindly requested to sign up by completing the following form:http://goo.gl/forms/yEGuPw6CwJ

The interventions should not exceed 2 minutes and should focus on making concrete suggestions on the elements paper. The final determination of speakers and the order in which they will speak will be made by the co-facilitators based on the inscriptions received through this form. 

Please note that the Secretariat will not be able to provide any travel support to this meeting.  

Kind regards, Lotta
Lotta Tähtinen | Stakeholder Engagement Programme Coordinator
Division for Sustainable Development | DESA
United Nations | Room S-2619 | Email: tahtinen@un.org
sustainabledevelopment.un.org

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UN Catalytic Support to South-South & Triangular Cooperation in Implementing the Agenda 2030 (11-13 May, Istanbul)

Dear everyone,

Please share your thoughts and experience on how to mobilize partnerships and resources for the successful implementation of the Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Join us in Istanbul on 11-13 May 2016. This is followed by a 4-month coaching period on the topic. We will then gather in September in Bonn to discuss lessons learned, good practices, and case studies. This event is not only for UN Staff but also open to development practitioners. Please feel free to send me an email or call me over Skype if you have questions.

- Paulyn

I post our event invitation below:

The UNSSC Knowledge Centre for Sustainable Development is pleased to announce our new Course “UN Catalytic Support to South-South & Triangular Cooperation in Implementing the Agenda 2030” that enables you to mobilize additional partnerships and resources for its implementation. Join us on this innovative 3-stage learning journey!

11 – 13 May 2016, Istanbul, TURKEY STAGE 1
4-month Coaching Period, Online STAGE 2
27 -28 September 2016, Bonn, GERMANY STAGE 3

Why should I register?

South-South Cooperation is gaining growing relevance as the vehicle to accelerate development in the countries across the global South.  The United Nations can play an important catalytic role in further promoting South-South and Triangular Cooperation agendas of its Member States.

The course equips UN staff and development practitioners with a profound understanding of theory and practice of South-South and Triangular Cooperation, and provides them with tools and methodologies for practical support in mobilizing partnerships through South-South and Triangular Cooperation. A truly innovative component of the learning experience consists of a 4-month coaching period in which UN Country Teamss will be assisted to explore concrete opportunities and projects furthering their South-South agenda.

Content overview:
Stage 1
An initial 3-day face-to-face workshop focused on theory and practice of South-South Cooperation & Triangular Cooperation.

Stage 2
A 4-month coaching period provided under the guidance of the Regional UNOSSC team.

Stage 3
A 2-day knowledge and experience sharing workshop focused on lessons learned, good practice and case study development.

Register at http://www.unssc.org/home/activities/un-catalytic-support-south-south-and-triangular-cooperation-implementing-agenda-2030 or send us an email at sustainable-development@unssc.org<mailto:sustainable-development@unssc.org>.

Deadline for enrolment: 04 May 2016

Download Flyer: Catalytic Support to South-South & Triangular Cooperation in Implementing the Agenda 2030<http://www.unssc.org/home/activities/un-catalytic-support-south-south-and-triangular-cooperation-implementing-agenda-2030>

We are looking forward to your participation in this exciting learning opportunity!

All the best,

Paulyn Duman
Junior Knowledge Management Associate
UNSSC knowledge centre for sustainable development
Haus Carstanjen
Martin-Luther-King-Straße 8, Bonn 53175, Germany
Office:    +49 228 815 2661
Skype:    paulyn.duman
Email:    p.duman@unssc.org <mailto:p.vanweerelt@unssc.org

Visit sdg
https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=sdg

About sdg
http://www.iisd.ca/email/sdg/

More IISD RS Mailing Lists
http://www.iisd.ca/email/

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[Beyond 2015:501] Implementation of the Global 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in and by Germany

Implementation of the Global 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in and by Germany

Following a participative and comprehensive process over several years, in September 2015 the United Nations (UN) adopted the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs must now be implemented in and by Germany. It is our opinion that in order to do so, fundamentally different approaches must be taken in areas of political action. Germany must accept its responsibility for sustainable development and implement the 2030 Agenda in accordance with its five principles (people, planet, prosperity, peace, partnership). „Leave no one behind“ needs to be the central guiding principle of activities.

With this position paper, German civil society organisations adopt a joint position regarding the implementation of the 2030 Agenda in and by Germany. The paper reflects positions on the SDGs as represented in German civil society. It does not claim to be exhaustive. The co-signatory organisations and associations support the paper or parts of the paper in accordance with their mandates.

Please find attached and under this link a new position paper by German Civil Society Organisations. Feel free to share.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact us.

Best,

Cathrin Klenck and Marie-Luise Abshagen

Cathrin Klenck

Policy Officer Sustainable Development

German NGO Forum on Environment and Development

Marienstraße 19–20

10117 Berlin

Germany

Tel: +49 (0) 30 678 1775 74

Email: klenck@forumue.de

Web: http://www.forumue.de/en/home/


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UN Reflection Series 2016 on Middle Income Countries

Dear everyone,

We have received emails showing interest in the upcoming UN Reflection Series 2016 on 14 to 16 April in Berlin. Thank you to those who pointed out that a link in the previous email is broken.

