Climate Change

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CLIMATE CHANGE

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climate change – Kiribati

Dear Colleagues,

“Climate change is threatening the livelihoods of the people

of tiny Kiribati, and even the island nation’s existence.

The government is making plans for the island’s demise.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/03/world/asia/climate-change-kiribati.html?_r=0

All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UNSD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change

__________________

Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell:  1-734-352-7429
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a few interesting blogs on climate change, SDGs and Angry Bird

Dear Colleagues,

If you are interested in the Nexus: Water, Food, Energy and Climate then this book is for you. Edited by Felix Dodds and Jamie Bartram and the Forewords by HRH Prince of Wales, Paula Cabellero Gomez and Albert ButareMore information at: http://blog.felixdodds.net/2016/04/new-book-out-edited-by-felix-dodds-and.html

You will also find -  I hope – some useful blogs on climate change, SDGs and other sustainable development issues on my blog. Also an interesting decision by the UN Secretary General regarding Angry Bird all at http://blog.felixdodds.net/

Warmest regards,
 Felix Dodds
@felixdodds
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ceenario – Science Express Climate Action Special

Click to view online

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Climate Change

Browser Version

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Opportunity: MIT lab oprnd 10 contests on Climate Change

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

 
The MIT lab ran a pilot contest on this approach in 2015, with Henry Paulson, former U.S. Secretary of Treasury and former CEO of Goldman Sachs; Andrew Steer, the president of the World Resources Institute (WRI); and Janos Pasztor, then-current United Nations Assistant Secretary-General, looking to engage thousands of people to help build successful national and global climate action plans.  To learn more about the set of contests, seeking high-impact proposals on how people, organizations and governments can tackle major climate challenges, go to 
 
All the Best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UNSD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change
__________________
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell: +1-(734) 352•7429
Landline: +1-(734) 994•3612

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Who’s in Line to be the Next UN Climate Change Chief, 2016

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

The discussion has begun around who will be the next UN Climate Change Chief.  As this article reports, “The UN wants an official with ‘high professional standing and an intimate knowledge of the issues’ to replace Christiana Figueres when she leaves in 2016 July.”  As you can see from this impressive short list, there are a number of qualified candidates.  For those of you who were on delegation for COP 20 in Lima, Peru, the President of the COP – the Peruvian Minister of Environment, Manuel Pulgar Vidal is on the list.  To learn more about the candidates, http://www.climatechangenews.com/2016/02/23/whos-in-line-to-be-the-next-un-climate-change-chief/
Christiana Figueres was not only personable, knew her business regarding the issues, UNFCCC and the UN on Climate Change from formal procedures to encouraging processes and engagement, as a leader of the 21st century, she made herself available, held meetings with stakeholders bringing the key staff to assist with the dialogue, stating what was possible, etc., ending with action items.  This is the way forward, let’s hope the selection of the next Chief will give us an equally qualified leader.
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UNSD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change
__________________
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell: +1-(734) 352•7429
Landline: +1-(734) 994•3612

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Climage Marches Around the World

Ban Ki-Moon, Officials & others during Others Climate March 2015, Geneva

People-take-part-in-a-climate

I went on climate march today.. we had very good turnout, folks of all ages, including several strollers (with babies :) ))  lots of good signage…
have a SAFE/productive trip… ciao/kathy
What happened today in your part of the world?
All the best,
UNSD Education Caucus
Climate Change Co-Coordinators Delegation

Arthur Dahl <dahla@bluewin.ch>

Subject: Re:Climate Marches Around the World
Date: November 29, 2015
To: Pamela Puntenney <pjpunt@umich.edu>
We had an excellent climate march in Geneva, Switzerland on Saturday, with 5,000 participating. My photos are at http://yabaha.net/dahl/travel/tswiss/2015Climate_march/Climate_march2015.html and the official photos at http://climat21.ch/photos.html.
We are off to Paris this week for our four events at COP21 (http://iefworld.org/cop21).
Arthur
On 30 Nov 2015, at 00:07, Pamela Puntenney wrote:
I went on climate march today.. we had very good turnout, folks of all ages, including several strollers (with babies :) ))  lots of good signage…

have a SAFE/productive trip… ciao/kathy

What happened today in your part of the world?

All the best,
UNSD Education Caucus
Climate Change Co-Coordinators Delegation
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Arthur Lyon Dahl Ph.D., President
International Environment Forum
12B Chemin de Maisonneuve
CH-1219 Chatelaine, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel: +41 (0)22 797 0211
E-mail: ief@iefworld.org or dahla@bluewin.ch
http://iefworld.org/ and http://yabaha.net/dahl
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Maybe Climate Skeptics are more fun

Who knew Judith Curry could star in a comedy? Maybe she could do standup with Lord Monckton

Climate skeptics offer ‘cinematic proof’ that warming is a sham

Jean Chemnick, E&E reporter

Published: Tuesday, December 8, 2015

PARIS — Climate skeptics donned tuxedos and walked the red carpet yesterday night to ridicule the quest for a global deal on greenhouse gases now underway in a suburb of the French capital.

 unnamed

Paris Climate Talks provides in-depth coverage of the 21st U.N. summit to forge a new global agreement to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Visit the special report.

The American climate skeptic group Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow, or CFACT, supported by the Association of French Climate Optimists and other Gallic disputers of man-made climate change, released its film “Climate Hustle,” which attempts to make the case that the scientific community and political activists are deliberately misrepresenting the science of warming.

The gala in a century-old cinema on a side street in central Paris came as U.N. talks entered their second tense week with hopes of producing an agreement on emissions and finance sometime during the weekend.

But the mood at Cinéma du Panthéon was decidedly more festive than the one now prevailing at the conference facility at Le Bourget, where 40,000 participants are buckling down for a long slog. The film premier brought out climate skeptic luminaries, a few bemused Parisians, some protesters and a friendly polar bear who apparently didn’t feel himself to be at all endangered by rising temperatures linked to fossil fuel combustion.

In attendance was Lord Christopher Monckton, a British peer who in 2012 was ejected from climate negotiations in Doha, Qatar, after he impersonated a delegate from the climate-vulnerable nation of Myanmar in order to address the plenary on the subject of why climate change isn’t happening.

At an opening reception that was heavily weighted toward French cheese plates, Marc Morano, a former aide to Sen. James Inhofe (R-Okla.) and publisher of the skeptic blog Climate Depot, offered the film as “cinematic proof that the great global warming calamity has been canceled.”

CFACT founding President David Rothbard told the crowd that the international exercise underway in an airfield a few miles out of town is pointless because the link between human-caused emissions and warming is no more established than when the Kyoto Protocol was negotiated 18 years ago.

“The science was not settled in 1997, and the science is not settled today,” he said.

Founding Executive Director Craig Rucker said the idea of making a film occurred to the group when it saw its “adversary” Greenpeace produce one in the 1990s.

A comedy?

The film was billed as a comedy. But aside from some scenes where Rothbard and Rucker are “hustled” by a recurring street con man character playing a game called three-card monte with an ace up his sleeve — apparently a metaphor for climate scientists — it reads more as a documentary of relatively modest budget.

unnamed-5Marc Morano poses ironically with a polar bear at a climate skeptics’ movie event on the outskirts of the Paris climate summit. Photo by Jean Chemnick.

It leans heavily on well-known contrarian climate scientists including Judith Curry, Patrick Moore and Bob Carter — many of whom attended the premiere — to make the claims frequently cited by climate skeptics. To wit, carbon dioxide is plant food; global warming has paused for the past decade and a half; and the medieval warming period explains warming, while the current climate is historically cool and the atmosphere “famished” for carbon. Climate scientists are a clique who resist ideas that conflict with their assumptions.

Venance Journé, a climate researcher with France’s National Scientific Research Council, said she somehow was added to one of the ally groups’ email lists and came out of curiosity.

She said it is important to understand all points of view in the climate discussion.

“If people who disagree separate from each other, how can you progress?” she said.

Journé, who has worked in this area for 25 years, said evidence that man-made greenhouse gas emissions were driving warming existed in the 1960s and has only strengthened since then.

“We have to have an agreement,” she said.

But Paraguayan farmer Albrecht Glatzle, who said he was in Paris representing other Paraguayan farmers concerned about how greenhouse gas restraints could affect their operations, said the science of climate change is far from settled.

Glatzle said he is convinced that methane from livestock plays no role in driving atmospheric warming. And he said carbon dioxide makes his crops healthier.

“As a farmer, CO2 is an ally, not an enemy,” he said.

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[The IECA] Blog post: Climate change solitudes and absence in closed systems

IECA Subscriptions <noreply@theieca.org>
Date: Tue, Dec 8, 2015
Subject: [The IECA] Blog post: Climate change solitudes and absence in closed systems
To: ibci@umich.edu

~ This is a BLOG post from The IECA ~
~ Please do NOT reply to this email ~
~ Login and reply on the IECA site using the link below ~

Posted by: Chui-Ling Tam, Tuesday, December 8, 2015
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[This post is part of a series offered by IECA members attending COP21 in
Paris.]Sat today by some giant translucent animal figurines for that most furtive
and fleeting of COP21 activities – eating lunch – I was approached by a
graduate student distributing a questionnaire that has made the annual round
of climate change negotiations since COP13 in Bali in 2007, an event that
some identify as the pivotal point at which The Blue Economy entered the
global lexicon, with its emphasis on oceans.I was fresh from an exhilarating session where luminous women leaders spoke
of the absence of women in climate change. French ecology, sustainable
development and energy minister Ségolène Royal, environmental
activist-scholar Vandana Shiva, former Irish president and UNHCR chief Mary
Robinson, Oxfam’s executive director Winnie Byanyima and film director
Marie-Monique Robin had held a room rapt with their defiant and poignant
stories of progress and retreat. The room rippled with shocked disapproval
when Byanyima recounted her experience at the Bali talks, when, in response
to her complaint about the absence of physical space set aside for women to
hold meetings, the then U.N. climate chief told her the negotations were a
highly political and technical affair, with the implication that COP was not
a space where women belonged. Today was gender day at COP21.Yesterday, I had sat in an afternoon session where some of the biggest
advocates for oceans in climate change presented nine recommendations from
last week’s Oceans Day in Paris. Chief among those was a demand that oceans
be specifically addressed in the text of the Paris agreement. From space,
stated the eloquent Angus Friday, Ambassador of Grenada to the U.S., the
earth looks blue; it was more Mother Water than Mother Earth. Marine space is
inseparable from climate change.On the weekend, while touring the COP21 Climate Generations area in the green
zone open to the general public, three women standing nearby had punctured my
jetlagged stupor with a heated discussion of the absence of youth in climate
change. There are actually plenty of young people and several youth-centred
sessions at COP21, but these women (some of whom were almost certainly old
enough to be parents themselves) roundly dismissed the fact of climate
decisions being made by old men who would not be around to suffer the
consequences of those decisions. The absence of youth from the climate change
policy conversation was morally and practically untenable.In my time at COP21, I have listened to belligerent declarations by national
and regional political leaders at the High Level Segment of the Paris
meetings. It is impossible not to see the huge gulf that divides the
developed countries from the developing countries. The latter can number the
Group of 77 plus China, the Small Island Developing States, the Least
Developed Countries. While the coalition of the world’s poor speaks a
language of overdue action, overwhelming frequency and ferocity of
environmental hazards, and inadequate capacity to cope with climate change,
the world’s rich countries are talking about energy efficiencies to
support sustainable lifestyles. Debate swirls around the nature of innovation
and its place in saving the one space we all share.Today, as I bit into my sandwich, the graduate student handed me a survey
seeking COP participants’ opinions on effective strategies for climate
change and priority areas for mitigation efforts. The questions covered
common themes invoked in these talks. Technological innovations, government
regulations, economic models. Wider audience, government, organizations.
Forestry, agriculture, energy.  Nowhere were oceans, women or youth
mentioned. When marginal places and marginal peoples are absent, it limits
the possibility for just implementation of climate change mitigation and
adaptation.So, on my fourth day in Paris, I am reminded of Hugh McLennan’s 1945 novel
/Two Solitudes/, which signifies Canada’s struggle with its dual
Francophone and Anglophone identities. In the text of climate change and the
spaces of climate change negotiation, there is a struggle between
multiple solitudes that obstruct communication and understanding. Thirty
years ago, Niklas Luhmann argued that different communities and policy
cultures develop their internal coherency through mutually exclusive
languages. Such closed systems are signified by the spatial and textual
absence of women, oceans, youth and the world’s poor from the dominant
language of climate change. The test of COP21 in Paris will be whether it
can reconcile multiple solitudes to include multiple marginalized people and
places.

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Climate Change — Call for public comments on proposed JCM projects for Indonesia (28 November to 27 December 2015)

Dear Colleagues,

The Joint Crediting Mechanism (JCM) secretariat between Indonesia and Japan cordially invites all the stakeholders to provide their comments on the following proposed JCM projects:
“Energy Saving for Air-Conditioning at Textile Factory by Introducing High-efficiency Centrifugal Chiller in Karawang, West Java ”
“Energy Saving for Air-Conditioning at Textile Factory by Introducing High-efficiency Centrifugal Chiller in Batang, Central Java (Phase 2)”

For details of the public comments, please visit:
https://www.jcm.go.jp/id-jp/information/127

http://www.jcmindonesia.com/en/projects/public-comment
http://www.jcmindonesia.com/id/proyek/komentar-publik

For more information on the JCM between Indonesia and Japan, please visit:
https://www.jcm.go.jp/id-jp
http://www.jcmindonesia.com/

Kind regards,
The JCM secretariat between Indonesia and Japan

The Japanese side secretariat: id-pdd-pi@jcm.go.jp (for public comments)

The Indonesian side secretariat: secretariat@jcmindonesia.com

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Major Economies Forum Discusses Elements of a Legally-Binding Climate Agreement

Dear UN SD Education Caucus Climate Change Friends and Colleagues,


19 July 2015: At its 22nd meeting, the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate (MEF) focused on issues related to the global climate change agreement that is expected to be adopted at the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 21) to the UNFCCC. The participating economies, mostly represented at the ministerial level, discussed their views on the legal form and contents of the agreement. Despite diverse positions on these aspects, the co-chairs called the meeting “productive” and “very constructive.”
In anticipation of COP 21, which will take place on 30 November – 11 December 2015, in Paris, France, ministers discussed which elements of the agreement should be legally binding with a view to creating a common approach to challenges and achieve convergence. Four sessions were held over the two-day meeting: one on adaptation; two on mitigation; and one on transparency. Issues related to financial support were discussed over a working dinner.  To learn more:
We ask, what one recommendation would you make in terms of the legally binding elements with a view to environmental education and achieving convergence?

All the best,

Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
Co-Chairs, UN SD Education Caucus
Co-Coordinators, Climate Change
__________________
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell: +1-(734) 352•7429
Landline: +1-(734) 994•3612

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ADP – New Negotiating Text Out for Climate Change – Non-Paper by Co-Chairs

Dear Climate Change Friends and Colleagues,

From the decision 1/CP.17, the COP decided to adopt a protocol, another legal instrument or an agreed outcome with legal force under the Convention (UNFCCC) applicable to all Parties at its twenty-first session.  We continue to follow the progress contributing where appropriate.  To stay abreast of the news and the work of the UNFCCC, go to  http://newsroom.unfccc.int/ the upper right of the page is a link to UNFCCC process and meetings.
For those of you who are following the evolution of the Ad Hoc – Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action 9ADP) you will have read the Non-Paper containing the basis for negotiation of the draft Paris climate package, an informal document outlining potential agreed upon formal procedures, from the Co-Chairs [October 5, 2015].  For those of you that haven’t had an opportunity yet, the document has been posted.
(9 pages for the agreement, 11 for the COP decision): http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2015/adp2/eng/8infnot.pdf
In preparation for COP 21, the 11th part of the second session of the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (ADP) will be held in Bonn, Germany, October 19-23, 2015, to learn more http://unfccc.int/2860.php
Links:
NEW! Co-Chairs’ non-paper containing the basis for negotiation of the draft Paris climate package
ADP.2015.8.InformalNoteMS Word version of ADP.2015.8.InformalNoteNEW! Draft decision on workstream 2 of the ADP
ADP.2015.9.InformalNote

MS Word version of ADP.2015.9.InformalNote

NEW! Scenario note by the Co-Chairs on the eleventh part of the second session of the ADP
ADP.2015.7.InformalNote

 CALL FOR INPUT
Scanning the Non-Paper, the UNSD Education Caucus policy briefing on “Preparing Society for Climate Change” 2nd paragraph would fit as an additional preambular paragraph; Articles #2 (Purpose) and #4 (Adaptation) speak to the elements of environmental education and society.  Attached is a copy of our policy briefing.  As you read the informal note, send us your comments and suggestions, be specific as possible.

All the best,

Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UNSD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change
with Tiahoga Ruge, Jim Taylor, Tich Pesanayi, Suzana Padua, Kavita Myles
Youth:  Fumi Kikuyama, Meg Daupan
Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell: +1-(734) 352•7429
Landline: +1-(734) 994•3612

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ADP Co-Chairs Scenario Note for August: New Tool for Negotiations

Dear Climate Change Colleagues, 

 
For those of you following the negotiations, we wanted to bring  your attention to the new ADP Co-Chairs Informal Scenario Note, which is long, but very important for the next steps in the negotiations. http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2015/adp2/eng/4infnot.pdf 
 
From the reports covering Bonn, while Parties supported the Co-Chairs streamlining process, it was noted many expressed frustration with the slow process.  During the final days it was requested that the Co-Chairs develop a ‘tool’ in the form of a non-paper to further guide their work. The February Geneva Negotiating Text (GNT) is still the formal basis for negotiations but it is anticipated the new tool will have a substantial impact in guiding next steps. 
 
It divides the current negotiating text in three sections: 
 
1. “Draft agreement”- Provisions that are, by their nature, appropriate for inclusion in an agreement (e.g. overarching commitments, durable provisions and standard provisions for an agreement)
 
2. “Draft decision”- Provisions that are, by their nature, appropriate for inclusion in a decision (e.g. details of implementation, provisions likely to change over time, provisions related to pre-2020 actions and interim arrangements pending entry into force of the agreement)
 
3. “Provisions whose placement requires further clarity among Parties in relation to the draft agreement or draft decision”- We are convinced that Part Three of the tool contains issues that are central to the agreement and need to be addressed. Following consultations with Parties, we intend to suggest at the opening of ADP 2.10 ways and means to address these issues adequately during the session. At the forthcoming session in Bonn, Parties will need to engage with each other on the substance of all provisions. They will also need to consider how to adjust and go beyond the initial suggested allocation.
 
You will see for example, the paragraph under the ‘Guiding Principles’ section has been separated out into elements in this non-paper (still under the same section), in part three:
 
[All Parties shall ensure: 
a. Respect for and the protection, promotion and fulfillment of human rights for all; 
b. Gender equality and the full and equal participation of women in all climate actions and decision-making processes; 
c. A just transition of the workforce that creates decent work and quality jobs; 
d. The integrity of Mother Earth; 
e. The right to development; 
f. The rights of indigenous peoples.
 
It would indicate the purpose of this tool is to allow for Parties to review these provisions to determine if they might belong in certain sections or can be accommodated elsewhere. This is critical in relation to key language on engagement, preparing society, pubic participation, and acting as one global community taking responsibility instead of opposing divisive categories  throughout the text.
 
The UN SD Education Caucus – Climate Change team will be working on some form of a compilation / analysis document to see which section language has been moved to, understanding this is a non-paper and that the GNT is still the negotiating text. 
 
 
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change

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Encyclical – Full Text

Dear Community of Educators,

There are many responses to the encyclical letter regarding climate change, protection of the planets ecosystems, equality, moral and ethical responsibility.  Here is the UN Secretary General’s statements:

http://www.un.org/sg/statements/index.asp?nid=8732

 

The encyclical letter of the Holy Father Francis – “Laudato Si’: On Care for Our Common Home,” Catholic Herald, June 18, 2015

http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/news/2015/06/18/full-text-laudato-si/

All the best,
Pam Puntenney, Bremley Lyngdoh, and Barbara Benish
Co-Coordinators Climate Change
  Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
 Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA
Cell: +1-(734) 352•7429
Landline: +1-(734) 994•3612

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LCS-RNet Joint Sessions at “Our Common Future Under Climate Change “ in Paris, 9th July

LCS-RNet organizes the joint session entitled, “Transformative Solutions Across Scales: Social Learning, Science, Policy and Dialogues” at “Our Common Future Under Climate Change” being held in Paris, France, which is hosted by French Government, UNESCO and other organizations.
This joint session is scheduled as follows.

LCS-RNet joint session : “Transformative Solutions Across Scales: Social Learning, Science, Policy and Dialogues”

Date : 9th July 17:30 – 19:00
Venue : UPMC Jussieu – Room 105 – Block 24/34

Programme:

Welcome and Introductions (17:30 – 17:34)

Part I: Social learning panel – chaired by Penny Urquhart (17:34 – 17:55 )

- Keynote speech: Learning for a change! The role and challenges of social learning for climate change adaptation
Speaker , Coleen Vogel

- Systemic and social learning approaches for climate change adaptation: Experiences from transboundary work in Southern Africa
Speaker , Sharon Pollard

- Doing much more with the same: Institutional change and social learning for sustainable development outcomes
Speaker, Blane Harvey

Part II: Broad applications panel – chaired by Shuzo Nishioka ( 17:55 – 18:29 )

- Keynote speech: Implementing the long term transition towards Low Carbon Societies
Speaker , Stefan Lechtenböhmer

- Keynote speech: Realizing low‐carbon Asia based on science‐policy interaction through Low Carbon Asia Research Network (LoCARNet)
Speaker , Mikiko Kainuma

- Science‐policy‐stakeholder dialogues about Low Carbon Society: Lessons from the Brazilian Case
Speaker , Emilio Lèbre La Rovere

- China’s Emission Pathway towards global 2 degree target: Policies and Scientific Support
Speaker , Kejun Jiang

- A Transformative knowledge network of global youth for combating climate change: an intercultural perspective
Speaker , Hugo Dayan

Discussion from the floor and Concluding Remarks (18:29 – 19:00)

Please also refer the attached detailed programme.

More information of “Our Common Future Under Climate Change”.
http://www.commonfuture-paris2015.org/
http://cfcc.event.y-congress.com/ScientificProcess/Schedule/index.html?setLng=en#

Thank you in advance for your kind attention.
Best Wishes.
LCS-RNet / LoCARNet secretariat.

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CDC Climat Research and ADEME French Agency of Environment and Energy Management | ClimasCOPe # 3 : GHG emissions accounting

Climas CQPe

6 issues in 2015

1#
Carbon pricing 
March 2015
2 #
Financing the low-carbon transition
May 2015

3 #

GHG emissionsaccounting
June 2015

4 #

The role of sub-national actors
July 2015

5 #

Adaptation to climate change
September 2015

6 #

The compatibility of States ‘commitments with the scenario of 2°C
November 2015

Contributed to this issue:Marion Afriat, Emilie Alberola, Valentin Bellassen, Mariana Deheza, Claudine Foucherot, Julia Grimault, Hadrien Hainaut, Matthieu Jalard, Igor Shishlov et Manasvini Vaidyula

CDC Climat Research benefits from the support of the French Public Long Term investor, Caisse des Dépôts Group, to provide independent expertise when assessing economic issues relating to climate & energy policies in France and throughout the world. CDC Climat Research aims helping public and private decision-makers to improve the way in which they understand, anticipate, and encourage the use of economic and financial resources aimed at promoting the transition to a low-carbon economy. The herein opinion and analysis do not bind ADEME.

Publication manager: Benoît Leguet

Editor in chief: Marion Afriat/) 01.58.50.96.04/* marion.afriat@cdcclimat.com

CDC Climat Research 
47, rue de la Victoire – 75009 Paris – France
Follow us on Twitter  @CDCCLIMAT

www.cdcclimat.com

 

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Heading towards the 2015 Paris international Climate Conference (COP21), CDC Climate Research, in partnership with ADEME, the French Environment and Energy Management Agency, launches ClimasCOPe, a publication aiming to shed some light on the challenges of these international climate negotiations.

ClimasCOPe will provide, in a four-pages publication, a synthesis of each challenge, the last steps of climate negotiations and a focus on the key initiatives in this area.

ClimasCOPe # 3 – GHG emissions’accounting (MRV)

§  Editorial - Three keys to effective GHG emissions monitoring for a broader climate agreement, by V. Bellassen, INRA Research Institute
§  Challenge - MRV: how to hit the bull’s eye when there is no silver bullet?,
by I. Shishlov
§  Key indicator - Overview of international reporting requirements for UNFCCC countries and emissions of the 15 highest emitters, by M. Afriat and M. Vaidyula

§  Climate international negotiations developments by M. Vaidyula

§  3 initiatives of MRV by C. Foucherot, J. Grimault and M. Vaidyula

Read the issue # 3 >>

Find all issues of ClimasCOPe (FR-ENG-ESP) >>

UNFCCC reportMap LOGO.

Source : CDC Climat Research, 2015
Contributed to this issue:Marion Afriat, Emilie Alberola, Valentin Bellassen, Mariana Deheza, Claudine Foucherot, Julia Grimault, Hadrien Hainaut, Matthieu Jalard, Igor Shishlov et Manasvini VaidyulaCDC Climat Research benefits from the support of the French Public Long Term investor, Caisse des Dépôts Group, to provide independent expertise when assessing economic issues relating to climate & energy policies in France and throughout the world. CDC Climat Research aims helping public and private decision-makers to improve the way in which they understand, anticipate, and encourage the use of economic and financial resources aimed at promoting the transition to a low-carbon economy. The herein opinion and analysis do not bind ADEME.

Publication manager: Benoît Leguet
Editor in chief: Marion Afriat/) 01.58.50.96.04/* marion.afriat@cdcclimat.com
CDC Climat Research 
47, rue de la Victoire – 75009 Paris – France
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Pristine Rainforest CI

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Dear Friends and Colleagues,

Forward note from Bremley Lyngdoh:
Have you ever seen a pristine rainforest? CI’s Russ Mittermeier—a.k.a. the “Indiana Jones of conservation”—gives us a peek at one of our world’s last ones …ci-intl.org/ProtectTheForests #NatureIsSpeaking#CreateChange
Unbroken Rainforest!
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
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Trade Unions — ITUC online: World’s citizens ahead of leaders on climate change

INTERNATIONAL TRADE UNION CONFEDERATION
ITUC OnLine
World’s citizens ahead of leaders on climate change
ESPANOL: Los ciudadanos aventajan a sus líderes en cuanto al cambio climático
http://www.ituc-csi.org/los-ciudadanos-aventajan-a-sus
FRANCAIS: Les citoyens du monde devancent les dirigeants en matière de changement climatique
http://www.ituc-csi.org/les-citoyens-du-monde-devancent?lang=fr

Brussels, 8 June 2015 (ITUC OnLine): Governments around the world are lagging behind urgent demands to address climate change, with people voicing overwhelming support – particularly in developing countries – for immediate action, the latest ITUC poll revealed.

Nine out of ten people across the globe are demanding their elected leaders do more to prevent the world’s population from being impacted by the effects of man-made global warming, the latest International Trade Union Confederation Frontlines Poll showed.

“As the deadly heatwave in India and the crippling drought in California both show, rich and poor nations alike are affected by climate change,” ITUC general secretary Sharan Burrow said. “But with developing countries experiencing more and being less able to respond to climate-related catastrophes, we’re hearing the most urgent calls for government action from the Global South.”

The ITUC poll asked people from nine countries, representing half the world’s GDP, from both the developed and developing world, if and when they thought world leaders needed to act to prevent the world’s population from being impacted by climate change.

Key findings include:

•       90 per cent want to see leaders take action to protect the international community from climate change impacts;
•       Almost 70 per cent want action from leaders now, without delay;
•       Almost 8 out of 10 people want action in the next 12 months or less;
•       While almost two-thirds of the developed world want action, the figure is far higher in the developing world at 80 per cent;
•       Even in the UK (58 per cent) and the US (55 per cent), the majority are demanding action.

The two countries with the loudest calls for immediate action were the heavily populated island nations of Indonesia (90 per cent) and the Philippines (88 per cent).

“Wealthier countries like the United States emit more emissions per capita than developing countries, but the demand for government action is most urgent from nations like the Philippines which know firsthand the more prevalent extreme weather events the International Panel on Climate Change predicts,” Ms Burrow said.

The Philippines had so many typhoons in 2013 that it ran out of letters to name them, including the devastating ‘Haiyan’, which left 6300 dead and 2000 still missing.

“This could be the future for other nations experiencing a rapidly changing climate.”

The ITUC Frontlines Poll also revealed that governments could no longer use their constituents as a reason for inaction, with just four per cent indicating world leaders did not need to act.

Almost two-thirds of those aged 55 years and older wanted immediate action, and just one in 10 of this age group believed inaction from world leaders should continue.

Ms Burrow said: “Politicians who are not prepared to commit to decarbonise our world and save us from the horrors of climate change don’t deserve to be elected.

“This survey proves any pressure for world leaders to continue to sit on their hands is coming from the corporate world and not their people.

“The international community, particularly those most vulnerable, are demanding their governments ignore lobbying from big business and show real leadership on climate change. What is missing are national plans for industrial transformation and just transition.”

ENDS

Read the full ITUC Frontlines Poll here http://www.ituc-csi.org/ituc-frontlines-poll-special-topic-16271
For more information contact gemma.swart@ituc-csi.org +44 7944 99 07 63

The ITUC represents 176 million workers in 162 countries and territories and has 328 national affiliates.

Follow us on the web: http://www.ituc-csi.org

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Video Clip 3rd Dialogue on Article 6 of the Convention, UNFCCC

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Dear Colleagues,The 3rd Dialogue on Article 6 of the UNFCCC was held on 2nd and 3rd June.A short video interview taken at the time may be of interest to the UN SD Education Caucus – Climate Change network.
The link is:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMQFyquvW6c

Regards,
Kartikeya

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Invitation – Climate change and Health Workshops: Arctic and Small Island Developing States
Climate Change and Health: Call for Papers
Two Workshops at University College London
Two workshops are being held at University College London, U.K. on climate change and health:
1. Arctic, 20-21 October 2015, leading to a book.
2. Small Island Developing States, 24-25 May 2016, leading to 1-2 journal issues and together with a panel proposal for “Anthropology, Weather and Climate Change” 27-29 Mayhttps://www.therai.org.uk/conferences/anthropology-weather-and-climate-change-2016
Please submit a maximum 300-word abstract (plus listing up to five citations) for either workshop (or both) by 1 July to Ilan Kelman ilan_kelman@hotmail.com
For each workshop:
(a) Up to 20 proposals will be selected. The workshop format will be that draft papers are briefly presented and then critiqued through detailed discussion in order to give feedback for the book and journal issues.
(b) Food will be provided for each workshop, but apologies that neither travel nor accommodation could be covered.
(c) Up to 3 attendees will be asked to present on a panel for a public event one evening.
(d) A limited number of others may attend the workshop and participate in questions/discussion.
The workshops are run by the UCL Global Governance Institute, the UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction, the UCL Institute for Global Health, and Many Strong Voices http://www.manystrongvoices.org
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Climate March
Global Development Professionals Network: Powerfully Communicate Climate Change Solutions
Dear Friends and Colleagues,
Esther Agbarakwe, founder, Nigerian Youth Climate Coalition and #ClimateWednesday, Abuja, Nigeria, @estherclimate Appeal to communal values: Simply “selling” people solutions – saying that the only reason to tackle climate change is to make yourself richer or cooler – is ultimately self destructive.Should campaigners be publishing in more local languages, or pushing for climate change to be taught at school? Our panel share their suggestions for the best ways to promote positive action, to learn more:

 
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 Last year, thousands of people took to the streets as part of the People’s Climate March. Photograph: Craig Ruttle/AP

 

A related article, sponsored by Connect4Climate, also discusses how to promote positive action on climate change in the lead-up to COP21 in Paris.  FYI… The panel who orchestrated the global Q & A are listed with their contact information on this web link. Our partner for COP20 and COP21, John D. Liu international filmmaker, founder and director of Environmental Education Media Project (EEMP), film on the Loess Plateau  is mentioned as one of those effective positive communication examples, visit:
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All the best,
Dr.s Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs

Co-Coordinators Climate Change with Tiahoga Ruge, Jim Taylor, Tich Pesanayi, Kavita Myles, Barbara Benish, and Suzana Padua
Youth:  Katherine Browne and Fumi Kikuyama
 


Dr. P. J. Puntenney
Environmental & Human Systems Management
1989 West Liberty
Ann Arbor, MI  48103  USA

E-mail:  pjpunt@umich.edu
Cell: +1-(734) 352•7429
Landline: +1-(734) 994•3612

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London: Foreign Minister of Marshall Islands @ Imperial College (5pm, 14 May)
The Honourable Tony de Brum, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of the Marshall Islands
Imperial College, Grantham Institute Boardroom, London SW7 2AZ
5pm, Thursday 14 May 2015
As the chief diplomat of one of the world’s lowest lying atoll nations, Minister de Brum will discuss the existential threat and security implications of climate change and progress in negotiations towards a new global agreement on climate change, scheduled to be adopted at the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris later this year.
In February 2013, Minister de Brum addressed a landmark UN Security Council meeting on the security implications of climate change and later that year coordinated the Marshall Islands’ hosting of the Pacific Islands Forum Leaders’ meeting, which produced the groundbreaking Majuro Declaration for Climate Leadership. Building on RMI’s powerful example of converting 95 per cent of its outer island communities to solar electricity, Minister de Brum has also become the world’s leading voice for the transformational potential of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology, spearheading a proposal to power his home constituency at Kwajalein Atoll which hosts a US military presence.
Born in 1945, Minister de Brum grew up on the island of Likiep during the 12-year period from 1946 to 1958 when the United States conducted 67 atomic and thermonuclear weapons in the Marshall Islands. As a nine-year-old, Minister de Brum witnessed the ‘Bravo shot’ at Bikini Atoll, the largest-ever US nuclear test that produced an explosion 1,000 times more powerful than Hiroshima. Throughout his life, Minister de Brum has also been a tireless advocate for nuclear disarmament, and is leading the Marshall Islands’ current international court action against the world’s nuclear powers for their failure to meet their obligations under the Non-Proliferation Treaty.
 
The event can be followed on Twitter (@MinisterTdB) and a transcript will also be posted there following the event.
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Questions That Should Be Asked Of Politicians And Others Who Oppose National Action On Climate Change On The Basis Of Scientific Uncertainty Or Unacceptable Cost To The Economy Given That Climate Change Is A Profound Global Justice And Ethical Problem

Donald A. Brown
Scholar In Residence and Professor

Sustainability Ethics and Law
Widener University School of Law, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Dear Professor Brown

Well presented 11/10! Of course you are correct, however, Politicians’ come and go, sadly, often in a portfolio far from their expertise or any formal publications, especially in the area Earth Science.

Let me propose a slight shift in approach that all political bodies will embrace. Tried, tested, proven fact to become the baseline of their presentations and platform.

Simple outline

Reversing climate change is the greatest business, job creating economy boost of all times! In the USA particularly “do a Roosevelt” a lateral thinker and a Richard Branson quote)!

GHG when Europeans became seafarers they took all were ever they sailed, and later, with chainsaw and plough they finished it, land stripping back to deserts. USA being no exception!

California a great start! Apply the following (we apply in PRC Australia and shortly AU.  With the correct selection of vegetation well before 2020-5 USA can reverse deserts employ many and funded by UNFCCC CO2 offset trading to cover all costs. By 2020 self sufficient in food, fodder and as soil expands say year 4-5 start forestry planting! If I were down the road I would bring models soil growing from sand (silica).

Charles Dickens 1846 “Pictures from Italy” and other noted authors refer to the bird dropped seed high on the wall grows and the root system manure becomes soil.

A political, apolitical solution

Grow soil, soil-carbon, food, fodder in deserts, drought impacted land, reverse anthropogenic CO2e, desertification, poverty and in time  damaging climatic events.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbI8YZmBP8g&feature=youtu.be  (Abridged protocol applied PRC reverse deserts poverty CO2)

http://robertvincin2020.wix.com/soil  (how soil atmosphere grew and can again)

USA could well table at Paris 2015 “we have commenced a plan meeting 2020”

Best wishes without prejudice

Robert Vincin

Chairman Emission Trading Association Australia Ltd

Est. 1998,  61 499 651 096

PO Box 804 Drummoyne 1417 NSW Australia

This message, and any attachments to it, contains information that is confidential and may also be the subject of legal professional or other privilege. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, you must not review, copy, disseminate or disclose its contents to any other party or take action in reliance of any material contained within it. If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender immediately by return email informing them of the mistake and delete all copies of the message from your computer system. Thank You!

 bounce-1469426-472339@lists.iisd.ca [mailto:bounce-1469426-472339@lists.iisd.caOn Behalf Of Donald Brown
Sent: Sunday, 19 April 2015 6:00 AM
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List
Subject: Questions That Should Be Asked Of Politicians And Others Who Oppose National Action On Climate Change On The Basis Of Scientific Uncertainty Or Unacceptable Cost To The Economy Given That Climate Change Is A Profound Global Justice And Ethical Problem

 

National debates about climate change policies around the world are mostly ignoring the practical significance for policy if climate change must be understood and responded to  as an ethical and moral problem.

If  climate change is fundamentally is a problem of justice and ethics, politicians should be asked specific questions that force them to deal with ethical issues that they are ignoring when  they justify their position that a nation need not adopt climate policies that will reduce  a nation’s ghg emissions to its fair share of safe global emissions because of costs to the nation or scientific uncertainty. See ethicsandclimate.org  for the list.

This list can also be found at  specific questions

These questions are important to ask for several reasons including the need to help civil society understand the ethical problems with common responses to climate change.
Donald A. Brown

Scholar In Residence and Professor

Sustainability Ethics and Law
Widener University School of Law, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

http://ssrn.com/author=1331896 (papers published on SSRN )

717-802-1009 (cell)

If you are not vincin@emissiontraders.com.au and would like to join the CLIMATE-L Mailing List, please click here to SUBSCRIBE

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Climate Opinion Now Mapped in Unprecedented Geographic Detail

View it in your browser.

 

Burnes, Roberta (EEC) <Roberta.Burnes@ky.gov> Date: Tue, Apr 7, 2015

Subject: [CLEAN Network] FW: Climate Opinion Now Mapped in Unprecedented Geographic Detail To: CLN list <climateliteracynetwork@list.terc.edu>

For those of you who aren’t on Leiserowitz’s mailing list, a fascinating new mapping tool!

Roberta M. Burnes

Environmental Education Specialist

Kentucky Division for Air Quality

200 Fair Oaks Lane, 1st Floor

Frankfort, KY 40601-1403

502-564-3999 ext. 4403

 

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Subject: climate-l digest: March 17, 2015
From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca>
Date: Wed, 18 Mar 2015 Having trouble viewing this digest email?
Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L
Digest for Tuesday, March 17, 2015.
1. new AfDB climate finance newsletter 2. weADAPT: Community digital storytelling, urban flooding, high-end scenarios and more…..
3. MIT Climate CoLab: seeking high impact ideas to tackle climate change
4. 8 Key Elements for Success on Climate Change Mitigation at COP21 in Paris
5. “Weather reports from 2050″ — new series now available
6. Climate Science & Policy: news, stories and updates
7. Galvanizing the Groundswell of Climate Actions Newsletter – 16-March-15
8. APPLY NOW: eCourse, ‘Emissions Trading Systems: Using Markets to Promote Low Emissions Development’
9. Bridges Trade BioRes, Vol. 9, No. 2 | The future of fish trade 10. NAP Expo 2015: Realizing the National Adaptation Plan (NAP) process
11. Invitation to participate – climate change and land-use survey
12. Geoengineering Debate at Ourenergypolicy.org
13. CDC Climat Research  ||  Publications and news ||  January – February 2015
14. Climate Change Daily Feed – 18 March 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice
15. Climate Change Job Vacancies Update – 18 March 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice
Tue, 17 Mar 2015 Subject: new AfDB climate finance newsletter
Dear all, Don’t miss the new issue of the climate finance in Africa newsletter on bit.ly/CFN29AfDB.
All you want to know about climate finance on the continent is in it. And if you have any questions or if you want to subscribe, please write to climatefinance@afdb.org Enjoy the reading !
PS : the newsletter exists also in French, just ask us From: Sukaina Bharwani <sukaina.bharwani@sei-international.org>
Date: Tue, 17 Mar 2015 Subject: weADAPT: Community digital storytelling, urban flooding, high-end scenarios and more…..
Dr. Sukaina Bharwani | Senior Research Fellow | Stockholm Environment Institute

29 Grove Street, OXFORD, OX2 7JT, UK

T: +44 1865 355605 | Skype: sukaina_b | Twitter: @weADAPT1

QuickShare your climate adaptation projects with the weADAPT CommunityCheck out the latest content in weADAPT’s Newsletter
  Laur Fisher lfi@mit.edu  Date: Tue, 17 Mar 2015
Subject: MIT Climate CoLab: seeking high impact ideas to tackle climate change
MIT Climate CoLab: seeking high impact ideas to tackle climate change
The Climate CoLab recently announced twenty-two contests, each seeking high-impact actions that will make a significant difference in addressing climate change.
Run by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Center for Collective Intelligence, the Climate CoLab is a completely open, online platform where experts and the public work together to develop high impact ideas and plans for what we can do about climate change, right now.  Authors of most promising proposals are invited to present before government officials, business executives, NGO leaders and scientists at an MIT event this fall, where a $10,000 Grand Prize will be awarded!
Share the 20+ contests on the site now, submit a proposal, or help others develop their work by offering your expertise .  Current contests address low-carbon energy, building efficiency, adaptation, shifting public attitudes and behaviors, and over a dozen other topics.  Entry deadline: Saturday, May 16, 11:59:59 PM Eastern Time.
Visit the Climate CoLab at www.climatecolab.org.  Social media short link:  http://mitsha.re/1ATBW0P
The Climate CoLab is a project of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Center for Collective Intelligence.