Kindly allow me to share with you the event website: http://unreflection.unssc.org/

You can also see here the programme, list of speakers, workshops, and documents. Everyone should be able to access all the information and materials on the website.

You may also follow our Twitter account @UNSSCBonn and #UNRS2016 during the event to see key messages and also to engage with our speakers and panelists. You may also send us questions to the speakers.

For inquiries, please email me or sustainable-development@unssc.org or call us at +49 (0) 228 815 2657.

I am posting the previous email below. Thank you for your interest and we hope to see you at the event in Berlin.

Previous email:

Dear everyone,

This is the year we start implementing Agenda 2030. To ensure that coherence, coordination and integration are always present in our approaches to advance Agenda 2030, we need on-going conversations and strong collaboration among all relevant stakeholders.

The UN System Staff College Knowledge Centre for Sustainable Development, in collaboration with the Hertie School of Governance and UN DOCO, will provide a learning space to do so. From 14 to 16 of April, UN staff and development partners will convene at the UN Reflection Series in Berlin to engage in in-depth discussions and share knowledge on one of the most important target groups for Agenda 2030: Middle Income Countries.

Middle Income Countries are home to five of world’s seven billion people and 72% of the world’s poorest population. If we are not fully attentive to their development needs, we risk failing to ensure sustainable development by 2030.

How can we reconcile Middle Income Countries’ impressive growth rates with challenging inequality gaps? What are the best approaches to embrace traditional and emerging cooperation modalities and partnerships?

If you are involved in the development sector, would like to share your expertise as well as learn from others’ experiences, the UN Reflection Series 2016: Development Cooperation, Policy Advice and Middle Income Countries is an event you would not want to miss.

To grasp a better understanding of who is involved in this event and which specific themes will be covered, we invite you to visit our website at http://unreflection.unssc.org/

The UN Reflection Series provides an ideal environment for you to discuss with other practitioners and leaders in the development field on the best ways to advance sustainable development in Middle Income Countries. Take advantage of this opportunity and register now at http://www.unssc.org/home/activities/un-reflection-series-2016

Paulyn Duman

Junior Knowledge Management Associate

UN Staff CollegeUNSSC knowledge centre for sustainable development

Haus Carstanjen
Martin-Luther-King-Straße 8, Bonn 53175, Germany

Office:    +49 (0)228 815 2661

Cell:       +49 1515 940 9999

Skype:    paulyn.duman

Email:    p.duman@unssc.org

Website: www.unssc.org

More IISD RS Mailing Lists  /

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UN Catalytic Support to South-South & Triangular Cooperation in Implementing the Agenda 2030 (11-13 May, Istanbul)

Dear everyone,Please share your thoughts and experience on how to mobilize partnerships and resources for the successful implementation of the Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Join us in Istanbul on 11-13 May 2016. This is followed by a 4-month coaching period on the topic. We will then gather in September in Bonn to discuss lessons learned, good practices, and case studies. This event is not only for UN Staff but also open to development practitioners. Please feel free to send me an email or call me over Skype if you have questions.- Paulyn
I post our event invitation below:
=========The UNSSC Knowledge Centre for Sustainable Development is pleased to announce our new Course “UN Catalytic Support to South-South & Triangular Cooperation in Implementing the Agenda 2030” that enables you to mobilize additional partnerships and resources for its implementation. Join us on this innovative 3-stage learning journey!11 – 13 May 2016, Istanbul, TURKEY STAGE 1
4-month Coaching Period, Online STAGE 2
27 -28 September 2016, Bonn, GERMANY STAGE 3

Why should I register?

South-South Cooperation is gaining growing relevance as the vehicle to accelerate development in the countries across the global South.  The United Nations can play an important catalytic role in further promoting South-South and Triangular Cooperation agendas of its Member States.

The course equips UN staff and development practitioners with a profound understanding of theory and practice of South-South and Triangular Cooperation, and provides them with tools and methodologies for practical support in mobilizing partnerships through South-South and Triangular Cooperation. A truly innovative component of the learning experience consists of a 4-month coaching period in which UN Country Teamss will be assisted to explore concrete opportunities and projects furthering their South-South agenda.

Content overview:
Stage 1
An initial 3-day face-to-face workshop focused on theory and practice of South-South Cooperation & Triangular Cooperation.

Stage 2
A 4-month coaching period provided under the guidance of the Regional UNOSSC team.

Stage 3
A 2-day knowledge and experience sharing workshop focused on lessons learned, good practice and case study development.

Register at http://www.unssc.org/home/activities/un-catalytic-support-south-south-and-triangular-cooperation-implementing-agenda-2030 or send us an email at sustainable-development@unssc.org<mailto:sustainable-development@unssc.org>.