UNSDSN Info <info@unsdsn.org  Tue, 17 Mar 2015

Subject: 8 Key Elements for Success on Climate Change Mitigation at COP21 in Paris
Dear colleagues,
In December the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP-21) of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change will convene in Paris to adopt a global agreement on climate change. In preparation, the Leadership Council of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) has prepared a brief paper outlining key recommendations for how this agreement can become consistent with keeping the rise in global temperatures to less than 2°C – the internationally agreed target on climate change.
We hope you find this paper of interest. As always we welcome your comments. You can reach us atinfo@unsdsn.org.
With best regards,
SDSN Secretariat

Michael Williams <mwilliams@wmo.int> Wed, 18 Mar 2015

Subject: ”Weather reports from 2050″ — new series now available

The third series of WMO’s “weather reports” from a climate-change world has been launched to support the World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction, which ends today in Sendai, Japan.  Most of the videos are available in English, French and Spanish. The list of new Series 3 videos is below.  Please visitwww.wmo.int/media/content/weather-reports-future-0
 ​
Seychelles in English, French and Spanish
Ghana in English and French Cuba in Spanish, French, English  Chile in Spanish, English and French Nigeria in English and French  Italy in Italian, English, French, Russian and Spanish Madagascar in French and English
Michael Williams

Chief, Communications and Public Affairs
World Meteorological Organization (WMO)
CP 2300, CH-1211 Geneva 2, Switzerland
Follow us on TwitterFacebook and www.wmo.int

Michael Williams

Chief, Communications and Public Affairs
World Meteorological Organization (WMO)
CP 2300, CH-1211 Geneva 2, Switzerland
Follow us on TwitterFacebook and www.wmo.int

The information contained in this electronic message and any attachments are intended for  specific individuals or entities, and may be confidential, proprietary  or privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the  sender immediately, delete this message and do not disclose,  distribute or copy it to any third party or otherwise use this message. The  content of this message does not necessarily reflect the official  position of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) unless  specifically stated. Electronic messages are not secure or error free  and may contain viruses or may be delayed, and the sender is not liable  for any of these occurrences.


SAVE PAPER – Please do not print this e-mail unless absolutely necessary From: Ufficio Stampa – CMCC <ufficiostampa@cmcc.it>  Date: Wed, 18 Mar 2015

Subject: Climate Science & Policy: news, stories and updates
Dear Colleague,
the Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change is glad to inform you on updates of news and stories around Climate Science&Policy (Apologies for cross-mailing)
All stories and articles are available at this web page: http://www.cmcc.it/newsletters/cmcc-newsletter-032015
PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Put aside any prophecy of doom and let’s talk about something that could be used as a resilience-enhancing strategy.
Koko Warner, United Nations University, on migration in the face of climate changehttp://www.cmcc.it/article/people-on-the-move-migration-in-the-face-of-climate-change CLIMATE CHANGE AND MIGRATIONS Fostering a better understanding of climate-related migration will be a fundamental step in securing the future stability of our planet and action on poverty reduction.
From Carlo Carraro’s Blog http://www.cmcc.it/article/climate-change-and-migrations RICCARDO VALENTINI AWARDED WITH THE ERNST HAECKEL PRIZE
Named after the scientist who introduced in the scientific literature the term “ecology”, the award honors a senior ecologist for outstanding contributions to European ecological science http://www.cmcc.it/article/riccardo-valentini-awarded-with-the-ernst-haeckel-prize SETTING THE NEW PATH FOR THE IPCC It plays an influential role in the in the climate change policy process.
But its operations are becoming unfit for purpose. Reasons and improvements to overcome the obstacles.
From Carlo Carraro’s Blog http://www.cmcc.it/article/setting-the-new-path-for-the-ipcc LIDAR DATA FOR BIOMASS ESTIMATION OF AN
AFRICAN TROPICAL FOREST A new method of quantifying errors of remotely sensed above ground biomass and carbon stock for understanding the global carbon cycle and implementing the United Nations Program on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (UN-REDD). A study on Remote Sensing of Environment http://www.cmcc.it/article/lidar-data-for-biomass-estimation-of-an-african-tropical-forestENERGY EFFICIENCY: THE EFFECTS OF INCENTIVES The effects of the policy on two types of renovations: door/window and heating system replacements. A new study on Energy Efficiency http://www.cmcc.it/article/energy-efficiency-the-effects-of-incentives HEAVY PRECIPITATION EVENTS OVER THE EURO-MEDITERRANEAN REGION IN A WARMER CLIMATE A picture of a Euro-Mediterranean region with intensifying heavy precipitation events over the majority of land, especially during winter, as confirmed by CMIP5 model projections for the end of the twenty-first century.
ORIENTGATE CONNECTED TO THE CLIMATE – ADAPT PLATFORM The project is now on the website of the EU Commission initiative to collect and share information on adaptation to climate change.
Some information about the six case studies developed within the project will be soon availablehttp://www.cmcc.it/article/orientgate-connected-to-the-climate-adapt-platform FRONTIER RESEARCH IN OPERATIONAL OCEANOGRAPHY BETWEEN THE MEDITERRANEAN AND CHINA SEAS Distinguished experts from China tell us about recent development in operational oceanography and how international collaboration with Italy is relevant in order to improve our knowledge of climate scienceshttp://www.cmcc.it/article/frontier-research-in-operational-oceanography-between-the-mediterranean-and-south-east-china-seas
INTEGRATING CLIMATE CHANGE KNOWLEDGE INTO PLANNING: RESULTS AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES Six pilot studies, three thematic Centers, the key project outputs, and the OrientGate Data Platform.
The final newsletter is online, with the editorial by Antonio Navarra, CMCC Presidenthttp://www.cmcc.it/article/orientgate-wrapping-up-project-results-and-future-perspectives INTERNATIONAL JOURNALISM FESTIVAL: “CLIMATE CHANGE: THE CHALLENGE TO JOURNALISM” All the ingredients are there to make climate change a journalism workshop: obstacles, opportunities, risks, limitations, and the prospects of  journalism that has http://www.cmcc.it/events/festiva-internazionale-di-giornalismo-climate-change-the-challenge-to-journalism CLIMATE CINEMA 2015 The event is organized by ICCG in collaboration with International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).
DOWNSCALING CLIMATE MODELLING The First Training Workshop on Downscaling Climate Modelling has been organized in Lecce (Italy), at CMCC Ocean Lab on March 9-20, 2015.
II INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FIRE BEHAVIOUR AND RISK The II International Conference on Fire Behaviour and Risk will be held in Alghero,
CMCC-JAMSTEC SYMPOSIUM ON PREDICTABILITY AND APPLICABILITY OF CLIMATE VARIATIONS AND CHANGE http://www.cmcc.it/events/cmcc-jamstec-symposium-on-predictability-and-applicability-of-climate-variations-and-change
All stories and articles are available at this web page: http://www.cmcc.it/newsletters/cmcc-newsletter-032015 Thomas Hale <thomas.hale@bsg.ox.ac.uk>
 Wed, 18 Mar 2015
Subject: Galvanizing the Groundswell of Climate Actions Newsletter – 16-March-15
WM Climate Action News Letter
 Aim of Newsletter

The aim of this newsletter is to connect the network of individuals and organizations who seek to encourage, support, and catalyze the groundswell of actions and commitments on climate change from sub-national and non-state actors. We hope to encourage communication within the community by highlighting groundswell successes and events, tracking reports and publications, and keeping up-to-date with opportunities for engagement. Introducing Project Manager We would like to introduce Natalie Weigum, the new project manager for Galvanizing the Groundswell of Climate Actions. If you have any point of interest you would like to share with the network, please feel free to get in touch at natalie.weigum@gmail.comUpcoming Events
Understanding and communicating the groundswell of climate actions | New York City, USA | April 16-17, 2015 Catalyzing climate actions for resilient development | Bonn, Germany | June 5, 2015 Galvanizing the Groundswell network event | Bonn, Germany | June 6, 2015
Who we are

Galvanizing the Groundswell of Climate Actions is a series of dialogues convened by the Stanley Foundation, the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University, and the Natural Resources Defense Council. Its objectives include:
  1. Bringing the groundswell of climate actions from cities, regions, companies, and other groups to a higher level of scale and ambition;
  2. Increasing efficient coordination among cooperative initiatives and sub- and non-state networks;
  3. Improving analysis and understanding of “bottom-up” climate actions;
  4. Building a positive narrative of pragmatic, concrete action on climate change; and
  5. Identifying opportunities for the groundswell of climate actions and the multilateral process to support and catalyze each other.
Over the past year, Galvanizing the Groundswell has brought together city and regional networks, company networks, cooperative initiatives, governments, international organizations, and researchers to discuss and advance these objectives. By convening the community of actors that make up and support climate actions at all levels, Galvanizing the Groundswell seeks to realize the full potential of this extraordinary innovation in global governance.
Summary of Recent Events
Workshop: NAZCA Platform Consultation | Geneva, Switzerland | February 6-7, 2015 The creation ofNAZCA Platform (further details in subsequent summary) signaled the solidification of the essential role of non-state and sub-national actors alongside nation-states. This workshop met to discuss and produce a series of recommendations on the development and guiding principles of NAZCA. The recommendations focused on clarifying NAZCA’s communication strategy and audience, along with addressing questions surrounding seven key action areas: defining criteria for the inclusion of International Cooperative Initiatives (ICIs) from the Climate Initiatives Database into NAZCA; determining criteria for highlighting especially noteworthy actions within NAZCA; enabling and showcasing data analysis on NAZCA; expansion of NAZCA; identifying functionalities that could be sought in the next phase of NAZCA Platform; following up on the outcomes of the initiatives and actions listed in NAZCA; and refining the platform’s relationship with the UNFCCC process. Full summary here.   Catalyzing Climate Action at All Levels | Lima, Peru | December 8, 2014 The groundswell of climate actions at every level was celebrated at numerous events in Lima, including a special Lima Climate Action High Level Meeting, at which the UNFCCC Secretariat and Peruvian Government launched the Non-state Actor Zone for Climate Action (NAZCA) platform, an online tool to showcase and aggregate climate action by cities, companies, states and regions, and other actors from around the world. NAZCA imports data from several sources, including the Climate Initiatives Database,ICLEI’s carbonn Climate Registry (cCR)the Climate Disclosure Project, and the Climate Group. As we move toward COP21 in Paris in December 2015, there is an enormous opportunity to bring the groundswell of climate action to a higher level of scope and ambition. The Catalyzing Climate Action at All Levels workshop hosted by Galvanizing the Groundswell discussed how we can maximize the potential of this opportunity. Crosscutting themes from presentations by various initiatives included integration, coordination, scaling, amplifying, and enhancing. In considering objectives for a network of cooperative initiatives, four stood out: raising ambition; providing accountability; building the narrative of momentum for change; and connecting the international climate change regime with action happening on the ground. Full summary here.
Reports and Publications of Interest

Galvanizing a Groundswell of Solutions to Support COP21. By Galvanizing the Groundswell of Climate Actions Is there room for new players in the international climate regime? By Amy Weinfurter, Yale Center for Environmental Law and PolicyNEGOTIATIONS: City and state actions deserve recognition in global climate deal, leaders say. By Lisa Friedman, E&E reporterKey Elements for Success on Climate Change Mitigation at COP21 in Paris. By Sustainable Development Solutions Network

Please feel free to get in touch at:natalie.weigum@gmail.com
Galvanizing the Groundswell of Climate Actions · Turl Street · Oxford, Oxfordshire OX13DR · United Kingdom
Chandni Dinakaran cdinakaran@worldbank.org : Wed, 18 Mar 2015 
 Subject: APPLY NOW: eCourse, ‘Emissions Trading Systems: Using Markets to Promote Low Emissions Development’

 

Dear Climate –L Readers,

E-Learning Course 

Emissions Trading Systems: Using Markets to Promote Low Emissions Development

Last date to apply – March 31 2015 Course Delivery Dates: April 14 – 29, 2015

Introduction:  As the world seeks to enhance global greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation efforts, countries are exploring innovative approaches to scale-up emissions reductions and foster private sector investment in mitigation technologies. Economic instruments, such as emissions trading schemes and carbon taxes, can help to achieve domestic emission reduction goals and targets in a cost-effective way.

Economic instruments also encourage innovation and investment in clean technologies, and are means for countries to scale-up climate change mitigation efforts. During recent years, there has been increasing interest on Emissions Trading Systems (ETS), with new systems being implemented in California, New Zealand, Australia, Quebec, Kazakhstan and Korea. Concurrently, various developing countries are exploring the use of cap-and-trade and other market-based mechanisms for limiting GHG emissions in select sectors.

The course Emissions Trading Systems: Using Markets to Promote Low Emissions Development provides an overview of the theory and practice of Emissions Trading Systems.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learning objectives:

The overall objective of this course is to inform policy planners and climate change practitioners on the rationale behind emissions trading, how emissions trading schemes work, their key design elements, and the key roles and decisions affecting emissions-trading governance.
This course provides practical knowledge and skills to:

  • Appreciate the rationale for using market-based instruments in the context of GHG mitigation;
  • Understand the key principles and design elements for emissions trading schemes;
  • Discuss critically the important trade-offs inherent in ETS design and governance;
  • Learn from design and implementation experiences of existing emissions trading schemes around the world.

Target Audience: This course is meant for decision-makers, policy leaders and development practitioners engaged on climate policy formulation and implementation, including:

  • Senior- and middle-level planners and development officers, advisors, and generally anyone in a position to influence low emission development planning.
  • Technical experts and stakeholders engaged in country-level work within the Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) and similar technical assistance/capacity building initiatives.

For Queries Contact: Ms. Chandni Dinakaran at cdinakaran@worldbank.org   
Link to Application:
 http://einstitute.worldbank.org/ei/course/emissions-trading-schemes-using-markets-promote-low-emissions-development

 

View this email in a web browser

 

 Kimberley Botwright KBotwright@ictsd.ch  Wed, 18 Mar 2015

Subject: Bridges Trade BioRes, Vol. 9, No. 2 | The future of fish trade 

Dear Climate-L readers,

Please see below for the latest edition of Bridges Trade BioRes, a periodical focused on issues at the nexus of trade and the environment, run by the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD).

This edition includes several articles that might be of particular interest to the trade community. Victoria Chomo and Cassandra De Young of FAO take a look at current research on the impacts of climate change on fisheries and reflect on how this might affect trade patterns. Climate change is expected to make the situation of fisheries governance even more urgent and critical. Potential marine impacts also have the potential to change the competitiveness of exports from the fisheries sector, the distribution of fisheries production, and world trade patterns. More research is needed to help national policymakers understand how to adapt to this changing fisheries landscape.

In addition we also run an article by Mahesh Sugathan of ICTSD looking at how the ongoing Environmental Goods Agreement (EGA) trade talks could help to scale up the use of energy efficiency goods. We’re tracking the EGA closely throughout this year and ICTSD will report regularly on the progress made in these negotiations.

As always we welcome feedback!

Cheers,

Kimberley Botwright 

ICTSD, Editor, Bridges Trade BioRes Tel: +41 (0)22.917.89.47

Tel: +41 (0)7.89.11.18.23

Skype: kimberley.botwright

www.ictsd.org

twitter.com/ICTSD_BioRes

facebook.com/ICTSD_BioRes

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TUAC [Trad Unions Major Group] Three quarters of world’s people want governments to act on climate change – ITUC OnLine

Castellano: Tres cuartas partes de la población mundial quieren que los Gobiernos tomen medidas respecto al cambio climático – Nuevo informe Nuevos Frentes de la CSI sobre Justicia Climática detalla los planes sindicales respecto a un acuerdo sobre el clima en 2015http://www.ituc-csi.org/?lang=es Français: Trois quarts de la population mondiale souhaite que les dirigeants agissent pour contrer le changement climatique – Le dossier Nouveaux Fronts de la CSI sur la justice climatique décrit ce qu’ont prévu les organisations syndicales pour parvenir à un accord climatique en 2015 http://www.ituc-csi.org/?lang=fr

From: ITUC Press [press@ituc-csi.org] Sent: Thursday, March 19, 2015 To: MAISER, ITUC-OnLine

Subject: Three quarters of world’s people want governments to act on climate change – ITUC OnLine INTERNATIONAL TRADE UNION CONFEDERATION ITUC OnLine 015/000015 Three quarters of world’s people want governments to act on climate change New ITUC Climate Justice Frontline’s briefing sets out union plans for a climate deal in 2015 Brussels, 19 March 2015 (ITUC OnLine):  Overwhelming support for government action on climate change puts leaders in the spotlight to agree a climate deal in December 2015 that will give the world a fighting chance to limit temperature rises to 2° C. The world’s people want their governments to deal with the pollution that is causing climate change. According to the ITUC Global Poll of the general public in fourteen countries, 73 per cent of people want governments to do more to limit pollution causing climate change. Brazil, South Africa, Russian, Italy and India topped the leaderboard with 80 per cent or more of respondents insistent on action by their governments. “We know the science is unequivocal. Without urgent and ambitious action, we will face a temperature rise of 4° C or more this century and irreversible changes in our climate. “Economists have spoken. The financial damage caused by global warming will cost the world far more than previously estimated,’’ said Sharan Burrow, General Secretary, ITUC. Workers and their unions have a vital role to play to protect jobs in existing workplaces and industries by demanding industrial transformation, organising new quality jobs in the emerging green economy and fighting for the Just Transition measures that ensure we leave no one behind. In the months leading up to the Paris Climate summit in December, mobilisations in hundreds of countries will call on leaders to commit to a strong global agreement on climate change. “Climate change is putting at risks thousands of jobs. There will be no jobs on a dead planet,” said Ms Burrow. In the United States, hurricane Sandy left 150,000 workers displaced and employment was overall reduced by 11,000 workers in New Jersey alone in 2012. Typhoon Hagupit, which hit the Philippines in December 2014, affected around 800,000 workers, with their source of livelihood damaged or displaced overnight. 2015 is an opportunity for the trade union movement to work on three tracks to secure jobs and our planet: –          A strong global agreement on climate change negotiations in Paris which paves the way for a jobs and investment boom and for preventing climate catastrophe in our communities –          National contributions and commitments by governments from which we can negotiate more ambition –          Climate action in workplaces and industries with workers and unions through dialogue, consultation and collective bargaining “We have a right to a seat at the table as we act to stabilise the world’s climate by moving toward a zero carbon emissions future. “This transformation must be supported by Just Transition measures. We have played our role in UN negotiations and fought and won commitments. Now these commitments must be made real and included in the Paris agreement in December 2015. “This means that carbon dependent communities and workers must not be forced to bear the costs of change. We will fight for adequate funding of this transition, as well as for the poorest and most vulnerable of nations to be able to cope with the impacts of climate change,” said Sharan Burrow. ENDS Read the ITUC Frontlines Briefing, Climate Justice: There are no jobs on a dead planet. http://www.ituc-csi.org/ituc-frontlines-briefing-climate Show your support for climate action by signing the petition for climate justice at http://act.equaltimes.org/unions4climate ITUC Global Poll 2014, Fieldwork by TNS Opinion Question: In your view, should the NATIONALITY government do more, same role as present, or less in the following area: Limit pollution causing climate change Country Do More % Same role as present % Do Less % Brazil 93 7 South Africa 88 7 5 Russia 87 9 4 Italy 85 11 4 India 80 6 14 China 74 5 21 Canada 73 22 5 Japan 73 17 10 Germany 70 22 8 Belgium 68 21 11 France 63 27 10 Australia 62 26 12 US 60 23 17 UK 56 33 11 The survey of 14 countries was conducted between 8th and 19th January 2014 and is based on 14,006 responses. The ITUC represents 176 million workers in 162 countries and territories and has 328 national affiliates. Follow us on the web: http://www.ituc-csi.org<http://www.ituc-csi.org/> and http://www.youtube.com/ITUCCSI For more information, please contact the ITUC Press Department on: +32 2 224 02 04

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. Subject: climate-l digest: February 14, 2015 From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Date: Sun, 15 Feb 2015 Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Saturday, February 14, 2015. 1. Joining Changing Forest Management Practices session of the FAO-run International online conference on Tuesday —– If you are not worldview.mission@gmail.com and would like to join the climate-l Mailing List, please click here to SUBSCRIBE: – join-climate-l@lists.iisd.ca “Animon, Illias (FOE)” Illias.Animon@fao.org  Date: Sun, 15 Feb 2015 20:40:25 Subject: Joining Changing Forest Management Practices session of the FAO-run International online conference on Tuesday

The next session (Changing Forest Management Practices) of the International online conference ‘Economics of Climate Change Mitigation Options in the Forest Sector’ organized by the FAO Forestry Department is on Tuesday, 17 February (1-3 pm, Rome time). Please watch all the recorded presentations here (click link to recording for each speaker). Participants will have opportunities to pose questions to eleven panelists. Due to increased demand, we increased the size of the conference platform and consequently we can provide opportunities to a few more persons. If you would like to join please fill out the formhttp://goo.gl/forms/JT1KRJQfBe.  Please see the conference programme.  See more information athttp://www.fao.org/forestry/cc-mitigation-economics/en/. Please contact FO-CCM-CONF@fao.org and copyillias.animon@fao.org, if you have any questions.

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New WPP Video: A Future of Floods and Droughts as Climate Changes

Many thanks and best regard,
Dr. Noman Fazal Qadir PhD(UK), MSc(UK), BSc, DIC(UK), DQMC(UK), MAS(UK), MPEC email :- (personal ) nfqadir@yahoo.com ; nfqadir@gmail.com cellular + 971 50 6534979 ;  KSA +966 55 8930089
“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world: Indeed it’s the only thing that ever has.”& “We won’t have a society if we destroy the environment.” – Margaret Mead- American anthropologist
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 climate-l digest: February 13, 2015 From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca>
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 2015Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L
Digest for Friday, February 13, 2015.1. International Conference on Energy,
Environment and Climate Change (ICEECC 2015), Mauritius, 8-9 July 2015——————-
If you are not worldview.mission@gmail.com and would like to join the climate-l Mailing List, please click here to
“Prof. Walter Leal” lealfilho@yahoo.com
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 2015   Subject: International Conference on Energy, Environment and Climate Change (ICEECC 2015), Mauritius, 8-9 July 2015
International Conference on Energy, Environment and Climate Change (ICEECC 2015), Mauritius, 8-9 July 2015 The International Conference on Energy, Environment and Climate Change (ICEECC 2015) will be held in Mauritius on 8-9 July 2015.
ICEECC 2015 is a multi-disciplinary, peer-reviewed international conference on sustainable energy and environment. The conference will focus on energy production and management, green energy, environmental engineering, environmental  management, climate change and sustainable development.
ICEECC 2015 will include plenary sessions, keynote speeches, parallel oral presentation sessions and poster sessions on different topics. Contributions are invited on the topics within the conference scope and also on other relevant areas.
All contributions should be of high quality, original and not published elsewhere or submitted for publication. All full-paper-length manuscripts will undergo a blind peer-review process.
The  accepted ones will be published in the book “Linking Energy, Environment and Climate Issues” and as a special issue of the International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=IJCCSM titled: “The Energy, Environment and Climate Nexus”.
Further details and the deadlines can be seen at: http://www.iceecc.org/
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Subject: climate-l digest: February 12, 2015 From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca>
“Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015
Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages:https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Thursday, February 12, 2015.
1. ECO – Feb 13 – ADP 2.8 2. Accelerating Investments in Women through Certification- A White Paper of the W+ Standard 3. Radhika Khosla on ‘We lack a clear view on energy planning’ 4. New discussion forum on REDD+, law, and sustainable forest management
Linh Do <linh@theverb.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015
Subject: ECO – Feb 13 – ADP 2.8
Hi all Please find ECO below, for the final day of the ADP 2.8 negotiations in Geneva. For those who don’t know, ECO has been produced since 1972 as commentary to the environmental negotiations process. Linh —Homework between now and Bonn The Geneva session ends today—step one on the road to Paris. Ten months and just three more negotiating sessions to go!  The world is eagerly awaiting an international agreement that represents a turning point and brings us significantly closer to keeping warming below 1.5°C, ensures protection for the most vulnerable by ramping up adaptation to climate change,  and helps countries cope with loss and damage—the impacts of climate change that go beyond adaptation. ECO looks forward to continuing the collegial atmosphere here in Geneva at the next session in Bonn, building on what we are sure will be frequent formal and informal consultations, within groups and between groups, over the next three months. Of course, Parties, listening to your commitment to transparency, civil society expects to be engaged in these discussions and is ready to provide constructive input. So how can Parties best use the time between now and Bonn?  First and foremost, they must talk to each other, so that they come to Bonn with a clearer understanding of what each others’ proposals mean, where they see options for “editorial streamlining”, and how to maximise ambition in the Paris agreement. Differentiation The elements text is peppered with options for differentiation, in which “developed”countries are required to do one thing and “developing” countries are required to do another. In practice, there are two matters at stake here: (1) should there be multiple groups that have different requirements for target types, finance obligations, and reporting requirements? and (2) how do we determine, numerically, when countries are doing their fair shares in terms of domestic mitigation on the one hand and international means of implementation on the other? On the first question, national fair shares on mitigation and finance should be judged in terms of a basket of equity indicators: adequacy, responsibility, capability, adaptation need, and development need. For the second question, we’d like to hear from the Parties. Should the existing Annexes be kept? Kept but not operationalised? Redefined as dynamic annexes that are based on equity indicators, as in the Ethiopian proposal? Should we introduce more groups, as in the Brazilian proposal? Or should we just give up on having any overarching grouping system, and accept that we’re in a purely self-differentiated world (which seems to be the default path that we are on)? It’s clear to ECO that a constructive discussion is needed on these issues at the Bonn session in June. Adaptation and loss and damage There are plenty of good proposals in the text on guiding principles, the global adaptation goal, the link between mitigation, adaptation and loss and damage, national contributions and their communications, and institutional arrangements on loss and damage. Parties should spend the next few months making sure they understand these proposals better. Perhaps a Google hangout on the proposed institutional arrangements on loss and damage is in order? As regular readers will have noted, ECO has spent some time this week emphasising the importance of both adaptation and loss and damage in the Paris agreement. When the schedule and focus of informal meetings between now and Paris is being decided, the importance of adaptation and loss and damage should be fully reflected. There are several events in the weeks to ahead where Parties can build further consensus on these issues, including the April meeting in Bonn where LDCs and other countries come together to take stock of progress on their National Adaptation Plans, as well as the first meeting of the Warsaw Loss and Damage Mechanism Executive Committee.  When putting forward their INDCs, Parties should outline their adaptation plans and the support required to implement them. Mitigation In order to get us on a pathway compatible with keeping warming below 1.5°C, we need cycles and timeframes that will help to increase ambition over time. ECO recommends a five-year cycle for mitigation linked to a cycle for support, as well as regular, robust reviews, all guided by a clearly defined long-term goal. And as any regular ECO reader will know, increasing ambition after 2020 is not enough to avoid dangerous climate change. We need action now, and we actually have a workstream for that purpose. Parties should communicate to the co-chairs their priorities for the technical examination process; ECO suggests renewable energy, energy efficiency, and fossil fuel subsidies reform. The technical examination process (TEP) needs to consider concrete actions, barriers, and support needs. It is also time to start thinking about how an ambition mechanism that builds on the experiences from Workstream 2 can continue after Paris. Finance On climate finance, ECO is pleased that several helpful suggestions made it into the text, including five-year-cycles for setting, reviewing and updating collective targets for the provision of financial support, a requirement that developed countries and others [in a position] [willing][happy] to do so contribute to achieving these targets, and that they regularly communicate what they are providing. The text also includes a proposed process through which developing countries would be enabled to identify what support they need to enhance action, again, in cycles. Although not on the ADP agenda, many corridor conversations in Geneva circled around pre-2020 finance. Even the most stubborn developed country delegates seem to understand that clarity on the $100-billion-promise is a must-do for success in Paris.  So here’s a friendly warning: the roadmap to $100 billion must not be a cheeky accounting exercise, but must reflect a real scaling-up of public finance on top of levels that were already being provided or mobilised in 2009 when the promise was made.  ECO hopes this issue will be on the menu when finance ministers meet at the spring World Bank/IMF meetings in April, and that positive movement will be evident well before Paris—perhaps even by the June session in Bonn. Long-Term Goal Last, but not least, ECO expects Parties to appropriately respond to the accumulated insights coming from the conclusion of the three year-long Structured Expert Dialogue (SED). Here’s a quick summary: there is evidence for dangerous climate change even with 2°C warming, and we are not even close to on track to stay under that limit. And if you prefer, a tweet: #TimeForClimateAction WAKE UP, PEOPLE! We are heading for a horrible climate catastrophe, and we really, really need to act. Starting in Bonn, countries must work towards language in the Paris agreement that clearly expresses our need to phase out fossil fuel emissions by mid-century, and to build a global economy based on 100% clean, renewable energy resources. The science is clear: to stay below a temperature increase of 1.5°C, we must do no less. So there you have it: five easy pieces. If Parties come to Bonn prepared to engage on these issues, the prospects for the deal we need in Paris are bright indeed. The right stuff When ECO learnt that February’s ADP session would be held in Geneva, home of the Human Rights Council, we started dreaming of how the UNFCCC could use a change of scenery (from Bonn) to agree, respect, protect, promote and fulfil human rights for all, in all climate change related actions. Little did we know that nations of the world would actually come one step closer to fulfilling this dream, and in the very first few hours of the session too! Well done. A significant number of groups and countries; including Mexico, Uganda, Chile, the EU, Bolivia, and Tuvalu, supported the inclusion of strong language of human rights, the rights of indigenous peoples, and gender equality. This was done throughout different sections of the text including Section C which will help ensure that these principles apply to all aspects of the agreement. Even though the engagement levels have been great from a wide array of Parties, the road to Paris is short and winding. As Parties are about to engage in the so-called streamlining exercise, remember that beyond all the legalese, climate change has profound human consequences. The lives and livelihoods of literally billions of people are riding on what comes out of this process. ECO is hopeful that the Geneva legacy will make history, and recalls President Hollande’s words last month that COP21 will be an opportunity for ”all nations of the world to take a new step in favour of human rights through the UN climate conference. It is our duty to succeed.” There are no still new ideas under the sun If you know where to look…  Dear delegates, after an [exhausting][exhilarating] week here in Bonn some of you might be feeling tapped out of new [ideas][text]. But ECO is here to assure you that there are some new-old and new-new ideas still out there to be taken advantage of in finance. The UNEP Adaptation Gap report gave the full rationale for exploring these ideas. It is clear that [new] [innovative] [alternative] sources of finance offer significant potential to raise new, additional and predictable finance for adaptation and loss and damage. In fact, we could raise between USD 26 and 115 billion by 2020 from just 3 of these sources: A Financial Transaction Tax (FTT) in the EU has been given a new lease on life by President Hollande, with his plan to host a meeting of 11 interested Eurozone nations this year. The opportunity is there to commit FTT revenues to the GCF. A clear signal from the Paris agreement that international transport emissions must be addressed by international aviation and maritime bodies ICAO and IMO.  This could unlock new finance, whilst helping diminish a projected BAU emissions growth of up to 270% in this sector by 2050. Despite 87% of auction revenues from the EU ETS going to climate finance, less than 20% of this, from just five countries, has gone to international climate finance,. This offers an opportunity to change the rules so that all allowances are auctioned, increasing total funds and committing participating countries to providing revenue to international finance. The idea of a Fossil Fuel Extraction Levy, to be paid into the Loss and Damage Mechanism, offers the opportunity to raise substantial new and predictable finance from the fossil fuel industry, rather than treasury coffers, to pay for loss and damage. Finally, there is the matter of the millions that could be freed from the largely dormant funds in the UNFCCC’s Sustainable Development Mechanism unit, as well as the CDM scale-up fund, and redirected either to the Adaptation Fund or towards capacity building. Thanks to a group of forward-thinking Parties, we have the option to explore these new sources of finance in the text. We need Paris to agree to kick this effort off immediately in 2016, with a view to identifying and mobilising these alternative sources of finance by 2020, or 2025 for the sources that will take longer to come to fruition. All aboard: don’t leave out airplanes and ships Climate negotiators spend much more of their lives on airplanes than they would no doubt wish for. Perhaps there is some kind of psychological repression that makes them want to forget about airplanes as soon as they arrive at the negotiations. But we can’t meet our climate objectives if we don’t include the large and fast-growing emissions from aircraft and ships travelling between countries, which are not included in national targets. The negotiating text took an important step forward this week with the inclusion of text calling for setting emission targets for shipping and aviation, in the context of a 2 degrees C objective. The coming months are an opportunity for a dialogue between Parties on why this step is so crucial to an ambitious deal, and addressing any concerns raised. The importance of this step is clear. Shipping and aviation account for about 6% of global emissions. Indirect impacts of these sectors, like cirrus cloud formation and black carbon, likely add several percent to these impacts. The IMO and ICAO have stated that BAU emissions will increase by up to 250% for shipping and 270% for aviation by 2050. They would account for one-quarter of all allowable emissions under a 2 degree scenario and one-third under a 1.5 degree scenario. A credible deal cannot exist without a role for IMO and ICAO, and an understanding of the contribution these sectors are prepared to make. A key concern of Parties is to ensure that any measure adopted by IMO or ICAO conforms to their view of an appropriate application of the principles they hold dear. The text proposed doesn’t prejudge this–it merely requires each organisation to identify an emission reduction pathway, and leaves it for Parties to each organisation to require that any measures adopted are done so in a way that is fair and equitable. ECO is convinced that solutions exist for emissions reduction measures that respect and reconcile the principles of the relevant bodies. Workable proposals to address differentiation and incidence have been advanced for both sectors. These include “route-based” differentiation for aviation. and for shipping, a financial mechanism that ensures that revenue from any carbon price or levy is allocated in a manner that differentiates between developed and developing countries, in accordance with their capabilities, responsibilities, and circumstances, particularly for SIDS and LDCs. As discussions continue, the wording may need to be strengthened and improved. However, its intent is clear–all sectors must play their part and all emissions sources must be covered. Join the movement Be heartened, delegates! Soon you’ll be back in that other, outside, world, away from all things ADP, streamlining, contact groups and spotty Plug-N-Play Internet.  This wonderful outside world is also home to a global movement of citizens who have taken climate leadership into their own hands. There’s the 400,000 activists taking to the streets of New York, or millions working on climate solutions every day at a variety of levels – the world is pressing ahead to end the fossil fuel era. Today, Global Divestment Day, will see hundreds of communities in 58 countries sending a clear message to institutions: it’s time to stop funding fossil fuels. As you move ahead towards Paris, ECO hopes Parties will keep an eye on this exciting outside world, and be encouraged by the progress happening all around us. This week has seen you walking in the right direction, but the sooner you pick up the pace, the sooner you’ll catch up to the rest of us. ECO’s Valentine’s Nest Love in the time of climate change Are you in the mood for love? Been eyeing that special someone from across the negotiating hall? Wishing you could have a private bilateral or two? Today’s your lucky day, because ECO has a couple of personals for you. If you’d like to share one, use the hashtag #ECOValentines “Fresh Start”   I’m a fun, major emitting country looking to start something new, eh? My previous relationship was 7 years long, and had too many rules and commitments. If you’re up for a good time, enjoying the moment, and not worrying about the future, then I’m your country for romance. “Big Deal” When it comes to carbon, I’m kind of a big deal. Size matters. And if we’re talking cumulative emissions, it’s really no contest at all. I’m not looking for any sort of binding commitment, but if you’ve got something to offer—call me? Maybe we can make it work. “High Energy”Small in stature and greenie at heart seeks partner equally enamoured by windmills, woollen sweaters and mermaids for long walks on the beach and common efforts to reach 100% renewable energies. While arrival on a white steed is not required, proficiency on an iron horse certainly is Ultimate Paris Legal Quiz   Test your knowledge about the legal form of the Paris agreement. Multilateral choices possible! 1. Does the legal form of the agreement matter? a) Yes, it ensures that all Parties will fulfil their promises. b) Yes, otherwise the carbon market will collapse. c) Yes, as long as it’s possible to achieve it. d) Yes, because it could help countries meet the objective of the climate convention. 2. Many Parties call for a Protocol. What is a “protocol”? a) An unwritten rule on how to behave, like here in Geneva or on the Internet, often referred to as ”etiquette”. b) An instrument tied to and often seen as extending or deepening a treaty (see Montreal Protocol to the Ozone Treaty and other well-known protocols). c) Something to expect in Paris, because we like the enforcement of the Kyoto Protocol. d) Something to expect in Paris, because we like the lack of effective compliance we have now. 3. What would “legally binding” mean for this agreement? a) That it is written in such a way that everyone knows what to do and what to expect. b) That if a polluter that has to pay, it really has to pay. c) That the word “shall” appears more times than “will”, “should”, “can” and “may” in the text. d) It has provisions to ensure compliance, and is, at least in principle, judicially enforceable. 4. Does a Party need to establish domestic climate legislation? a) Of course! An agreement (see 1) requires this. b) Of course! Parties refer to this in an agreement. c) Of course! So civil society can sue the state to make it comply with the obligations. d) No! If a Party signs and ratifies an agreement, it will always comply. Answers 1. D 2. B 3. A + B + C + D 4. C—Kidding: do A first, followed by B INDCs and Parties Parties: as you return home to do your INDC homework, ECO reminds you that sequencing is important. Remember to do so on your commitments on finance, mitigation and adaptation assignments, and to do so with fairness and equity in mind. For the first batch of students with submissions due in March, your tasks are clear: 1. Ensure that the INDC presents enough information so that you can determine the amount of greenhouse gas emissions that will be emitted over the entire commitment period. Ask yourself: “Can I tell how many tonnes my country is going to emit over this period?”. Then add more information until the answer is: “Yes!”. 2. Ensure that the type of the mitigation INDC fits your country’s profile. All developed countries capable should provide an economy wide GHG emissions carbon budget to 2025. Other countries in a position to join them should do so—the more the merrier! 3. Ensure that the INDC provides clear and transparent information on the role of the forest and land sector. A full proof way is to count the tonnes that the atmosphere sees. 4. For countries with high responsibility and capability, the INDC should include a finance contribution. For countries that will require financial support, the INDC should indicate financing needs. 5. Ensure that you provide a description on how your INDC is fair and ambitious. Here’s a simple way to do this is to answer the following questions. 1) In your opinion, what’s left of the carbon budget, and is it compatible with 1.5°C and 2°C and the objective of the convention? 2) How many tonnes of this budget do you do you intend to claim? 3) Why is this your country’s fair share? Before getting too creative, reflect what would happen if other countries applied your criteria. 6. Outline what your country is doing to cope with the ever-increasing impacts of climate change, and if you are a developing country, describe your needs for finance and capacity building to implement adaptation strategies that are up to this challenge.