Deadline for enrolment: 04 May 2016

Download Flyer: Catalytic Support to South-South & Triangular Cooperation in Implementing the Agenda 2030<http://www.unssc.org/home/activities/un-catalytic-support-south-south-and-triangular-cooperation-implementing-agenda-2030>

We are looking forward to your participation in this exciting learning opportunity!

All the best,

Paulyn Duman
Junior Knowledge Management Associate
UNSSC knowledge centre for sustainable development
Haus Carstanjen
Martin-Luther-King-Straße 8, Bonn 53175, Germany
Office:    +49 228 815 2661
Skype:    paulyn.duman
Email:    p.duman@unssc.org <mailto:p.vanweerelt@unssc.org>
Website: www.unssc.org<http://www.unssc.org/>

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 GPF Watch

Global Policy Watch Briefing #10: 2030 Agenda and the SDGs: indicator framework, monitoring and reporting

Social Watch
Avda. 18 de Julio 2095/301
Montevideo 11200, Uruguay
socwatch@socialwatch.org
www.socialwatch.org

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Global Policy Forum
866 UN Plaza | Suite 4050 | New York, NY 10017 | USA
Koenigstrasse 37a | 53115 Bonn | Germany
gpf@globalpolicy.org
www.globalpolicy.org

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GPW#10_2016_03_18

If you are not Worldview Mission and would like to join the sdg Mailing List, please click here to SUBSCRIBE

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UNF Monthly Monitor: SG Candidates; Reviewing SDG Progress; Indicators; FfD; Positioning the UN for 2030

Please see below the UN Foundation’s Monthly Monitor for the latest in the race for the next UN Secretary-General; Reviewing progress on the SDGs; Indicators; FfD Follow up; and Positioning the UN for implementing the 2030 Agenda.
Kind regards,

Mara van Loggerenberg

Senior Manager, Policy Initiatives

United Nations Foundation

801 Second Avenue, 9th floor

New York, NY 10017

(212) 697-3315

www.unfoundation.org

 

Dear colleagues,
So far in this first year of the SDGs era, we’re already seeing pieces fall into place for implementation, as many countries and the UN have begun to try to transition from the Millennium Development Goals to Sustainable Development Goals and implement the 2030 agenda. We are also seeing challenges arise, as the reality of delivery begins to hit countries and gaps and tensions surface as we create delivery and review mechanisms for the goals. While the political will exists for translating what’s written in the agreements that were negotiated last year into programs and budgets, some countries are struggling to know where to begin and are awaiting for decisions and action from the UN and elsewhere – those are in progress, as noted below. Some countries have cited the difficulty of knowing how to deliver on an integrated indivisible agenda that avoids silo-ing within ministries, and developed and developing countries alike are struggling with capacity and other challenges relating to data and statistics to measure and track the goals. Finally, conversations about the global, regional, national, and local mechanisms to review progress are taking place in earnest, with several interesting proposals to make those processes simple but effective in determining and encouraging progress, and allowing course corrections as we learn from evidence and experience.

The race for Secretary-General (SG) is heating up in New York as well, with many acknowledging that one of the major challenges for the next SG will be her or his help with delivering on the SDGs and climate agreements; we’ve provided an update on the progress below, and would be interested to hear from you what you think the major priorities for the next SG should be. Please find below an update and analysis of these and other items, as well as an overview of key moments on the horizon and suggested readings.

All the Best,
Minh-Thu Pham
Executive Director of Policy, UNF

Monthly Monitor: SG Candidates; Reviewing SDG Progress; Indicators; FfD; Positioning the UN for 2030

The race for the next Secretary-General

As many of you know, the race for the next UN Secretary-General, who will take office on January 1, 2017, has begun in earnest, with seven candidates formally nominated so far. In response to calls for greater transparency, the President of the General Assembly (PGA) has invited all nominated candidates to participate in informal open hearings at UN Headquarters on April 12-14. The hearings are an opportunity for candidates to present their vision for the UN and field questions from member states and NGOs in a setting that is open to civil society and the media. This is a significant departure from previous selection processes, which have typically taken place behind closed doors among the 15 members of the UN Security Council; however, candidates still face a possible down vote from the permanent five (P5) members of the Security Council. Observers will be listening for views and ideas that candidates choose to share in this public forum. While many expect that the hearings are unlikely to stir controversy, they will be valuable in assessing temperament and ability of candidates to handle politically charged questions. A focus on substantive issues will also be welcome. There is also talk about additional public debates with the candidates outside of a formal UN setting.

Meanwhile, the General Assembly continues to discuss proposals to make changes to the process, such as instituting a single-term limit of seven years, a proposal supported by the 1 for 7 billion campaign, instead of having five‑year terms that can be renewed by the Security Council. They believe a single term could provide the Secretary-General greater freedom to act and speak without fear of reprisal from a member of the P5.

Current candidates include: Srgjan Kerim (Macedonia), Vesna Pusić (Croatia), Igor Lukšić (Montenegro), Danilo Türk (Slovenia), Irina Bokova (Bulgaria) and Natalia Gherman (Moldova). Most recently, Antonio Guterres (Portugal), former UN High Commissioner for Refugees was nominated, the first non-Eastern European candidate. Several other candidates are expected to come forward in the coming weeks.

Reviewing progress on the 2030 Agenda

The SDGs global follow-up and review process is meant to strengthen national implementation by providing ministers and other development actors a forum to determine global progress, exchange ideas, and learn lessons from one another. A main goal will be connecting what is happening at the local and national levels back up to the annual global-level reviews in New York. Similarly, regional organizations and mechanisms are well-positioned to provide insights on regional trends and peer learning. Additional questions relate to the role of analysis and data from outside sources such as research institutions and civil society. And some groups are considering ways to help citizens provide views on how well the SDGs are progressing, to increase and maintain citizen engagement and interest in the SDGs overtime.

Since the release of the Secretary-General’s report on follow up and review, member states and other observers are working to ensure that the High-Level Political Forum (“HLPF”) becomes an effective and engaging forum that will attract Ministers on an annual basis, where they can share lessons on what is working. The HLPF will meet at leaders’ level every four years, starting in 2019, in order to review and drive progress. Many have called for a coherent approach to SDG review, noting that various parts of the UN system should not try to “own” certain goals, but rather take a coordinated approach. Member states will also need to strike the right balance in structuring the annual themes of the review, so that they can give each SDG goal area sufficient focus, without reverting back into silo-ed thinking about individual goals. We expect that “Leave No One Behind” will be the theme for this year’s HLPF in mid-July and hope that this important topic is a focus of attention in years to come as well. On March 3, the PGA appointed Ambassador Lois Young of Belize and Ambassador Ib Petersen of Denmark to co-facilitate negotiations on the most critical questions related to the SDG follow up and review framework, while leaving room for flexibility to adapt, evolve, and to learn from experience over the next few years.

Indicators: not just for the statisticians

On March 11, the UN Statistical Commission agreed the indicators for the SDGs as a “practical starting point” and “subject to future technical refinement.” These caveats reflect recognition by member states that more time is required to refine several of the indicators. However, much like the debate over SDG targets in 2015, there are remaining tensions between the need for technical refinement and the risk of “reopening” the whole package and potentially losing ground on some hard-fought indicators.

Some experts in the global health community have expressed concerns over the revised Universal Health Coverage (UHC) indicator (3.8.2), which they say is a significantly weaker formulation that no longer measures financial risk protection. The indicator measures percent of the population covered by some form of insurance or social protection scheme but gives no indication of the quality of that protection and whether it effectively protects poor people from financial ruin caused by major medical expenses. Others are concerned over revised indicators for the Gender goal, which in some cases, are seen as less comprehensive in scope compared to the original versions. For example, the original indicator for sexual and reproductive health (5.6.2) measured: “the proportion of countries with laws and regulations that guarantee all women and adolescents access to sexual and reproductive health services, information and education” while the revised indicator adds an age caveat for such services, limiting them to women and girls aged 15-49. Advocates point out that an indicator for “all women and adolescents” could push policymakers to go beyond the status quo and measure those populations who have previously not been counted.

The precise way that these contentious issues are framed is integral to them being measured and reported on, especially by governments who may wish to overlook those issues that stretch them beyond their comfort zones. The indicators will shape whether and how targets get measured, making them relevant to us all, not only the statisticians. We expect these tensions to continue to play out in the months ahead.

Financing for Development Forum

The Financing for Development Forum will take place in New York from April 18-20, under the theme “Financing for sustainable development: follow-up to the Addis Ababa Action Agenda”. It will include a special high-level event with ECOSOC and the Bretton Woods Institutions, WTO, UNCTAD, and other stakeholders. The remaining days will be dedicated to reviewing the means of implementation for the 2030 Agenda, including the Addis Ababa Action Agenda. The Forum’s conclusions will be fed into the overall follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda through the HLPF.

Positioning the UN for 2030

Member states and a team of experts are currently grappling with how the UN needs to reform and adapt, especially in order to support countries to deliver on the 2030 Agenda in a tighter budget environment. The biggest issues include funding of the UN system, governance, and multi-stakeholder partnerships. On funding, many are pushing for more core funding for the UN rather than short-term funding for earmarked projects, which can hinder longer-term development planning, predictability, and flexibility and increase fragmentation. On multi-stakeholder partnerships, historical divisions over the UN’s engagement with the private sector continue, as some observers point out the need for greater member state oversight and accountability of partners, while others emphasize the need to leverage the expertise and comparative advantages of other sectors, particularly given the breadth and ambition of the new agenda. On governance, emerging powers are calling for a greater voice on the executive boards of UN bodies, to reflect the current geopolitical landscape and the fact that development is no longer only “North-South”. Some member states have also noted that the UN should “take a hard look at overlapping mandates” and that the UN seems to be the only place where mandates “never disappear.” An internal effort in the UN secretariat to examine existing mandates and how they may transition to the SDGs is ongoing, with a report to be released in the coming weeks.