From: Nisha Onta nishkandu@gmail.com  Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015

Subject: Accelerating Investments in Women through Certification- A White Paper of the W+ Standard
Dear Colleagues,
I would like to share “Accelerating Investments in Women through Certification- A White Paper of the W+ Standard”. This white paper makes the case for a new and innovative option for a certification system that channels measureable and verifiable benefits directly to women and women’s organizations. The W+ Standard (W+) is designed to incentivize investments in women’s empowerment through a system that both measures results and puts money into the hands of women, which in addition to the benefits for women themselves, is likely to have transformative impacts on gender inequality, the economy, poverty, climate change, and food security, among other impacts. The W+ Standard is a set of project design and implementation requirements that provides contributors the opportunity to accelerate progress for women and gender equality. The paper will be of interest to social impact investors, companies with social targets, international development donors and agencies, governments, and the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) community. It will also be of interest to a variety of actors along supply chains, including agriculture producer groups, suppliers, processors, vendors, retailers, non-governmental organizations, and consumers that seek transparency and reliability in their claim for supporting women’s empowerment, through the use of W+ certification and label.
Download the White Paper: http://www.wplus.org/White-paper-wplus-2015/1 #InvestInWomen Please share this with your networks. Sincerely, Jeannette Gurung WOCAN Executive Director
From: CPR Climate Initiative <climate.initiative.cpr@gmail.com> To:  Cc:  Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015
Subject: Radhika Khosla on ‘We lack a clear view on energy planning’
Dear colleague, We are delighted to share with you the latest op-ed by Dr. Radhika Khosla, Fellow, CPR titled ‘We lack a clear view on energy planning‘.
(The full text of the article is pasted below) We look forward to your comments and feedback. Warm Regards Climate Initiative Centre for Policy ResearchWe lack a clear view on energy planning
 The HinduBusiness Line, Op-ed 9 February 2015
Data on the emissions intensity of India’s growth remain unsatisfactory as we enter the next level of climate talks.
The lead-up to the UN climate change summit in December 2015 is peppered with speculation about possible outcomes, globally and for India. In preparation, each country is to submit an ‘intended nationally determined contribution’ or INDC by the middle of the year, ahead of the conference of parties. The attention is on India, given the emphasis in the current US-India relationship about prioritising a response to climate change.
In addition, the recent US-China deal signals the shifting positions of other large players towards making a climate commitment, which also turns the spotlight on India. As India prepares its INDC over the next few months, it is an opportunity to reflect on the country’s longer-term approach to energy and climate planning.
The analysis of energy use is crucial to determining India’s possible development trajectories. Various studies examine scenarios for India’s energy future with climate change considerations. These aim to provide insight into future trends for the economy, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and predictions about the effect of likely policies in the energy sector. The studies serve as essential tools to guide energy and climate policymaking by identifying economy sectors that have maximum development and carbon mitigation potential.
Impact of technology
Macro top-down models, which provide economy-wide results such as GDP values and a trajectory for carbon dioxide emissions, usually incorporate technical progress over time in the economy in two ways: the penetration of technological change through a measure called autonomous energy efficiency improvement (AEEI); and by the increase in output caused by technological efficiency or by the more efficient use of existing inputs, encapsulated by the measure, total factor productivity growth (TFPG).
It is interesting to examine how some of the driving technology assumptions compare with each other in prevailing energy and climate policy studies. For example, the former Planning Commission’s Low Carbon Strategies for Inclusive Growth (LCIG) report uses a total factor productivity growth value of 1 per cent for the agriculture sector and approximately 1.5 per cent for the non-agriculture sector. However, an aligned study by the National Council of Applied Economic Research uses a total factor productivity growth value of 3 per cent across sectors. While differing assumptions can be justifiable in their respective contexts, the process of arriving at them is not always clear.
Not surprisingly, the same two studies also show different results for the impact of climate policy on the economy. We see in the LCIG that the emissions produced for every unit of economic output, or the emissions intensity, is 0.33 (kg of GHG/$GDP) in 2030 in the absence of aggressive climate action (or in the ‘reference case’). On the other hand, the NCAER predicts an emissions intensity of 0.13 (kg of GHG/$GDP) in 2030-31 for its reference scenario, after accounting for the differences in methodologies. Credible numbers.
Apart from divergences within national studies, another set of differences can exist across modelling results for India — between those generated by domestic institutes and those developed internationally. The literature shows that national modelling efforts project higher baseline emission levels than international studies for India in 2030, potentially linked to higher GDP growth rates used by national studies. Further, the assumptions and results of scenarios developed by national knowledge centres are often not taken into account in international studies, placing questions on their salience for policy. Given this divergence in outcomes and assumptions, how can we arrive at credible numbers to inform policymaking? An alternative approach to energy and climate planning can be helpful here. The first ingredient would be the development of a robust analytical base built through a deliberative and open process which is clear in its inputs, sensitivities, and methodologies. The use of only one model on which to base direction can have limitations. It is also important to note that no one perfect model or scenario exists which is not a victim of its own set of assumptions and model-type implications. Instead, the credibility of the results lies in the transparency of the process and in having clear and defensible assumptions.
Implementing actions Second, equally important to a rigorous analytical base, is to complement model outputs with a discussion of actions in different sectors. This requires engaging with questions of implementation and a critical analysis of the capacities and roles of different institutions that would take sectoral policies forward in national planning.
Finally, the studies should operationalise a co-benefits framework as adopted by the National Action Plan on Climate Change, the 12th Five Year Plan, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for “measures that promote development objectives while also yielding co-benefits for addressing climate change effectively”. This framing provides a sound basis for advancing multiple and equally important objectives of India’s energy planning — such as development, energy security, socio-environmental goals (including public health), and carbon considerations.
Careful thinking and approaches along these lines could enable India to transition towards a more developed economy, address its existing energy challenge, and respond to the concerns that result from its vulnerability to climate change.
It could also inform India’s INDC preparation, an occasion which offers the opportunity to rethink the country’s approach to rigorous energy planning. The writer is a fellow at the Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi.
CPR’s Climate Initiative seeks to generate research and analysis on the global climate negotiations, and on the links between the global climate regime and domestic laws, policies and institutions in India. It also seeks to create a platform from which scholars and activists can engage in policy and academic debate on climate change. For further details on our work visit, www.cprindia.org Please note that all the correspondence from CPR’s Climate Initiative will be communicated from this email ID. Please ensure that this email IDclimate.initiative.cpr@gmail.com does not go into your spam folder.

From: ”Kenneth L. Rosenbaum” kenro@syenco.com Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015

Subject: New discussion forum on REDD+, law, and sustainable forest management
Dear Colleagues,
Please join our new discussion forum on law, REDD+, and sustainable forest management.   The Forestry Department and the Development Law Service of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are sponsoring the forum. Participation can be in French, Spanish, or English.
The forum is open to discussions of your work, problems, and news. Topics may touch on analysis of current law, reports of parliamentary activity and reforms, issues of national implementation including benefit sharing, conflicts, and corruption, and project-level concerns.
The forum also has a virtual library of links to useful publications and a page announcing coming events.
Sincerely,
Ken Rosenbaum Volunteer forum moderator

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Subject: climate-l digest: February 11, 2015 From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015

Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Wednesday, February 11, 2015. 1. ECO – Feb 12 – ADP 2.8 2. Grassroots Equity Newsletter Issue 4 3. Climate Change Daily Feed – 12 February 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice 4. ENB Vol. 12 No. 625 – Geneva Climate Change Conference – February 2015 – Issue #6 5. ESEE 2015 Summer School – Call for Applications 6. International Workshop on Climate Change “Youth Action on Climate Change” from 21st – 24th May 2015 at Melaka, Malaysia. 7. Power, actors and information: Special issue on REDD+ policy networks now complete 8. Rivers, drainage and flooding courses with HR Wallingford 9. Message-Id:Content-Type:Date; bh=/Iqn0mgTi/O7P8yRBVw7OCn2SrE/Ktx Laux5+jTVzDI=; b=tzP8VVgE+oSBkW9LEuInm5I1dHIGdAe6Ec6hxnmwsgXKZ6E +lGWXNqjXW+VUDbmwh1EbiolR0u4pDl/Li+CC1A== —————————

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Linh Do linh@theverb.org Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015  Subject: ECO – Feb 12 – ADP 2.8

Hi all Please find ECO below, for day five of the ADP 2.8 negotiations in Geneva. For those who don’t know, ECO has been produced since 1972 as commentary to the environmental negotiations process. Linh In Defence of an objectives section Let’s start with the big questions: Why are we here? Is it the beautiful mountain panorama overlooking a magnificent lake, the long working days or the joy of spending more money, than average, for just about everything? No, ECO doesn’t think so either. We’re here to save civilisation, secure our children’s future, keep global warming below 1.5 C; and to pave the path to get there. The agreement needs to send a signal to the rest of the world that we’re heading in the right direction towards a transition to a carbon-free future. It’s not rocket science that putting the common objectives section at the beginning of the document sends a signal that this is exactly what we will do. Clarity at the start of the document will give structure to the text and establish the overall goal supported by all of the subsequent elements of the agreement. Ergo, ECO will defend Section C until it runs out of ink to voice our never-ending support. It’s Section C that will provide a clear direction knitting together all the pieces, outline the drivers and our shared aspirations. Section C on objectives must: – Set the direction towards a resilient world in which we phase-out fossil fuel emissions and phase-in renewable energies, as soon as possible, and no later than 2050. – Reflect requirements for finance, technology and capacity building for creating that resilient world and outline the MOU for developing countries; to help them peak their emissions before subsequently reducing them, ensure human rights, indigenous rights, gender equality and a just transition to decent work opportunities for all. – Make clear that Parties understand the need for adaptation and preparedness will depend on on how fast emissions may be reduced. We all know climate change is a systemic challenge. An agreement that does not start with a frame to enable a systemic response simply wouldn’t work. We need to get this right from the start. Differentiation is in the air The post-Copenhagen vogue has been all about self-differentiation. Everyone wants to talk about it! This is good news,because if we don’t differentiate contributions and rules and get trapped in pure self-differentiation, we’ll lack the overdue ambition needed to tackle climate change . But we’ll need to become a lot clearer about the differentiation challenge. So what is needed now? Let’s start with top-down elements – e.g. equity based comparative review and ratcheting – integrated in the Paris agreement. To that end, ECO raises the following three questions: 1) How do we differentiate? The old binary distinction between “developed” and “developing” countries is unacceptable to (ahem) developed countries. Meanwhile, developing countries will not accept a new accord without a distinction between groups of countries. So, what to do? Ideas are flying! We have Brazil’s “concentric circles” proposal and South’s Africa’s equity reference framework. There’s also America’s rather tongue-in-cheek suggestion for a formulation in which emissions and economic indicators are used to define dynamic groups called “Annex X” and “Annex Y”. Then there’s Ethiopia with their different formulation of dynamic annexes, based on per capita GHG and GDP indicators. And just about everyone’s future features “cycles.” 2) Which rules should apply to which groups? The rules of participation and responsibility are not expected to be the same for all groups. The MRV rules will differ according to groups, and so will plenty of other things. 3) How do we define equitable shares? A positive cycle of increasing ambition requires an equitable regime. Grouping countries is insufficient because it won’t define national “fair shares” in the common effort to stabilise the climate system. You already know our five equity indicators: adequacy, responsibility, capability, adaptation need and development need. South Africa’s equity reference framework and India’s recent “Section K” suggestion on differentiation are not too different. So, it’s clear that with Valentine’s Day around the corner, it’s not just love in the air—differentiation is in the air too. Now we need agreement on differentiation that’s fair and robust enough for COP21, while opening the door for improvement and strengthening in the years after it. By June we need helpful results. This should pave the way for a common understanding of differentiation in Paris that supports an ever improving review and ratcheting system. Sendai calling: tackling disasters and climate change 2015 will be a trek. One summit followed by another, ending with a steep climb to Paris. The first peak will be reached next month with delegates meeting at the World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR) in Sendai, Japan to finalise a new framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR). ECO has some thoughts about outcomes at Sendai: 1. A strong signal that climate change is already increasing the frequency, intensity and unpredictability of natural disasters. Reducing disaster risks will require emissions to be cut drastically. 2. Ramp up support for disaster risk reduction action. Disaster preparedness is not a solo undertaking. Often a practitioner gap exists between DRR institutions and those doing adaptation on the ground. This results in bad planning and loss of crucial resources. Sendai should bridge that gap and transform DRR into “strategic DRR”. 3. Initiate a framework that tracks countries’ progress in advancing DRR both qualitatively and in metrics. This framework could also provide valuable learning and bring coherence in implementation of adaptation actions. 4. Promote approaches to tackle ‘exceeding national capacities’, which is a gap in the international system. Sometimes countries are overwhelmed by disasters. For many countries, these disasters are a direct result of our changing climate. The DRR needs of affected countries should be matched by reliable support, recognising collective and differentiated responsibilities. 5. Strive to be broadly coherent with the post-2015 sustainable development goals and the finance for sustainable development negotiations. 6. Just as with the climate negotiations, take better account of the needs of the most vulnerable, and integrate them into the entire process from needs assessment to implementation and monitoring. From ECO’s viewpoint, the UNFCCC is still the main place for agreeing obligations and commitments to reduce risks through mitigation and adaptation and to address loss and damage.  And Sendai is an important opportunity to provide mutual reinforcement between the UNFCCC process and other international efforts to address those concerns. A message from outside the UNFCCC Bubble ECO hears a lot of talk about the ‘real’ world—that thing outside of the UNFCCC negotiations, remember? Don’t worry, it still exists.  And to be fair, outside of our bubble, there are others too, like the post-2015 sustainable development goals or development finance ones. All three of these bubbles are in motion this year, and their paths will cross. And we all know what happens when bubbles collide, or worse, burst. And that makes Liechtenstein’s signpost to the sustainable development goals in the preamble of the Geneva text very welcome. With the post-2015 sustainable development process, the Heads of States Summit at the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) later this year in September will set the tone for Paris. So, shouldn’t the development framework for the next 15 years also deliver action on mitigation, adaptation, resilience, etc.? It only makes sense that the millennium declaration illustrates how climate-proof development and sustainable development are interlinked. This kind of support for the UNFCCC would be most welcome, especially in strong statements from world leaders in New York. But, dear Parties, you don’t have to wait until September. You can start as early as next week, because there’s a UNGA session from 17-20 February. This is the opportunity to support the long-term vision of phasing-out fossil fuel emissions and phasing-in renewable energy. And beyond that, there’s the process on finance for (potentially sustainable!) development. It would be great if the conference in Addis Ababa this July brings forward climate-proof development finance, and a bit more clarity on how it relates to climate finance. ECO suggests that climate finance experts peek into this bubble, and work to ensure that both climate and development needs are fairly and adequately met. And no double-counting! The emissions abyss The main focus here in Geneva is on shaping the Paris agreement for the post-2020 period. Nevertheless, it is critical that we do not lose sight of the need to increase our climate actions from now up to 2020 as well. Even if a global climate agreement is reached in Paris this December, most of the proposals and targets for cutting emissions won’t kick in until after 2020. But the coming five years are absolutely vital in the battle against climate change. During these five years global emissions should be peaking and then falling, or at the very least, levelling off. At the moment the pre-2020 period doesn’t seem to have much priority in most countries, despite the fact that emissions must peak within this decade to keep global warming below 2°C.  It is no secret that with current emission trends we are heading for a 3.6 to 4°C scenario; just check the IPCC’s work. We can’t allow emission figures to drift ever upwards—otherwise the long-term goals will become even harder to meet. We know that many countries have already started taking actions on climate change at the national level. But we also know that these have not gone far enough. The arguments that action on climate change will negatively affect growth or poverty eradication are no longer valid. Many things can be, and should be, done right now. From scrapping coal-fired power stations and reducing deforestation, to increasing renewables and improving energy efficiency, there are plenty of ways to limit pre-2020 emissions and close the gigatonne gap.

Skyler Wiet <skyler@recoftc.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015  Subject: Grassroots Equity Newsletter Issue 4

Dear CLIMATE-L readers,
Learn more about how the Grassroots Equity and Enhanced Networks in the Mekong (GREEN Mekong) program is working to improve capacities of policymakers and stakeholders in the Lower Mekong region to promote equity in forest-based climate change mitigation policy and practice. The fourth edition of the Grassroots Equity e-Newsletter features stories on:
 For more details on GREEN Mekong’s capacity building and project preparation initiatives, please email:green.mekong@recoftc.org
Kind regards,Mr. Skyler Wiet Communications Officer Grassroots Equity and Enhanced Networks in the Mekong (GREEN Mekong)

RECOFTC – The Center for People and Forests P.O. Box 1111, Kasetsart Post Office, Bangkok 10903 Thailand Tel: +66 (0)2 940 5700 Ext. 3241   Fax: +66 (0)2 561 4880 Email: skyler@recoftc.org Website: www.recoftc.org/project/green-mekongFacebook: www.facebook.com/RECOFTC Twitter: www.twitter.com/RECOFTC YouTube: www.youtube.com/peopleandforests

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Subject: climate-l digest: February 09, 2015 From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2015

If you are not worldviewmission@gmail.com and would like to join the climate-l Mailing List, please click here to SUBSCRIBE:

join-climate-l@lists.iisd.ca Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages:https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Monday, February 09, 2015. 1. ECO – Feb 10 – ADP 2.8 2. ENB Vol. 12 No. 622 – Geneva Climate Change Conference – February 2015 – Issue #3 3. Climate Change Daily Feed – 10 February 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice 4. ENB Vol. 12 No. 623 – Geneva Climate Change Conference – February 2015 – Issue #4 5. Invitation to participate in IRENA briefing on the REmap 2030 analysis – Wednesday 11, February 13-14hrs 6. Global Change Ecology M.Sc. Program: Applications open for winter term 2015/2016 7. Gold Standard Thinking: Greening supply chains, integrated action in agriculture and the risks of not addressing water 8. How has the oil price drop affected the bioenergy industry? Read the results of the WBA survey. 9. New opportunity for EU support for climate action in Eastern Partnership countries 10. INVITATION: Green Growth and the New Industrial Revolution 11. Fwd: Masters Degree: Marine, Coastal, & Atmospheric Science & Policy (UM/RSMAS) 12. Call for Papers – Special Issue of “Climate Policy” – The 2020 Strategy Experience: Lessons for Regional Cooperation, EU Governance and Investment 13. Decide Strathclyde: LLM in Climate Change Law & Policy – Preview 14. Out now: LCFC Virtual Academy on Sustainable Urbanisation 15. New WPP Video: A Future of Floods and Droughts as Climate Changes

Linh Do <linh@theverb.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2015  Subject: ECO – Feb 10 – ADP 2.8

Hi all
Please find ECO below, for day three of the ADP 2.8 negotiations in Geneva.
For those who don’t know, ECO has been produced since 1972 as commentary to the environmental negotiations process.
Linh
Separating Loss & Damage from Adaptation
ECO was very pleased to hear the excellent interventions from AOSISLDCsAILAC (together with Mexico and the Dominican Republic), LMDCs and Africa Group yesterday, emphasising that Loss and Damage needs to be a separate item within the Paris agreement.
As explained by AOSIS, anchoring the Loss and Damage institutional arrangements in the agreement will ensure their durability and flexibility. This will allow for the adjustment of support to vulnerable countries depending upon their levels of ambition in mitigation and adaptation.
Meanwhile, the LDCs reminded Parties that dealing with losses and damages from slow-onset and extreme events is not a luxury—it is a necessity. The LDCs’ concrete proposals for elements of a Paris agreement, including a compensation regime and a displacement coordination facility, reflect the real circumstances of vulnerable people both now and in the future.
Developed country Parties really should do their remedial reading, and not be afraid to engage constructively on how to incorporate Loss and Damage as a separate and important element of the Paris agreement.
Finance for Loss and Damage is clearly a key issue in the negotiations, and must be separate from adaptation finance. ECO believes that France can make a difference here with its long history of championing innovative financing. We have high hopes that President Hollande will keep up the tradition this year, on the Financial Transaction Tax and beyond.
Not on track
The Structured Expert Dialogue (SED) finished up yesterday. The EU delegate surmised things aptly: “We are not on track.”
With over 19 presentations, the message was loud and clear. We are, unfortunately, on a path that sees warming going well above 2˚C. And there were 70 presentations documenting that even 2˚C warming is intolerable. We need to limit warming to 1.5˚C.
ECO is confident that these findings will be among the prominent results of the SED report coming out on March 20. And ECO hopes that policymakers will recognise the unique value of a dialogue informed by science and act accordingly.
Empty words on a page?
Some time ago, ECO was pleased to see the phrase “environmentally sound technologies” replaced with “economically, socially and environmentally sound technologies” in the context of technology transfer. The thinking was that the consideration of economic and social implications offered two crucial additional factors planners could use to predict the likely success of technology assimilation in a local setting.
It seemed that what would follow would be a process involving various stakeholders to clarify the meaning of these three terms in various local settings and circumstances—evaluate all three—and provide an opportunity to get real buy-in from intended users.
In the economic category, users might want assurance of a sustainable, long-term business model for the adoption and adaptation of technologies, and assurance that the introduction of new technologies would not result in massive economic displacement.
Likewise, in the social category, planners might want to understand the impacts of technology-induced change of social mores and culture on health, participation of women in the work force, and participation of the most vulnerable sectors of a community. In the environmental category, they might want to consider the risk that the adopted technology could cause unintended harm to complex and critical ecosystem services and biodiversity.
While reading Section H on Technology Transfer in the draft text, ECO noticed there was no hint of language on how these categories would actually improve planning or acceptance of technology on the ground, and it wondered why? Was “economically, socially and environmentally sound technologies” adopted as a literary exercise? Or would this phrase have actual meaning for locals on the receiving end of technology transfers? ECO was delighted to see that others were also concerned, as demonstrated when Pakistan raised this issue in yesterday’s ADP session.
ECO has a suggestion about how a technology review process might work. We believe transferred climate technologies must be reviewed for their potential economic, social and environmental impacts. However, this technology review process should not be burdensome on Parties. While recognising the sovereignty of Parties to review a given technology in a way that responds to their specific needs, we suggest the Technology Executive Committee take on the responsibility of “scanning the horizon” to recommend categories of technologies that might be in particular need of review. Furthermore, we suggest that the TEC maintain a database with information that Parties may consider while making their choices, thereby reducing their burden.
Finally, the Climate Technology Centre and Network should provide capacity building and full funding to developing countries, so that they can review technologies identified as being “higher-risk”, using their chosen experts. On the other hand, ECO’s view is that public funding should not be made available for the development, transfer and deployment of technologies identified as “high risk” in cases where countries choose not to conduct a review.
Workstream 2 is getting fashionable: Its about time

Being in the country of clocks and watchmakers has put ECO in the mood for WS2 negotiations. WS2 is all about being efficient with the little time we have left, to ensure that greenhouse gas emissions peak well before 2020, and to start the transition to a 100% renewable energy world. Negotiators are in dire need of a device to maximise their remaining time. While Parties have examined a wide range of potential parts, extolling the virtues of each, ECO believes the mechanics of a well-functioning device consist of only three pieces: renewable energy, energy efficiency and fossil fuel subsidy reform. By narrowing discussion to these specific initiatives, Parties can save debate time and focus on concrete, implementation-orientated conversations with experts. The technical papers of 2014 and the technical expert meetings have identified the potential of these three tools, and we have clear examples across the world of Parties taking steps to develop them in meaningful ways. Let us now look into the detailed work of how to scale up our preferred initiatives—the grease to make our time-maximising device work. Policy makers and those implementing these initiatives must frankly and plainly identify the challenges they face. Those providing support should then indicate how they can shift finance and technology to get the gears moving, while UNFCCC institutions and expert input can further smooth the workings. ECO will be looking for proposals that build on work already done in 2014, have high mitigation potential, are immediately scalable or replicable, contain strong sustainable development objectives and co-benefits and—most importantly—are implementation-oriented.

From: Langston James Goree VI <kimo@iisd.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2015   Subject: ENB Vol. 12 No. 622 – Geneva Climate Change Conference – February 2015 – Issue #3

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Langston James Goree VI kimo@iisd.org Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2015  Subject: ENB Vol. 12 No. 623 – Geneva Climate Change Conference – February 2015 – Issue #4

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Subject: climate-l digest: February 08, 2015 From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2015

Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Sunday, February 08, 2015. 1. ECO – Feb 9 – ADP2.8 2. Climate Policy Journal special issue on “Climate Policy for Technology Development and Transfer” 3. Climate Change Daily Feed – 9 February 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice 4. Bridges Trade BioRes, Vol. 9, No. 1 | Negotiating the new global climate deal 5. WHO Briefing on Health and Climate Change -  11 February 2015 – 08:30-10:00 hrs  Room  V, Palais des Nations 6. Deadline Reminder: First International Conference on Surface Transportation System Resilience to Climate Change and Extreme Weather Events, Abstracts Due February 13, 2015 7. APPLY NOW eCourse: ‘Policy Instruments for Low Emissions Development: From Design to Implementation’ 8. Extended deadline: Call for abstracts for a session on climate communication during ECCA 2015 9. New FAO Working Paper: Food security and adaptation impacts of potential climate smart agricultural practices in Zambia 10. New CARE, CIEL briefing paper | Climate change: tackling the greatest human rights challenge of our time 11. Climate Strategies & The Stanley Foundation INVITATION & CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Global Climate Policy Conference 2015 12. New report: Better use of climate information could reduce risks for African investors

Linh Do <linh@theverb.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2015 01:48:09 +0100 Subject: ECO – Feb 9 – ADP2.8

Hi all
Please find ECO below, for day two of the ADP 2.8 negotiations in Geneva.
For those who don’t know, ECO has been produced since 1972 as commentary to the environmental negotiations process.
Linh
Finance: What to put (back) into the text Negotiations will shift to the finance section of the elements text today, and there are several key items still missing—partly due to the weak outcomes in Lima—on climate finance. Here are a few examples of areas where the text must be strengthened. The idea of global collective targets for finance appears here and there in the text, but nowhere is it captured in a sufficiently comprehensive and clear manner. A durable agreement has to set collective targets for the provision of financial support to developing countries, one for mitigation, and one for adaptation – and regularly review and adjust these targets as part of the agreement cycles. In particular, a collective target for public finance for adaptation is key in light of the large gap between what is required and what is currently offered on that front. The agreement must include regular cycles of finance commitments by developed countries (and countries with similar responsibility and capability) to contribute to the fulfilment of the two targets mentioned above. So far, developed countries have completely rejected this concept – ahem! No commitments? Isn’t this what treaties are about? What you do and what I do (and what we do collectively)? To better understand where the gaps are, the Paris agreement should establish a process or mechanism that enables developing countries to iteratively identify the support they require for ambitious action, beyond what they can do without that support. New sources of finance is another item that makes an unsatisfactory appearance here and there in the text. To proceed in a more organised manner, ECO suggests a proper process to develop alternative sources of finance should be initiated to secure additional finance for the Adaptation Fund, the GCF and the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage. There are lots of potential sources out there to explore—revenues from the EU emission trading scheme or the forthcoming financial transaction tax, a global levy on fossil fuel extraction, and so forth. The point is that none of these will be unlocked if Parties doesn’t just get on with it. Phasing out fossil subsidies is also mentioned in the text, but only as a source of finance, even though it s a great tool to shift investments away from the dirty stuff. There is also no clear indication that finance will be shifted towards renewable energy and energy efficiency. ECO also suggests the inclusion of text that would lead to a code of conduct for responsible investments (for both public and private actors). This will help direct investment away from unsustainable fossil fuels and put in place social and environmental safeguards, including the do-no harm principle, as well as free, prior and informed consent for people affected by climate-related investments and for all actions with impact on people. “Speaking on behalf of the EU & Norway? Norway likes its image of the good student who always completes its homework, and is on time at that. And so too with its INDC. Last Friday, we saw the Norwegian government publish its new emission reduction targets for 2030. The idea is, surprisingly, to start negotiations with the EU, with the goal of being included in the entire EU climate framework—both ETS and non-ETS sectors. This would mean adopting all EU targets, including a 43% reduction in the ETS sector by 2030, and with a clear intention of buying as many ETS allowances as possible. The hope seems to be that this will reduce the need to bother the petroleum industry with more restrictions, and stop new regulations in the transport sector—an approach that may please some. The petroleum industry, increasingly active in the vulnerable Arctic, will soon have to face the reality that it has no place in the future renewable society. One good thing that might come out of this alignment with the EU is that Norway soon might feel a need to leave the Umbrella Group, which definitely is not good company for a model student. Do the math: 0 fossil + 100% renewables = 1 convention-compliant mitigation goal The final meetings of the Structured Expert Dialogue (SED) have begun! There are two life or death questions on the table: 1) “Is below 2°C enough to fulfil the goal of the convention?” and 2) “Is enough progress being made to achieve the goal?” The SED’s message is clear: science says warming of 2ºC will lead to numerous intolerable consequences that could be avoided if warming stays below 1.5ºC.   These consequences do threaten food security, increased extreme weather events, rising sea levels of more than 50cm with serious effects for many coastal zones and endanger the existence of several nations for starters. ECO is sadden by the reality that this list isn’t exhaustive.   Yesterday, AOSIS demonstrated what is required for the survival of many communities in small island states through proposing a “well-below 1.5ºC ” target to be included in the negotiation text for the Paris agreement.   Today, we hope more time is spent on on the second question. Real world evidence shows us: “no, impacts are worsening”, but experts still have an important part to play. When expertise and real world experience come together surely Parties have no choice but boosting their mitigation and adaptation ambition?   To be clear, whatever happens, we will have to phase out emissions to zero to reach any cap in warming, it is only a matter of timing. ECO is here to help with this advice: starting today, with completion by no later than 2050, we must phase out fossil fuels to zero and phase in 100% renewable energy.   Loss and Damage requires institutions and finance up to the taskDear delegates, perhaps you’ve lain awake at night wondering how you will feed your family now that your livestock has died in the most recent drought? Or perhaps you’ve wondered if your family can rebuild your home yet again after two typhoons in a row? Or how long your children will be able to live on your ancestral land that is being encroached upon by king tides? ECO can only assume that, at least for now, you’ve been spared the climate loss and damage that some of our most vulnerable kin are already experiencing. It is simply not possible to adapt to the worst impacts of climate change—this is why we must build institutions capable of dealing with this multi-faceted challenge. The Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage is a good start—but we must be vigilant to ensure it addresses the needs of the most vulnerable, and we must be open for new steps if it doesn’t suffice. Furthermore, we must secure a reliable source of finance for loss and damage—acknowledging that the lower the mitigation ambition is and the less adaptation support is provided, the more the costs of loss and damage will mount. It would only be fair to raise the necessary resources from those who are most responsible for the greenhouse gas emissions that are causing catastrophic climate change impacts. To: G20 Finance Ministers Subject Line: “Friendly reminder: Phase out fossil fuel subsidies”   As we get into the nitty-gritty of ADP negotiations here in Geneva, it is always important to keep in mind the events and discussions happening outside of the UNFCCC process. For those unaware, finance ministers from the G20 are gathering today and tomorrow in Turkey to discuss G20 priorities, two of which are climate change and climate finance this year.   From Geneva to Istanbul, we’d like to remind our finance ministers of a commitment their leaders made over 5 years ago: to phase out fossil fuel subsidies. It’s a pity that governments have to be reminded over and over again of their commitments, but we’ll keep doing so until they are fulfilled.   Last Friday, 40 NGOs from countries all over the world sent a letter to the Turkish G20 President and all G20 finance ministers, calling on the phase-out of fossil fuel subsidies. The letter called for the immediate elimination of production and exploration subsidies because, let’s face it, that money could be much better spent on climate action at home and abroad.   If the G20 really wants to prioritise climate change and climate finance, then ministers should tighten those purse strings and stop support for fossil fuels.   No Backsliding on the Road to Paris Switzerland was right to remind Parties yesterday afternoon that as countries achieve higher levels of development they should, over time, move towards economy-wide emissions budgets. This will help us stay within the remaining global carbon budget and also make the required infrastructure and other structural changes needed to phase out all fossil fuel emissions as early as possible and no later than 2050. But there’s more to it than that.  Kyoto Protocol Annex B countries in particular should recall that the principle of “no backsliding” means that their INDCs should be in the form of QELROs, which are in essence carbon budgets. It would not do, for example, if the EU simply put forward a 40% target for the year 2030 without mentioning the absolute cumulative emissions target. (Of course, the other glaring problem is that 40% should have been the EU target for 2020 . . .) Other countries with high responsibility and capability, such as the United States, also need to define the trajectories towards their emission reduction targets for specific years. For the US, this means defining the area under the curve towards the 26-28% reduction target for 2025. Others who have or have had QELROs in the past (that includes you, Canada!) should also present their INDCs as economy-wide emission budgets up to 2025 in the first commitment period of the Paris agreement. Today, there’s a group of countries not in Annex I of the Convention having high levels of responsibility and/or capability, including some with the highest per capita incomes in the world such as the UAE, Qatar, Singapore, Brunei, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Bahrain. These countries should also be working towards presenting an INDC in the form of an economy-wide emissions budget. Anything less than a carbon-budget based target would simply not be equitable. A conversation about differentiation: How about Tuesday night?   ECO hates to spoil the fun—and yesterday’s plenary was great—but we can’t help but wonder about the disconnect between the Lima compromise on CBDR&RC and the framing on differentiation throughout the current elements text.   The Lima compromise says “CBDR&RC, in light of national circumstances”. This, just to state the obvious, is very different from saying that developed countries will do X and developing countries will do Y. Speaking of X and Y, or annex X and annex Y, the differentiation question is already straining to break into open discussion.   Such discussion—especially if well-facilitated—would be an extremely good idea, and suggests to Parties that one of the 6-8 pm slots here in Geneva should be used to start the conversation. How about Tuesday night?   Where are the bunkers? In the final years of negotiations for the new climate agreement, it’s still not clear if it will include the fastest growing emissions sources—international aviation and shipping, also known as bunker fuels. CO2 emissions from international shipping and aviation were about 950 MT and 705 MT respectively in 2012; combined they account for as much emissions as Germany,  the sixth largest emitting country. When indirect effects are taken into account, the impact could already be approaching 10% of global climate forcing. In the almost 2 decades since the ICAO and IMO started discussing greenhouse gases, little concrete action has materialised, and scarily these emissions are on course to double or even treble by 2030. If emissions from these sectors are not addressed effectively by 2050, bunker emissions could swell to account for a quarter of all emissions. Such high emissions from the international transport sector would make it all but impossible to limit aggregate global warming to less than 2ºC as it would place an impossible emission reduction burden on other sectors. IMO and ICAO discussions have seen limited progress. Carbon neutral growth from 2020 is the most ambitious goal that the aviation sector has proposed, allowing emissions to grow to 2020 and then offsetting growth beyond that. This is far short of what is required for a 2ºC pathway, and there is little assurance that even these goals would be implemented. International shipping emissions are predicted to increase between 50% and 250% by 2050. The IMO suspended consideration of market-based measures in 2011, and the question of setting a global cap on shipping emissions is not on the IMO agenda. Efficiency regulations agreed for new ships will likely not have a significant impact for several decades, and the shipping industry is now fighting any new measures. At COP 21, the UNFCCC should mandate the setting of robust and meaningful reduction targets, as well as the adoption of mitigation measures that will ensure these sectors begin to play a fair and equal role in addressing dangerous climate change. ECO welcomes the introduction of text in the ADP yesterday which demands the setting of targets for emissions from these sectors consistent with staying below 2ºC.  Adaptation to bloom   Sunday’s opening negotiations concentrated on adding missing elements, and today it’s up to the adaptation negotiators to continue that work. Given the climate crisis that we face, sustainable development and poverty eradication will only be possible if all countries step up their adaptation efforts.   There is great value in having a country-driven process that requires regular updates on adaptation contributions from all countries, as well as a process that takes stock of progress already made and remaining challenges. And don’t forget all good things agreed in the Cancun Adaptation Framework, such as the list of adaptation activities in paragraph 14 of the CAF.   Adaptation action everywhere should follow key principles, such as promoting gender equality and the fulfilment of human rights, being participatory and taking into account the needs of particularly vulnerable people, communities and ecosystems.    ECO believes that agreeing on a strategic global vision—a global goal for adaptation—would be instrumental in triggering more adaptation action everywhere. This in turn builds the resilience of communities and ecosystems for the long term. The global goal for adaptation should reflect the relationship between the level of mitigation ambition and consequent adaptation needs due to projected climate change impacts and costs. The global goal for adaptation should also include an objective for public finance support for adaptation in developing countries.   The current text fails to reflect several interesting proposals made by developing country Parties. For instance, as long as the sum of mitigation contributions remains inadequate to put the world on a 1.5°C trajectory, adaptation planning and associated support need to take into account the actual and expected increase in temperature, not only the “agreed long-term temperature limit”.   The importance of good adaptation action monitoring allows for learning and accountability towards the citizens who need protection from climate change impacts. Let’s be sure the text adheres to the values of participatory, community- and citizen-based monitoring.

From: Heleen de Coninck h.deconinck@science.ru.nl Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2015   Subject: Climate Policy Journal special issue on “Climate Policy for Technology Development and Transfer”

Dear colleagues, A recent Climate Policy Journal special issue on Climate Policy for Technology Development and Transfer, co-guest-edited by Prof. Ambuj Sagar of IIT Delhi and myself, aims to offer insights to climate policy makers as to the nature of domestic policy in deploying climate mitigation technologies in developing countries, the role of firms in all countries involved in this process, and the linkages between domestic technology approaches and international climate policies. In addition, as a contribution to the policy research literature, the special issue takes forward the interdisciplinary discussion on how to advance technology transfer through better national and international climate policies. Three articles of the special issue are currently available free of charge:

If you are interested in any of the other articles, please feel free to contact me for a personal softcopy. We hope you find the papers useful and would welcome any comments and discussion! With kind regards, Heleen de Coninck Institute for Science, Innovation and Society Heleen de Coninck, Associate Professor Radboud University, Faculty of Science Phone:+31 24 3653254 | Mobile: +31 6 511 72794 Heyendaalseweg 135 (room HG02.529) | P.O. Box 9010 – Mailbox 77 | 6500 GL Nijmegen, Netherlands www.ru.nl/science/isis  |  h.deconinck@science.ru.nl  |  www.twitter.com/heleendeconinck From: IISD Reporting Services iisd-rs@iisd.org  Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2015  Subject: Climate Change Daily Feed – 9 February 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice

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Kimberley Botwright KBotwright@ictsd.ch  Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2015  Subject: Bridges Trade BioRes, Vol. 9, No. 1 | Negotiating the new global climate deal

Dear Climate-L readers, Please see below for the latest edition of Bridges Trade BioRes, a periodical focused on topics at the nexus of trade and the environment, published by the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD). The issue looks at the possible elements that could form part of a new global climate deal, which delegates from nearly 200 nations are currently negotiating at the UN Palais des Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. The issue also includes an interview with Michael Liebreich, Chairman of the Advisory Board and Founder of Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF), as well as material on the evolution of carbon trade governance, progress in the plurilateral Environmental Goods Agreement trade talks, and trade in the post-2015 development agenda. As always we appreciate your feedback and comments. Do get in touch. Cheers, Kimberley Botwright  ICTSD, Editor, Bridges Trade BioRes Tel: +41 (0)22.917.89.47 Tel: +41 (0)7.89.11.18.23 Skype: kimberley.botwright www.ictsd.org twitter.com/ICTSD_BioResfacebook.com/ICTSD_BioRes

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climate-l digest: February 02, 2015 From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Date: Tue, 03 Feb 2015

Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Monday, February 02, 2015. 1. UNCTAD Briefing session: Climate Change, SDGs and Trade – 10 February in Geneva 2. USAID Adapt Asia-Pacific e-Newsletter – January 2015 Edition 3. weADAPT: Local adaptation plans, vulnerability assessments, innovative methods of engagement and more…… 4. Who is doing more to save the planet? 5. ENVIRONMENTAL AND CLIMATE GUIDE FOR LOCAL ELECTIONS IN SPAIN IN MAY 2015 6. Upcoming WWF REDD+ Learning Session: Community-based monitoring, reporting and verification 7. Climate Change Daily Feed – 3 February 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice 8. APPLY NOW: eCourse-’Economics of Climate- Resilient Development’ 9. Valuing plant genetic resources to mitigate climate change impacts

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Henrique Pacini henrique.pacini@energy.kth.se  Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2015  Subject: UNCTAD Briefing session: Climate Change, SDGs and Trade – 10 February in Geneva

Briefing for Geneva-based Delegates on Climate Change, SDGs and Trade: At the crossroads of sustainable development
10 February 2015 10:00-13:00 hrs., Room XXVI, Palais des Nations Geneva, Switzerland

Three major negotiations involving climate change, SDGs and trade will mark the 2015 development agenda:

  1. The climate negotiations, which will culminate in the summit in Paris, in December 2015.
  2. The intergovernmental negotiations on post-2015 development agenda.
  3. The Doha Round negotiations in the WTO.

While distinctly different, all these negotiating tracks share a number of important policy “markers” with sustainable development. In all three, it can be argued that trade serves as an enabler in the long run, ensuring the implementation of any eventual agreement is inclusive within across countries. UNCTAD’s role will be affected by the outcomes of these negotiations as well as that of the 14th UNCTAD Conference (UNCTAD XIV) in Lima in 2016. In the light of these negotiations, and in view of the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (ADP) negotiations taking place in Geneva, this briefing session aims to inform delegates about the issues at stake, their linkages and possible impact on the environment, trade and development. Full programme available at:  http://unctad.org/en/Pages/MeetingDetails.aspx?meetingid=734For information please contact: henrique.pacini@unctad.org

: Augustine Kwan <kwan@iges.or.jp     Tue, 3 Feb 2015 Subject: USAID Adapt Asia-Pacific e-Newsletter – January 2015 Edition

Dear Climate-L readers, Learn more about how USAID Adapt Asia-Pacific is working with countries in the region to improve their access to climate change adaptation financing. The January 2015 edition of the USAID Adapt Asia-Pacific e-Newsletter features stories on: 1.      The project’s support to India’s National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) to access US$3.2 million and more from the Adaptation Fund http://adaptasiapacific.org/news/usaid-adapt-asia-pacific-it-takes-time-and-effort-get-money-climate-change 2.      The need for Thai officials to better understand the economics behind climate change adaptation options. http://adaptasiapacific.org/news/learning-assess-economic-value-climate-change-adaptation 3.      A new USAID online gender sourcebook that helps support efforts to incorporate gender issues into climate change adaptation projects http://adaptasiapacific.org/news/usaid-adapt-asia-pacific-launches-online-sourcebook-supports-women%E2%80%99s-empowerment-asia For more details on USAID Adapt Asia-Pacific’s capacity building and project preparation initiatives, please email: info@adapt-asia.org Kind regards, Augustine KWAN (Mr) Knowledge and Outreach Manager IGES Regional Centre | Asia Pacific Adaptation Network | USAID Adapt Asia-Pacific Tel +66 (0) 2-651-8797 ext. 17 | Fax +66 (0) 2-651-8798 604 SG Tower, 6th Floor, 161/1 Soi Mahadlek Luang 3 Rajdamri Road, Patumwan, Bangkok, 10330  Thailand www.iges.or.jp | www.asiapacificadapt.net | Facebook | Twitter

USAID Adapt Asia-Pacific e-Newsletter Issue 10 | January 2015 View this email in your browser

USAID Adapt Asia-Pacific | info@adapt-asia.org | USAID / Climate Change Adaptation Project Preparation Facility for Asia and the Pacific | AECOM International Development, SG Tower, 5th Floor, Unit 506 161/1, Mahadlek Luang, Rajdamri Rd., Patumwan | Bangkok, Bangkok 10330, Thailand

From: Sukaina Bharwani sukaina.bharwani@sei-international.org Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2015   Subject: weADAPT: Local adaptation plans, vulnerability assessments, innovative methods of engagement and more……

New climate change adaptation articles on weADAPT

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Dr. Sukaina Bharwani | Senior Research Fellow | Stockholm Environment Institute
29 Grove Street, OXFORD, OX2 7JT, UK
T: +44 1865 355605 | Skype: sukaina_b | Twitter: @weADAPT1
QuickShare your climate adaptation projects with the weADAPT CommunityCheck out the latest content in weADAPT’s Newsletter
Find weADAPT on: Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter | Google+

———- Doorgestuurd bericht ———- From: Kiran Pandey <kiran@cseindia.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2015 17:32:57 +0530 Subject: Who is doing more to save the planet?