To shed further light on how the UN development system should improve and function in the SDGs era, an Independent Team of Advisors will provide ideas to member states through June 2016. Juan Somavia of Chile and Klaus Töpfer of Germany were elected as co-chairs, and Sarah Cliffe, Director at NYU’s Center on International Cooperation, has been appointed Special Advisor on the ECOSOC Dialogue on longer-term positioning of the UN Development system.

Many agree on the need to bridge the UN’s development, humanitarian, and peacebuilding work; but the challenge is how to do so when the system is structured and funded in a way that tends to reinforce silos. In this constrained funding environment, concerns about how to respond effectively to humanitarian crises without losing focus on longer-term sustainable development have increased as more and more aid has been steered to address current crises. This issue is expected to be taken up at the World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul in May (see below for reading on humanitarian issues.)

Must Reads

  • The UN Secretary-General recently released One Humanity: Shared Responsibility, which elaborates on five core responsibilities to help frame stakeholder commitments at the World Humanitarian Summit in May, which many consider to be a test for how well the SDGs agenda can be accommodated with respect to crises on the global agenda. The report contains an ambitious “Agenda for Humanity” for governments, NGOs and the private sector, and Rahul Chandran of UN University argues that there is still time for the WHS to be a springboard for change. The High-Level Panel on Humanitarian Financing also released its report “Too Important to Fail—Addressing the Humanitarian Financing Gap,” examining resource gaps and how to improve the delivery and efficiency of humanitarian efforts and proposes a grand bargain between big donors and aid organizations to do so.

Look Ahead, 2016

If you are not worldview.mission@gmail.com and would

like to join the sdg Mailing List, please click here to SUBSCRIBE

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UNF Monthly Monitor: SG Candidates; Reviewing SDG Progress; Indicators; FfD; Positioning the UN for 2030

Please see below the UN Foundation’s Monthly Monitor for the latest in the race for the next UN Secretary-General; Reviewing progress on the SDGs; Indicators; FfD Follow up; and Positioning the UN for implementing the 2030 Agenda.

Kind regards,
Mara van Loggerenberg
Mara van Loggerenberg
Senior Manager, Policy Initiatives
United Nations Foundation
801 Second Avenue, 9th floor
New York, NY 10017
(212) 697-3315
Dear colleagues,So far in this first year of the SDGs era, we’re already seeing pieces fall into place for implementation, as many countries and the UN have begun to try to transition from the Millennium Development Goals to Sustainable Development Goals and implement the 2030 agenda. We are also seeing challenges arise, as the reality of delivery begins to hit countries and gaps and tensions surface as we create delivery and review mechanisms for the goals. While the political will exists for translating what’s written in the agreements that were negotiated last year into programs and budgets, some countries are struggling to know where to begin and are awaiting for decisions and action from the UN and elsewhere – those are in progress, as noted below. Some countries have cited the difficulty of knowing how to deliver on an integrated indivisible agenda that avoids silo-ing within ministries, and developed and developing countries alike are struggling with capacity and other challenges relating to data and statistics to measure and track the goals. Finally, conversations about the global, regional, national, and local mechanisms to review progress are taking place in earnest, with several interesting proposals to make those processes simple but effective in determining and encouraging progress, and allowing course corrections as we learn from evidence and experience.

The race for Secretary-General (SG) is heating up in New York as well, with many acknowledging that one of the major challenges for the next SG will be her or his help with delivering on the SDGs and climate agreements; we’ve provided an update on the progress below, and would be interested to hear from you what you think the major priorities for the next SG should be. Please find below an update and analysis of these and other items, as well as an overview of key moments on the horizon and suggested readings.

All the Best,
Minh-Thu Pham
Executive Director of Policy, UNF

Monthly Monitor: SG Candidates; Reviewing SDG Progress; Indicators; FfD; Positioning the UN for 2030

The race for the next Secretary-General

As many of you know, the race for the next UN Secretary-General, who will take office on January 1, 2017, has begun in earnest, with seven candidates formally nominated so far. In response to calls for greater transparency, the President of the General Assembly (PGA) has invited all nominated candidates to participate in informal open hearings at UN Headquarters on April 12-14. The hearings are an opportunity for candidates to present their vision for the UN and field questions from member states and NGOs in a setting that is open to civil society and the media. This is a significant departure from previous selection processes, which have typically taken place behind closed doors among the 15 members of the UN Security Council; however, candidates still face a possible down vote from the permanent five (P5) members of the Security Council. Observers will be listening for views and ideas that candidates choose to share in this public forum. While many expect that the hearings are unlikely to stir controversy, they will be valuable in assessing temperament and ability of candidates to handle politically charged questions. A focus on substantive issues will also be welcome. There is also talk about additional public debates with the candidates outside of a formal UN setting.

Meanwhile, the General Assembly continues to discuss proposals to make changes to the process, such as instituting a single-term limit of seven years, a proposal supported by the 1 for 7 billion campaign, instead of having five‑year terms that can be renewed by the Security Council. They believe a single term could provide the Secretary-General greater freedom to act and speak without fear of reprisal from a member of the P5.

Current candidates include: Srgjan Kerim (Macedonia), Vesna Pusić (Croatia), Igor Lukšić (Montenegro), Danilo Türk (Slovenia), Irina Bokova (Bulgaria) and Natalia Gherman (Moldova). Most recently, Antonio Guterres (Portugal), former UN High Commissioner for Refugees was nominated, the first non-Eastern European candidate. Several other candidates are expected to come forward in the coming weeks.

Reviewing progress on the 2030 Agenda

The SDGs global follow-up and review process is meant to strengthen national implementation by providing ministers and other development actors a forum to determine global progress, exchange ideas, and learn lessons from one another. A main goal will be connecting what is happening at the local and national levels back up to the annual global-level reviews in New York. Similarly, regional organizations and mechanisms are well-positioned to provide insights on regional trends and peer learning. Additional questions relate to the role of analysis and data from outside sources such as research institutions and civil society. And some groups are considering ways to help citizens provide views on how well the SDGs are progressing, to increase and maintain citizen engagement and interest in the SDGs overtime.

Since the release of the Secretary-General’s report on follow up and review, member states and other observers are working to ensure that the High-Level Political Forum (“HLPF”) becomes an effective and engaging forum that will attract Ministers on an annual basis, where they can share lessons on what is working. The HLPF will meet at leaders’ level every four years, starting in 2019, in order to review and drive progress. Many have called for a coherent approach to SDG review, noting that various parts of the UN system should not try to “own” certain goals, but rather take a coordinated approach. Member states will also need to strike the right balance in structuring the annual themes of the review, so that they can give each SDG goal area sufficient focus, without reverting back into silo-ed thinking about individual goals. We expect that “Leave No One Behind” will be the theme for this year’s HLPF in mid-July and hope that this important topic is a focus of attention in years to come as well. On March 3, the PGA appointed Ambassador Lois Young of Belize and Ambassador Ib Petersen of Denmark to co-facilitate negotiations on the most critical questions related to the SDG follow up and review framework, while leaving room for flexibility to adapt, evolve, and to learn from experience over the next few years.

Indicators: not just for the statisticians

On March 11, the UN Statistical Commission agreed the indicators for the SDGs as a “practical starting point” and “subject to future technical refinement.” These caveats reflect recognition by member states that more time is required to refine several of the indicators. However, much like the debate over SDG targets in 2015, there are remaining tensions between the need for technical refinement and the risk of “reopening” the whole package and potentially losing ground on some hard-fought indicators.

Some experts in the global health community have expressed concerns over the revised Universal Health Coverage (UHC) indicator (3.8.2), which they say is a significantly weaker formulation that no longer measures financial risk protection. The indicator measures percent of the population covered by some form of insurance or social protection scheme but gives no indication of the quality of that protection and whether it effectively protects poor people from financial ruin caused by major medical expenses. Others are concerned over revised indicators for the Gender goal, which in some cases, are seen as less comprehensive in scope compared to the original versions. For example, the original indicator for sexual and reproductive health (5.6.2) measured: “the proportion of countries with laws and regulations that guarantee all women and adolescents access to sexual and reproductive health services, information and education” while the revised indicator adds an age caveat for such services, limiting them to women and girls aged 15-49. Advocates point out that an indicator for “all women and adolescents” could push policymakers to go beyond the status quo and measure those populations who have previously not been counted.

The precise way that these contentious issues are framed is integral to them being measured and reported on, especially by governments who may wish to overlook those issues that stretch them beyond their comfort zones. The indicators will shape whether and how targets get measured, making them relevant to us all, not only the statisticians. We expect these tensions to continue to play out in the months ahead.

Financing for Development Forum

The Financing for Development Forum will take place in New York from April 18-20, under the theme “Financing for sustainable development: follow-up to the Addis Ababa Action Agenda”. It will include a special high-level event with ECOSOC and the Bretton Woods Institutions, WTO, UNCTAD, and other stakeholders. The remaining days will be dedicated to reviewing the means of implementation for the 2030 Agenda, including the Addis Ababa Action Agenda. The Forum’s conclusions will be fed into the overall follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda through the HLPF.