Who is doing more to save the planet?   The recently-released 2015 Climate Change Performance Index shows a new “record” in global energy related CO2 emissions.Please take a look at this interactive prepared by the India environment portal to know how different countries across the world are performing on climate change parameters and why one country is better than the other. http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/media/iep/infographics/CCIP-2015/index.html   Kiran Pandey Programme Director India Environment Portal Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) New Delhi India   Visit India Environment Portal http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/ Follow On Twitter https://twitter.com/indiaenvportal Be our friend and like us on Facebook http://ow.ly/GZsfb From: jesus gamero <jesumarcos@yahoo.es>   Date: Tue, 03 Feb 2015 Subject: ENVIRONMENTAL AND CLIMATE GUIDE FOR LOCAL ELECTIONS IN SPAIN IN MAY 2015 A project has been launched called “Guía Climática para las elecciones municipales de mayo 2015″, which aims to provide climate and environmental ideas and arguments to local political groups in Spain during the drafting of their electoral programs in the upcoming municipal elections in May. The guide covers aspects of climate advocacy, the importance of political leadership and communication when talking and implementing climate policies, the integration of climate policy as a crosscutting theme in government action, or the recognition of climate policies and green economy as a way to overcome the crisis, create jobs and reduce the growing poverty and inequality. In this sense, the guide include proposals and more specific ideas for areas covering energy, mobility, education and participation, management of green spaces, urban agriculture and waste management among others. The project is conducted by Jesús Marcos Gamero, Doctor in Social Analysis by the University Carlos III of Madrid and a specialist in the study of the social and political dimensions of Climate Change and the answers should be given to this phenomenon from these areas. The guide has the support of the Research Group in Sociology of Climate Change and Sustainable Development of the University Carlos III and the Local Community Association NUBER-Getafe. The proposal is structured around a website www.guiaclimatica2015.blogspot.com and the document guide itself that can be downloaded from the website. The project is recognized as a dynamic, moving beyond the dissemination of ideas and proposals among local political groups for the election period, aiming also to reflect and recognize the commitment of  different electoral programs in this field. Ultimately, the guide will collect the most interested findings and proposals during this process in order to support and provide an updated document to the new local elected government from June 2015. The guide proposes to provide support to all local political groups, who so wish, throughout Spain. The reason, in words of its author has to do with the “need to raise environmental and climate discourse among political groups, avoiding a partisan use of it”. Similarly, this guide aims to “try to break the dynamic, quite common to electoral processes, where discussion between parties is based on mutual critics, and does little to create a debate of ideas and projects beneficial to the public”. The author states that “obviously, the guide is not a complete work and there always gaps to fill”, considering the importance of adapting, by local political formations, the lines proposed in the guide to each context and local realities. He also considers that “the purpose of this paper is to provide an incentive for other similar initiatives that will be carried out in this electoral process”, calling for action to “other research groups, organizations and neighborhood groups, for both at the state level and at a more local level, to demand to political formations to recognize as fundamental in policymaking the environmental and climate component, and its recognition within their electoral commitments”. For more information about the project you can contact Dr.Gamero by email jmgamerorus@yahoo.es or via twitter @jmgamerorus Direct link to the document (in Spanish) through: https://sites.google.com/site/guiaclimatica2015/pdf/guia%20climatica%20elecciones%202015.pdf?attredirects=0&d=1 ———- Doorgestuurd bericht ———- From: ”Byrnes, Breen” <Breen.Byrnes@wwfus.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2015 13:47:58 +0000 Subject: Upcoming WWF REDD+ Learning Session: Community-based monitoring, reporting and verification

 

  Dear All, Please join us for the next WWF Forest and Climate Programme online REDD+ Learning Sessionon Thursday, February 19 at 9:30am EST/3:30pm CET. Topic: Community-based monitoring, reporting and verification When: Thursday, February 19 at 9:30am EST/3:30pm CET What: In this session, presenters from the WWF Forest and Climate Programme and the Global Canopy Programme will highlight the relevance of community-based monitoring, reporting and verification for REDD+, share tools and technologies that can make it more effective, discuss enabling conditions, and wrap up with key lessons learned. The session is based on outcomes from a recent workshop on the topic held in Guyana with participants from around the world. A Q+A session will follow the presentation Registerhttps://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6861563150451243777 This is a free, open event. It will be recorded and made available afterwards for those who are unable to join us.   Thanks, Breen Breen Byrnes |  Manager, Communications +  Learning  WWF Forest & Climate Programme  |  Washington, DC direct: +1-202-495-4518  |   |  skype: breen.byrnesbreen.byrnes@wwfus.org  |  panda.org/forestclimate twitter.com/wwfforestcarbon   |  wwfforestandclimate.tumblr.com   Subscribe to our weekly email REDD+ Resources Digest and quarterly e-newsletter today! Join the REDD+ Community and connect with REDD+ practitioners from around the globe!

IISD Reporting Services <iisd-rs@iisd.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Tue, 03 Feb 2015   Subject: Climate Change Daily Feed – 3 February 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice

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Subject: climate-l digest: January 29, 2015 From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015

Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Thursday, January 29, 2015. 1. Early Lessons from Jurisdictional REDD+ and Low Emissions Development Programs 2. Model UNFCCC Paris meetings 3. Second European Climate Change Adapation conference (ECCA2015) 4. Invitation to webinar: February 3rd Tuesday 2015 – Lima Outcomes and Towards Paris COP21 5. Webinar: Update on The Global Innovation Lab for Climate Finance Instruments 6. January’s 32 Top Resources: Climate | Adaptation | Climate Smart Ag. | Climate Finance 7. OzoNews Vol. XV, 30 January  2015 issue. 8. Webinar: REDD+ y la Conservación de la Biodiversidad 9. Beyond REDD+ readiness: land-use governance to reduce deforestation in Peru ——— If you are not worldviewmission@gmail.com and would like to join the climate-l Mailing List, please click here to SUBSCRIBE: –join-climate-l@lists.iisd.ca

Janique Francis <jfrancis@tnc.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 08:57:50 -0600 Subject: Early Lessons from Jurisdictional REDD+ and Low Emissions Development Programs The Nature Conservancy and the World Bank’s Forest Carbon Partnership Facility have released a new report, Early Lessons from Jurisdictional REDD+ and Low Emissions Development Programs, which features eight REDD+/LED programs worldwide and provides insights into the dynamics and realities on the ground experienced by these jurisdictions in their efforts to reduce forest related emissions. The report serves as a resource for practitioners, forest country governments, donors and others working to advance jurisdictional REDD+ and LED models at a large landscape scale. Find out what common challenges jurisdictional programs face around the world and learn about what opportunities exist for future success. Click on the following link to access the study: http://www.nature.org/media/climatechange/REDD+_LED_Programs.pdf From: gillogly@uwp.edu    Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015  Subject: Model UNFCCC Paris meetings Hi, all, and my apologies if this is something that others have already asked. In Fall 2015, my program (Center for International Studies) is going to hold a Model UN Climate Change activity. It will parallel and anticipate Paris 2015. We’re excited about it, have high school teachers on board (for those who do not know, the “model” activities allow high school students to role play, like a World Court activity, or the Model Organization of American States), and we’re planning. But it occurs to me that we might be reinventing the wheel. I have not found any specific online sites or other sources that have a program for a Model UNFCCC in place. So, I’m asking. Is anyone else developing a similar program for high school students? We should work together. Or, please send me links if you think it sounds like there’s something I’ve missed (we have lots of links for all sorts of other Model UN activities, but not for Paris 2015). You can contact me at gillogly@uwp.edu. Thanks much, Kate Gillogly Associate Professor, Anthropology Director, Center for International Studies University of Wisconsin-Parkside hasa@dmu.dk To:  Cc:  Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015   Subject: S

econd European Climate Change Adapation conference (ECCA2015) The deadline for the first call for abstracts to the ECCA2015 is Monday 2/2, via the website: www.ecca2015.eu Sincerely, – Hans Sanderson From: Mona Ludigkeitmona.ludigkeit@iclei.org  Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015  Subject: Invitation to webinar: February 3rd Tuesday 2015 – Lima Outcomes and Towards Paris COP21

Dear all, I am pleased to share with you the webinar invitation below.
Webinar: Lima Outcomes and Towards Paris
On February 3nd Tuesday 2015, at 10:00am, and at 04:00pm CET ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability is hosting two webinars on the  outcomes of the UN Climate Change Conference (COP20/CMP10) in Lima,  Peru, with relevance to local and sub-national governments. The session  includes information on the vision towards COP21/CMP11 in Paris, and on  notable events leading up to it. Hosted by: Yunus Arikan, Head of Global Policy and Advocacy, ICLEI ·  Feb 3, 2015 10:00 AM CET ·  Feb 3, 2015  4:00 PM CET Please register for the date and time that works best for you in the links above. We look forward to welcoming you! Best regards, Mona Ludigkeit Officer Low Carbon Cities
Bonn Center for Local Climate Action and Reporting (carbonn Center)
ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability World Secretariat Kaiser-Friedrich-Str. 7 53113 Bonn Germany Tel. +49-228 / 97 62 99-23         Fax +49-228 / 97 62 99-01 www: www.iclei.org/lowcarboncity Twitter: @ICLEI_carbonn Please subscribe: Subscribe to our regular Low Carbon City News
Skype: iclei.mona.ludigkeit
ICLEI is the world’s leading network of over 1,000 cities, towns and metropolises committed
to building

a sustainable future. By helping our

M

embers to make their cities

sustainable,

low-carbon, resilient, biodiverse, resource-efficient, healthy and happy, with a  green economy and smart infrastructure, we impact over 20% of the global population.

http://worldcongress2015.iclei.org/home.html

Register now for the

ICLEI World Congress 2015, taking place from 8 - 12 April 2015 in Seoul, Republic of Korea, with the theme ’Sustainable Solutions for an Urban Future’. See www.iclei.org/worldcongress2015 for more information.

Claire Painter Claire.Painter@cpivenice.org Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015  Subject: Webinar: Update on The Global Innovation Lab for Climate Finance Instruments

Dear Colleague, Please join us for a webinar on Tuesday, February 10 at 10am ET / 4pm CET / 3pm GMT. The Global Innovation Lab for Climate Finance is a new, global initiative that draws on expertise from around the world to design and pilot the next generation of cutting edge climate finance instruments. Based on proposals from around the world, The Lab identified instruments that have potential to drive climate investment in developing countries at scale. The Lab is taking several of these forward with further analysis and stress-testing to prepare them for piloting, including:

  • ·         The Climate Development & Finance Facility, which aims to create a new entity to provide fast-track finance to climate mitigation projects;
  • ·         Energy Savings Insurance, which would guarantee financial savings from company energy efficiency investments, mitigating a financial barrier to those investments;
  • ·         The Long-term Currency Swap, which would catalyze renewable energy investment in developing countries by mitigating exchange rate risk and supporting the development of commercial currency swap markets; and
  • ·         Agricultural Supply Chain Adaptation Facility, which would provide long-term finance for investments in climate-resilience and knowledge to farmers along the supply chain of agricultural businesses.

The webinar will give participants an opportunity to learn more about these innovative instruments, The Lab’s progress, and next steps. The 40-minute presentation by CPI, The Lab’s Secretariat, will be followed by an opportunity to ask question. Register now; space is limited. Thank you,   Claire Painter Senior Associate, Climate Policy Initiative Secretariat, The Global Innovation Lab for Climate Finance

From: Tim Magee tim.magee@csd-i.org Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 Subject: January’s 32 Top Resources: Climate | Adaptation | Climate Smart Ag. | Climate Finance

January 2015 CSDi Community Based Adaptation to Climate Change Newsletter January’s 32 Top Resources: Climate | Adaptation | Climate Smart Ag. | Climate Finance Dear Climate-L Colleagues, We encounter so many excellent adaptation and climate change resources that we are sharing them in a special issue newsletter:http://www.csd-i.org/csdi-blog/2015/1/29/januarys-32-top-resources-climate-change-finance-adaptation.html                                                                                            January Newsletter Summary:Find current, downloadable tools and documents on these and other themes:

  • Climate Training Kit
  • Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action (NAMA) Sustainable Development Evaluation Tool
  • Update of the FAOSTAT Emissions database for Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use
  • Implementing the EU 2030 Climate and Energy Framework
  • What does the Lima Call for Climate Action mean for Africa?
  • Shifting Paradigms – Unpacking Transformation for Climate Action: A Guidebook for Climate Finance and Development Practitioners
  • Going in the right direction? Tracking adaptation finance at the subnational level
  • Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning
  • Approaches to Assessment of Impacts and Vulnerability to Climate Change and Adaptation Options
  • Community Based Adaptation: an empowering approach for climate resilient development and risk reduction
  • Investment in Climate Change Adaptation can Help Promote the Livelihoods of 65% of Africans, finds new report
  • Local approaches to harmonising climate adaptation and disaster risk reduction policies: Lessons from India
  • Seven Climate-Smart Agriculture Country Profiles
  • Beyond Downscaling: A Bottom-Up Approach to Climate Adaptation for Water Resources Management.
  • Gender and Climate Change Adaptation in Agrarian Settings
  • Coping With Heat in the Garden: Drought-Tolerant Crops, Resilient Perennials and More

Link: January Newsletter Questions? Please feel free to contact me. Sincerely, Tim Magee Center for Sustainable Development Tim Magee is the author of A Field Guide to Community Based Adaptation published by Routledge, Oxford, England. Read: Table of Contents, Howard White’s Forward and Tim Magee’s Introduction.

Center for Sustainable DevelopmentTim MageeExecutive Director

724 Via Santo Tomas Claremont, CA  91711 Tim.Magee@csd-i.org http://www.csd-i.org/Guatemala Office6 Avenida “A” 13-41 Zona 9Ciudad Guatemala, Guatemala Centro AméricaBe sure to visit CSDi’s Development Community and join over 800 colleagues in sharing resources & collaborating online.Like us on Facebook

The Center for Sustainable Development specializes in providing sound, evidence-based information, tools and training for humanitarian development professionals worldwide. CSDi is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Samira Korban-de Gobert samira.degobert@unep.org Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 Subject: OzoNews Vol. XV, 30 January  2015 issue. We are pleased to share the OzoNews Vol. XV, 30 January  2015 issue. Click the link below to access short version of current and previous issues.http://bit.ly/1xlzNvD OzoNews is disseminated twice a month by email. Full version is available to subscribed readers (free subscription @ http://bit.ly/1xlzNvD). OzoNews is an update of current news stories relating to ozone layer and climate protection and the implementation of the Montreal Protocol. Feel free to contact me should you have any question related to OzoNews, or if you would like to subscribe, invite new subscribers, submit ideas, links or news items/articles on your activities related to ozone layer protection and the Montreal Protocol for future OzoNews issues. Best regards, Samira ……………………… Samira Korban-de Gobert, OzonAction Programme-Information Exchange, United Nations Environment Programme, Division of Technology, Industry and Economics (UNEP DTIE) 15 rue de Milan, 75441 Paris CEDEX 09 • France Tel.(33) 1 44 37 14 52, Fax (33) 1 44 37 14 74 Cel. (33) 6 85 60 85 66 Samira.deGobert@unep.orghttp://www.unep.org/ozonaction/ The “Montreal Protocol Who’s Who”, Learn more/nominate >> http://bit.ly/1uaD3W1From: ”Kindberg, Leif” Leif.Kindberg@tetratech.com Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015  Subject: Webinar: REDD+ y la Conservación de la Biodiversidad

Webinar: REDD+ y la Conservación de la Biodiversidad Los invitamos a participar de este seminario virtual sobre REDD+ y la Conservación de la Biodiversidad organizado por la Comunidad de Práctica de REDD+ de la Plataforma Finanzas Carbono del Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID) y el Programa Forest Carbon, Markets and Communities (FCMC). Diversos esfuerzos iniciales para establecer programas nacionales de REDD+ muestran indicios que los países están diseñándolos de forma tal que se puedan generar efectos positivos en la biodiversidad. Sin embargo, debido a que la mayoría de estos programas aún se encuentran en sus etapas iniciales de desarrollo, todavía muchos carecen de más pormenores sobre sus objetivos relativos a la biodiversidad, al igual que de acciones especificas o planes de monitoreo para su conservación. A pesar de ello, algunos análisis de actividades tempranas de REDD+ indican que la consideración de los beneficios potenciales de REDD+ a la biodiversidad requiere tomar decisions que explícitamente toman en cuenta la biodiversidad a lo largo de la planificación e implementación de REDD+. Las acciones de coordinación y planificación entre las instancias u oficinas que gestionan REDD+ y la biodiversidad pueden ser mejoradas a un bajo costo, lo cual podría ayudar a concretizar potenciales sinergias entre REDD+ y la conservación de la biodiversidad. Entre tanto, muchas de las experiencias con proyectos de carbono forestal sugieren que REDD+ tiene el potencial de generar beneficios considerables para la biodiversidad, en especial si estos proyectos identifican claros objetivos al respecto, al igual que acciones y sistemas adecuados de monitoreo para lograrlos. ¿Cuándo? Jueves 5 de Febrero 2015 desde las 11 am hasta las 12 m (EST) Las presentaciones se realizarán en Español Expositores:

  • Catalina Santamaria (Secretaría de la Convención de Diversidad Biológica de Naciones Unidas)
  • Valerie Kapos (Programa de Cambio Climático y Biodiversidad del UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre)
  • Steven Panfil (Conservación Internacional)

¿Cómo participar? Podrás acceder al webinar en la fecha y hora indicada haciendo click en: http://bit.ly/1u1YEan Si no estás registrado y/ o afiliado a las Comunidades de la Plataforma, te invitamos a ser parte de las mismas para poder participar en todas las actividades que se desarrollan. Puedes hacerlo ahora ingresando a finanzascarbono.org/comunidad/pg/login. Cualquier inquietud no dudes en consultarnos: Atentamente, El Equipo de la Comunidad de Práctica de REDD+ de la Plataforma Finanzas Carbono http://finanzascarbono.org Leif Kindberg | Associate Environment and Natural Resources P. 703.387.5513 Skype | lkindbe leif.kindberg@tetratech.com Tetra Tech 1320 N. Courthouse Rd, Suite 600 | Arlington, VA 22201 www.tetratech.com/intdev

Angel Daniel Armas <angearmas@gmail.com> To:  Cc:  Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 10:19:42 -0500 Subject: Beyond REDD+ readiness: land-use governance to reduce deforestation in Peru

Dear all,

I am pleased to share this paper based on a research work aiming to assess the REDD+ Readiness state of the art in Peru. This article presents the outcomes of a multi-dimensional assessment of the REDD + readiness process in Peru. The six key functions in the analytical framework provide the opportunity to evaluate the process in an integrated and systematic manner and highlights the persistence of complex, transversal governance challenges across diverse economic sectors and government agencies. Research findings also reveal a need for policy change and continued investment to ensure success of the national process in Peru. Strong leadership is needed to generate consensus in cross-sectoral negotiations and to establish coordinated land governance and monitoring mechanisms.