Positioning the UN for 2030

Member states and a team of experts are currently grappling with how the UN needs to reform and adapt, especially in order to support countries to deliver on the 2030 Agenda in a tighter budget environment. The biggest issues include funding of the UN system, governance, and multi-stakeholder partnerships. On funding, many are pushing for more core funding for the UN rather than short-term funding for earmarked projects, which can hinder longer-term development planning, predictability, and flexibility and increase fragmentation. On multi-stakeholder partnerships, historical divisions over the UN’s engagement with the private sector continue, as some observers point out the need for greater member state oversight and accountability of partners, while others emphasize the need to leverage the expertise and comparative advantages of other sectors, particularly given the breadth and ambition of the new agenda. On governance,emerging powers are calling for a greater voice on the executive boards of UN bodies, to reflect the current geopolitical landscape and the fact that development is no longer only “North-South”. Some member states have also noted that the UN should “take a hard look at overlapping mandates” and that the UN seems to be the only place where mandates “never disappear.” An internal effort in the UN secretariat to examine existing mandates and how they may transition to the SDGs is ongoing, with a report to be released in the coming weeks.

To shed further light on how the UN development system should improve and function in the SDGs era, an Independent Team of Advisorswill provide ideas to member states through June 2016. Juan Somavia of Chile and Klaus Töpfer of Germany were elected as co-chairs, and Sarah Cliffe, Director at NYU’s Center on International Cooperation, has been appointed Special Advisor on the ECOSOC Dialogue on longer-term positioning of the UN Development system.

Many agree on the need to bridge the UN’s development, humanitarian, and peacebuilding work; but the challenge is how to do so when the system is structured and funded in a way that tends to reinforce silos. In this constrained funding environment, concerns about how to respond effectively to humanitarian crises without losing focus on longer-term sustainable development have increased as more and more aid has been steered to address current crises. This issue is expected to be taken up at the World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul in May (see below for reading on humanitarian issues.)

Must Reads

  • The UN Secretary-General recently released One Humanity: Shared Responsibility, which elaborates on five core responsibilities to help frame stakeholder commitments at the World Humanitarian Summit in May, which many consider to be a test for how well the SDGs agenda can be accommodated with respect to crises on the global agenda. The report contains an ambitious “Agenda for Humanity” for governments, NGOs and the private sector, and Rahul Chandran of UN University argues that there is still time for the WHS to be a springboard for change. The High-Level Panel on Humanitarian Financing also released its report “Too Important to Fail—Addressing the Humanitarian Financing Gap,” examining resource gaps and how to improve the delivery and efficiency of humanitarian efforts and proposes a grand bargain between big donors and aid organizations to do so.

Look Ahead

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Request for materials to support national level capacity building of MGoS in the 2030 SD agenda follow-up

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Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

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TO UN DESA NGO MAJOR GROUP & OTHER STAKEHOLDERS 

​ Here is an opportunity to feature your reports, tool kits, workshops, blogs, and other publications about national experiences from communities related to the Agenda 2030​ through the UN DESA Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform.

Please send your materials directly to UN consultant Alessandra Nilo at alessandra.nilo@gestos.org

by Thursday, 28 January. For more information see below.

Alessandra Nilo <alessandra.nilo@gestos.org>
Date: Thu, Jan 21, 2016
Subject: Re: Jeff
To: Jeffery Huffines <jvhuffines@gmail.com>

Dear colleagues:​

As you may be aware, the UNDESA has created a new page in the (https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/majorgroups/national-capacity-building) website to share information about the National experiences from communities related to the Agenda 2030.

At the moment,  they are seeking communication – content prepared by communities about the 2030 Agenda (and related pos-2015 processes) to be published in this new space, which will reach strategic audiences worldwide.

Therefore, if you have materials – such as blogs, publications, workshops contents, leaflets, posters, anything, in any language, please kindly share it with me (alessandra.nilo@gestos.org)

I will be receiving a first group of materials until Thursday, January 28th – as part of my role as consultant for this specific project.

By the way, please see below the last updated information shared by UN DESA on the project to support national level engagement of MGoS in the 2030 SD agenda. Thank you!

Best regards,

Alessandra Nilo

General Coordinator- GESTOS

From: hlpf-working-group@googlegroups.com [mailto:hlpf-working-group@googlegroups.comOn Behalf Of Lotta Tahtinen


Sent:
 Tuesday, January 12, 2016


To:
 hlpf-working-group@googlegroups.com
Cc:
 Nikhil Chandavarkar <chandavarkar@un.org>; Beppe Lovoi <lovoi@un.org>; Isabela Cunha <cunhai@un.org>; Alessandra Nilo <alessandra.nilo@gestos.org>
Subject:
 Update from DSD on activities to support national level engagement of MGoS in the 2030 SD agenda follow-up

 

Dear colleagues,

 

We would like to convey our sincere appreciation for the significant role that major groups and other stakeholders have played in the development of the new 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Achieving this new Agenda in each country will depend on how effectively all stakeholders can contribute to its implementation and participate in reviews at all levels.

With generous support from the EC-funded SD2015 project, DSD is in the process of developing materials and tools to support stakeholder engagement in the follow-up and review at the national level. We would invite you to visit our website (https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/majorgroups/national-capacity-building) for further information. Also, as you may be aware, DSD has been working together with UNITAR and relevant UN country teams to support initially a number of developing countries to align their national development strategies with the 2030 Agenda. We have also strived to engage stakeholders in these pilot efforts while the final decision on participation has rested with the relevant government and the UN country teams.

In addition, we are also envisaging a number of country-level stakeholder workshops to enable stakeholders to come together to discuss and strategize their future engagement in the implementation, review and follow-up of the agenda at the country level. The envisaged workshops are:

·        Jordan 31 January – 1 February 2016 (tbc)
·        Togo (spring 2016 dates tbc)
·        Morocco (spring 2016 dates tbc)

While several of these activities continue to evolve, we plan to engage active and relevant stakeholder networks as much as possible.  You may continue to refer to us your relevant partners and colleagues at the national level who would be interested to participate in these activities.

We will add all names received to our mailing list and provide regular updates along the way.

We look forward to your sustained engagement, and your assistance in promoting these activities through your networks.

Kind regards, Lotta

Lotta Tähtinen | Stakeholder Engagement Programme Coordinator
Division for Sustainable Development | DESA
United Nations | Room S-2619 | Email: tahtinen@un.org
Tel: +1 (917) 367-2212 | sustainabledevelopment.un.org

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Lotta Tahtinen <tahtinen@un.org>
Date: Thu, Jan 21, 2016
Subject: 2030 SD Agenda: Report of the Secretary-General on Critical milestones towards coherent, efficient and inclusive follow-up and review at the global level
To: Lotta Tahtinen <tahtinen@un.org>

Dear All,

An advance unedited copy of the report of the Secretary-General on the critical milestones towards coherent, efficient and inclusive follow-up and review of the 2030 sustainable development agenda at the global level is now available at: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/hlpf

This report will be issued shortly as a document of the General Assembly in the six official languages of the UN and posted on our website.

Kind regards, Lotta

Lotta Tähtinen | Stakeholder Engagement Programme Coordinator
Division for Sustainable Development | DESA
United Nations | Room S-2619 | Email: tahtinen@un.org
sustainabledevelopment.un.org

           

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South Bulletin: UN Summit adopts the 2030 Development Agenda

View this email in your browser

South Bulletin31 December 2015Published by the South Centre
Dear Pamela Puntenney,

United Nations Summit adopts the 2030 Development Agenda

Dear Readers,

The United Nations held a Development Summit on 25-27 September, attended by many top political leaders. The Summit adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which will have a major impact on how development will be dissected and monitored in the UN and at country level in the next 15 years. The centrepiece of the 2030 Agenda is the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The following articles are included in the bulletin:

  • UN Summit adopts the 2030 Development Agenda
  • SDGs – a Course Correction?
  • World leaders affirm commitment for Agenda 2030

After the UN Summit on the post-2015 development agenda, leaders of the UN Member States reconvened again on 28 September – 3 October to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the UN:

  • UN Celebrates 70th Anniversary
  • Near universal support to end US embargo on Cuba

Other articles in the bulletin are on the South Centre side event during the UN’s Third International Conference on Financing for Development and the Statement of the Centre to the 2015 WIPO Assemblies.

We hope you find this bulletin interesting and we welcome your comments.

With best wishes,
Martin Khor
Executive Director,
South Centre and
Editor, South Bulletin

To download the entire South Bulletin, please click here. To read individual articles, please see below.

Dear Pamela Puntenney,

United Nations Summit adopts the 2030 Development Agenda

Dear Readers,

The United Nations held a Development Summit on 25-27 September, attended by many top political leaders. The Summit adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which will have a major impact on how development will be dissected and monitored in the UN and at country level in the next 15 years. The centrepiece of the 2030 Agenda is the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The following articles are included in the bulletin:

  • UN Summit adopts the 2030 Development Agenda
  • SDGs – a Course Correction?
  • World leaders affirm commitment for Agenda 2030

After the UN Summit on the post-2015 development agenda, leaders of the UN Member States reconvened again on 28 September – 3 October to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the UN:

  • UN Celebrates 70th Anniversary
  • Near universal support to end US embargo on Cuba

Other articles in the bulletin are on the South Centre side event during the UN’s Third International Conference on Financing for Development and the Statement of the Centre to the 2015 WIPO Assemblies.

We hope you find this bulletin interesting and we welcome your comments.

With best wishes,
Martin Khor
Executive Director,
South Centre and
Editor, South Bulletin

To download the entire South Bulletin, please click here. To read individual articles, please see below.

South Centre Website: http://www.SouthCentre.int (English, French, Spanish)
(South Centre Blog and South Centre DigitalTV)
Copyright © 2015 South Centre, All rights reserved.
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