You can download the paper from http://bit.ly/1ERGPLQ
Best regards,
MSc. Angel ARMAS Forest and Climate Change Specialist Science and Technology Researcher Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung Alumni http://www.humboldt-foundation.de/web/home.html
Phone: 995160713/986811519 Skype: daniel.armas.figueroa

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climate-l digest: January 28, 2015 From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015

Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Wednesday, January 28, 2015. 1. Women’s Climate Collaborative Announces Webinar: “Lean In to Fight Climate Change” — Scheduled for Feb. 12, 2015 2. ACCO/Duke Research Project on Climate Governance in U.S. and Canadian Government Entities 3. CDF Publications: Low Carbon Finance for the State of Tamil Nadu 4. CDF Publications: Fiscal Instruments for Low Carbon Transport in Chennai 5. New Woking paper: Enhancing Readiness Programs for the Green Climate Fund 6. CDF Publications: Fiscal Instruments for Environment and Climate Change 7. Climate Change Job Vacancies Update – 29 January 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice 8. News from the World Bank Group: New reports on carbon pricing, offset programs and private sector company case studies 9. First Issuance of SOCIALCARBON VCUS on APX VCS Registry

events@accoevents.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 18:03:05 -0700 Subject: Women’s Climate Collaborative Announces Webinar: “Lean In to Fight Climate Change” — Scheduled for Feb. 12, 2015

Dear Colleagues -
The Women’s Climate Collaborative, a program of the Association of Climate Change Officers, recently announced its first webinar titled “Lean in to Fight Climate Change” — it is scheduled for Thursday, February 12 at 12pm (eastern).  I think you’ll find this to be a meaningful discussion highlighting opportunities for strategic climate action in and by large organizations across sectors, leadership strategies inspired by Sheryl Sandberg’s book “Lean In,” and a good opportunity engage to collaborate with peers.  The announcement is below for your reference.
Best regards,
Daniel Kreeger
Executive Director Association of Climate Change Officers
Women’s Climate Collaborative Webinar: Lean In to Fight Climate Change Thursday, February 12, 2015 (12:00-1:00pm eastern)
This is the first of a series of webinars presented by the Women’s Climate Collaborative (WCC). In ‘Lean In to Fight Climate Change’ we will summarize the current status of carbon mitigation in the U.S., discuss the challenges professional women face in moving the needle on climate change in their organizations, and map out the WCC’s role in supporting those efforts. Webinar presenters will also discuss the data and information provided in Sheryl Sandberg’s “Lean In,” which examines why women’s progress in achieving leadership roles has stalled, explains root causes, and offers compelling, commonsense solutions that can empower professionals regardless of gender to achieve greater success within their organizations and in support of their missions/responsibilities.
Takeaways:
  • Identification and understanding of challenges driving climate action within a large organization
  • Leadership strategies and tools inspired by “Lean In”
  • Opportunities to engage with peers in a collaborative forum
About the Women’s Climate Collaborative
The Women’s Climate Collaborative (WCC) positions women to demonstrate leadership and advance their careers by leveraging strengths, capabilities and skills, while harnessing their commitment to address climate change.  The WCC was established to encourage and promote the professional advancement of women in the climate and sustainability professions. In particular, the WCC will increase public awareness of the powerful work being done by professional women in addressing climate change.
Learn more at:www.WomensClimate.org
Webinar Presenters
Connie SasalaChief Sustainability Officer Cameron-Cole, LLC
Margery MooreDirector of Environmental Strategic Alliances Bloomberg BNA
Daniel KreegerExecutive Director Association of Climate Change Officers

events@accoevents.org Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015   Subject: ACCO/Duke Research Project on Climate Governance in U.S. and Canadian Government Entities

Dear Colleagues -
The Association of Climate Change Officers recently announced a joint research project with a team of graduate students at the Duke University Nicholas School for the Environment that will examine climate governance structures and trends in U.S. and Canadian government entities.  The finds from this research will support ACCO’s education and training programs and enable development of actionable resources.
If you know of an individual who would be a suitable respondent for the questionnaire referenced in the announcement below, please pass this along accordingly.  If you work in a government agency/entity and are able to provide insight for this effort, please respond using the link in the announcement below.
Best regards,
Daniel Kreeger
Executive Director Association of Climate Change Officers
     
Climate Change Governance Trends in U.S. and Canadian Public Sector Entities A Joint Study Project Between ACCO and the Duke University Nicholas School for the Environment
ACCO and a team of graduate students at the Duke University Nicholas School of the Environment are fostering an examination of trends related to governance and management of climate initiatives in government organizations in the United States and Canada at local, state/provincial and national levels. As the impacts of climate change are being increasingly felt and a large number of initiatives are moving forward concurrently, there are likely to be challenges in jurisdictional cooperation, funding and authority that may be addressed through sound governance structures and management processes. Fragmented governance structures impede efficient policy­making, effective allocation of resources and enterprise management of risk and response strategies.
Method
By surveying over 600 government officials involved in climate change governance in the public sector, this project aims to investigate U.S. and Canadian climate change mitigation and adaptation governance structures, identify structures that have been successful in the early stages of climate action, and provide lessons learned from instances where structures failed to enable appropriate responses. Specifically, the research team will:
  • Systematically summarize organizational structures for U.S. and Canadian climate change mitigation and adaptation governance at the local, state/provincial and national levels
  • Analyze the drivers of effective and efficient climate change policy formulation and implementation
  • Examine trends and make recommendations for the roles and responsibilities of climate change leadership
Project Aspirations
With climate change initiatives rapidly expanding, this report can be used to identify future structural steps agencies can take based on the experiences of leading-edge practitioners. The findings from this effort can be used when proposing budgets, hiring staff, modifying job descriptions, and establishing governance structures and performance metrics. This research will also help facilitate inter­departmental, inter­state, or regional collaboration by providing clarity on decision-making authorities from one institution to the next.
Data
The final research product will be shared with all participants and also published on the ACCO and Duke University websites.
U.S. or Canadian government employees whose work includes supporting or leading climate change initiatives in their organizations shouldCLICK HERE to take our short survey.
If you have any questions about this study, please email dukeproject@ACCOonline.org.
We Need Your Help
We are asking government institutions to help us reach out to the individual(s) who would serve as the most appropriate respondent(s) for this research project.
Please forward this announcement to any individuals you believe might contribute to this research .
Research Supervisor
Phil SantiagoKnowledge Center Program Manager Association of Climate Change Officers

sabnam.gafoor@ifmr.ac.in Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015

Subject: CDF Publications: Low Carbon Finance for the State of Tamil Nadu Dear Climate-L colleagues,

I am pleased to share with you Centre for Development Finance’s latest publication on “Low Carbon Finance for the State of Tamil Nadu: Investments, Gaps, and Barriers”, which assesses the current status of the low carbon finance landscape in the State of Tamil Nadu.Please find the report attached herewith. While India is contemplating various institutional arrangements to mobilize funds from the Green Climate Fund, States should also assess their respective capacities to absorb such funds. Measuring the quantum and effectiveness of current low carbon investments is a step in that direction. Now that almost all Indian States have developed their State Action Plans on Climate Change, it is also recommended that they adopt a common methodology in order to track and compare their low carbon investments and gaps, and be prepared to access international funds once the mechanisms and funds are in place. Although the immediate results and findings of the publications are relevant to Tamil Nadu, some of the broader strategies and in particular, the approach and analytical frameworks used to arrive at these findings, would be applicable to and potentially useful for all Indian States. I hope you will find the reports and the recommendations useful. If you have any questions or would like to discuss any aspects of the report, please feel free to contact Ms. Sunanda Rathi, Research Associate, Environment and Climate Change Group, Centre for Development Finance, IFMR LEAD at sunanda.rathi@ifmr.ac.in. Thanking you,

With kind regards,

Sabnam Gafoor Research Associate Environment and Climate Change Group Centre for Development Finance IFMR LEAD

sabnam.gafoor@ifmr.ac.in  Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015

Subject: CDF Publications: Fiscal Instruments for Low Carbon Transport in Chennai Dear Climate-L colleagues, I am pleased to share with you Centre for Development Finance’s latest publication on “Fiscal Instruments for Low Carbon Transport in Chennai”, which examines the feasibility of implementing a congestion tax for the city of Chennai in the State of Tamil Nadu. Please read the report here: http://www.ifmrlead.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Report_2_Fiscal_Instruments_for_Low_Carbon_Transport_in_Chennai.pdf Chennai ranks one of the highest among all South Asian cities in terms of GHG emissions as well emissions of other criteria pollutants, especially NOx and PM10. The city also suffers from heavy volumes of traffic and congestion, particularly on the arterial roads. Several proposals have been discussed by the Chennai Corporation, in the recent past, to tackle these twin problems of congestion and pollution. Some of the options that are being considered include congestion tax, electronic road pricing, and ramp metering.This study represents an attempt to analyse one such option by quantifying the costs of congestion for the city of Chennai and making recommendations regarding levying a per trip charge in heavily congested corridors of the city. Although the immediate results and findings of the publications are relevant to Tamil Nadu, some of the broader strategies and in particular, the approach and analytical frameworks used to arrive at these findings, would be applicable to and potentially useful for all Indian States. I hope you will find the reports and the recommendations useful. If you have any questions or would like to discuss any aspects of the report, please feel free to contact Ms. Sunanda Rathi, Research Associate, Environment and Climate Change Group, Centre for Development Finance, IFMR LEAD at sunanda.rathi@ifmr.ac.in. Thanking you, With kind regards, Sabnam Gafoor Research Associate Environment and Climate Change Group Centre for Development Finance IFMR LEAD

Sudo.Tomonori@jica.go.jp To:  Cc:  Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015

Subject: New Woking paper: Enhancing Readiness Programs for the Green Climate Fund Dear Climate-L Readers,

We are pleased to announce that new Working Paper entitled “Enhancing Readiness Programs for the Green Climate Fund,” co-authored by Eunkyoung Hong, Senior Researcher  of the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) and Tomonori Sudo, Senior Research Fellow of JICA-RI was released.
Title: Enhancing Readiness Programs for the Green Climate Fund Author: Eunkyoung Hong (KOICA), Tomonori Sudo (JICA Research Institute), Language: English Abstract: This paper provides practical information for both donors and recipients to be prepared for the readiness program of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) and also to identify the issues of the existing readiness program. Specifically, this paper attempts to focus on the needs of developing countries in the context of climate finance and issues of GCF readiness. In this paper, four gaps between current readiness programs and recipient expectations are identified: 1) gap in the capacity for the direct approach, 2) gap in readiness for the private sector, 3) gap in experiences in the development field, and 4) gap in the absorptive capacity of funds by the recipient. Furthermore, this paper also identified the uniqueness of the fiduciary standards of GCF by comparing with those of other climate funds. To fill the above gaps, five policy recommendations are presented. With best regards,
Tomonori SUDO, Ph.D., Senior Research Fellow, JICA Research Institute

sabnam.gafoor@ifmr.ac.in To:  Cc:  Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 03:39:28 -0600 Subject: CDF Publications: Fiscal Instruments for Environment and Climate Change Dear Climate-L colleagues, I am pleased to share with you Centre for Development Finance’s latest publications on “Fiscal Instruments for Environment and Climate Change: Experiences from Indian States”, which compiles experiences from some of these States that have implemented fiscal instruments to address environmental and climate issues. Please read the report and the policy briefs here: http://ifmrlead.org/fiscal-instruments-for-environment-and-climate-change-experiences-from-indian-states/ Greenhouse gases (GHGs) and other pollutants impose negative externalities in the form of additional costs on the entire society. Given India’s voluntary domestic commitment to reduce emissions intensity of its GDP by 20-25% from 2005 levels by 2020, it is important for Indian States to adopt a low carbon growth path. The emissions of GHGs and other pollutants, if left to free market forces, are unlikely to be reduced on their own, thereby necessitating government intervention. Several States have adopted fiscal instruments to mobilize resources for promoting their low carbon growth plan. However, little is known about their operational mechanics and performance to date. I hope you will find the reports and the recommendations useful. If you have any questions or would like to discuss any aspects of the report, please feel free to contact Ms. Sunanda Rathi, Research Associate, Environment and Climate Change Group, Centre for Development Finance, IFMR LEAD at sunanda.rathi@ifmr.ac.in. Thanking you, With kind regards, Sabnam Gafoor Research Associate Environment and Climate Change Group Centre for Development Finance IFMR LEAD

IISD Reporting Services iisd-rs@iisd.org Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015  Subject: Climate Change Job Vacancies Update – 29 January 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice

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 Low Carbon Finance for the State of TamilNadu – Investments, Gaps and Barriers

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climate-l digest: January 27, 2015 From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015

Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Tuesday, January 27, 2015. 1. Icccr 2015 conference -October 5th -6th 2015 2. Oil price drop as a window of opportunity to act against fossil carbon emissions 3. World Bank Group blogs on networked carbon markets 4. CTCN Webinar on Waste Management and Climate Change If you are not worldviewmission@gmail.comand would like to join the climate-l Mailing List, please click here to SUBSCRIBE: – join-climate-l@lists.iisd.ca

G Poyyamoli <gpoyya9@gmail.com Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015  Subject: Icccr 2015 conference -October 5th -6th 2015

Dear Colleagues, I am happy to inform you that our Dept is organizing an “International Conference on Climate Change Resilience” during October 5th -6th 2015 in association with the Indian- European Multi-level Climate Governance Research Network (IECGN) at Pondicherry University. As a member of the  organizing committee , I request you to post the attached brochure /call letter/registration form   for submitting abstracts/papers for the conference. Wishing you  a very happy new year!

Thanking you, with regards Yours sincerely G.Poyyamoli PhD ( Member, CEM, IUCN & Member, SEAC, Govt of Puducherry)  Associate Professor &  Coordinator , Campus Sustainability Cell Department of Ecology& Environmental Sciences  Pondicherry University Puducherry India 605014 Ph (O) 091-0413-2654325  (R) 091-0413- 2257840 Cell: 091-9994458960 Fax: 91-0413-2655255/2655211 Alternative mail:gpoyya@gmail.com web site: www.pondiuni.edu.in/profile/dr-gpoyyamoli Bharadwaj V Kummamuru <bharadwaj.v.kummamuru@worldbioenergy.org   Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 Subject: Oil price drop as a window of opportunity to act against fossil carbon emissions Dear all, The decline of oil price offers the unique opportunity to introduce or increase the carbon taxes without burden to the end consumer. In this regard, World Bioenergy Association (WBA) and European Biomass Association (AEBIOM) sent out a letter to policy decision makers on the global level and to the media to seize this opportunity. You can access the letter by clicking here (http://bit.ly/1zacA0U). The Economist has a similar view in their recent article (http://econ.st/1G0XqkI). We invite you to forward this letter to policy makers in your regions as well. In case you have not answered the WBA questionnaire on the oil price drop and its effect on the renewables industry, you can still submit your answers before 30th January 2015. Access the questionnaire by clicking here (http://goo.gl/forms/ReecahNCEj). The results of the survey will be available shortly. Best regards Bharadwaj V Kummamuru Project Officer, World Bioenergy Association (WBA) Stockholm, Sweden From: Isabel Hagbrink <ihagbrink@worldbank.org    Wed, 28 Jan 2015  Subject: World Bank Group blogs on networked carbon markets
Dear Climate-L colleagues, Please take a look at our latest blog on networked carbon markets, which are being discussed at a conference this week in London hosted by the Climate Market Investors Association and ING: http://blogs.worldbank.org/climatechange/networking-climate-actions-stronger-international-carbon-market

WM Climate Carbon diggest info

Isabel Hagbrink Senior Communications Officer Climate and Carbon Finance Unit Climate Change Group T: 1-202-458 0422F: 1-202-522 7464 E: ihagbrink@worldbank.org Skype: isabel.hagbrink  @wbclimatechange www.worldbank.org/climate   1818 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20433 USA  From: Karina Larsen <karina.larsen@unep.org> Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 Subject: CTCN Webinar on Waste Management and Climate Change Dear Colleagues, On Wed, Feb 4, 2015 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM CET, the Climate Technology Centre & Network launches its first webinar training, entitled “Waste Management and Climate Change”. This webinar will address the impacts of climate change on the waste sector, as well as the potential contribution of the waste sector to mitigation efforts. Various technology options will be presented, highlighting the most common barriers faced by developing countries in utilizing these technologies and how public policies can help to overcome these barriers. The webinar is organized by CTCN Consortium Partner, Bariloche Foundation, and will be presented by Dr. Atilio Savino, President of ARS-Association for Solid Waste Studies,  and former President of International Solid Waste Association; Secretary of Sanitary Health Determinants-Ministry of Health of Argentina; and Secretary of Environment and Sustainable Development of Argentina-National Ministry of Health and Environment. The webinar is free of charge. To register, please visit: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6351803171458601218 With kind regards, Karina Larsen Knowledge and Communications Manager Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN) E:k.larsen@unido.org W:www.ctc-n.org

  ICCCRflyer final             ICCCRflyerfinal            Letter_Aebiom-WBA_19Jan

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Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015

Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Monday, January 26, 2015. 1. Climate Insurance for Dominican Dairy Producers; El Niño Odds Reduced; Drought in the Greater Horn 2. Call for papers: “Beyond Special Circumstances: Turkey and Global Climate Change Politics” / 16-17 April 2015 3. CALL FOR APPLICATIONS  |  ICAP Training Course on Emissions Trading in Seoul, South Korea |  19 to 28 May 2015 4. Climate Change Daily Feed – 27 January 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice 5. 2nd Africa Food Security & Adaptation Conference: Africa’s Soil the New Frontier: Re-imagining Africa Food Security Now and into the Future 30-31 July, 2015

Subject: Climate Insurance for Dominican Dairy Producers; El Niño Odds Reduced; Drought in the Greater Horn

Dear Climate-L readers,
Below are a few news items from the International Research Institute for Climate and Society you may find to be of interest. Please feel free to contact me for more information. Follow IRI on Twitter and on Facebook for more regular updates.
Thank you,
Francesco Fiondella
Sr. Communications Officer
International Research Institute for Climate and Society
(View the full newsletter in your browser and please sign up for our mailing list)
Designing Insurance with Dominican Dairy Producers
Over the last year, the financial instruments sector team at IRI has been working in the  Dominican Republic to design an index insurance product for the country’s dairy producers. This work has been part of the Climate Resiliency and Index Insurance Program, funded by the USAID office in the Dominican Republic. In a new video, we show how researchers and dairy producers worked together to design and test the insurance product in the spring of 2014. In the months that followed, the team worked to further refine the product, and now they are currently marketing it to dairy farmers in the Northwest region of the country. Learn more.
El Niño Odds Reduced
Based on the latest models, the chance of an El Niño developing during the current (January – March) season is around 63%, down from 76% last month. These odds for the current season are similar to those issued by the NOAA Climate Prediction Center/IRI forecast on January 8. Video recap and story here.
Fourth International Conference on Climate Services

ICCS 4 (#ICCS4) took place in Montevideo, Uruguay from December 10 through December 12. More than 180 participants from 31 countries attended the conference, which featured 100 speakers on topics such as data-driven climate services, innovative decision-support solutions, and ethics. The conference was hosted by the Uruguayan Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries, with support from the World Bank, the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security and a host of other local and international organizations. The conference is convened by the Climate Services Partnership, an informal network that works to advance the provision and delivery of climate services around the world. Visit the Climate Services Partnership website for the conference agenda, photos and blog updates.

   Ethemcan <ethemcanswy17@gmail.com> To:  Cc:  Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015
 Subject: Call for papers: “Beyond Special Circumstances: Turkey and Global Climate Change Politics” / 16-17 April 2015
The Istanbul Policy  Center-Sabanci University-Stiftung Mercator Initiative, Marmara  University Research Center for International Relations and Agence  Française de Développement would like to announce the Call for Papers for the “Young Scholars Workshop” on “Beyond Special Circumstances: Turkey and Global Climate Change Politics” which will take place on April 16-172015 at the Marmara University Sultanahmet Campus. In an attempt to go beyond the ‘special circumstances’ discourse and to  contribute to filling this knowledge gap, this Young Scholars Climate  Policy Workshop aims at providing a space of reflection on Turkey’s case within the global climate change regime as well as linking it to the broader issues. We seek a wide range of research foci, but potential topics and themes might include:
  •     Turkish climate change policy: Opportunities and challenges
  •     Foreign policy dimensions and UNFCCC
  •     Institutions and policy instruments in responding to climate change
  •     Impacts, vulnerabilities and adaptation in key sectors
  •     Gender and climate change response
  •     Energy and mitigation opportunities for Turkey
  •     Local governance of climate change
  •     Private sector and climate change
  •     Ecological conflicts and climate change
  •     Social movements and climate change
  •     Climate change narratives and the media
  •     Climate finance

We particularly encourage graduate students (M.A., M.Sc. and PhD students) and junior scholars as well as senior scholars, practitioners from NGOs and  state institutions to present their work. Contributions to this workshop will be considered for publication in an edited volume or a special  issue in a high-quality peer-reviewed journal. Submissions in English and Turkish are welcome. Abstracts around 300 words are invited for the first round on 22.02.2015. Extended abstracts around 800-1000 (max.) words will be requested for accepted submissions by 01.04.2015Abstracts (and any inquiries) should be sent to: bsc2015@sabanciuniv.eduPlease see the link for details. http://ipc.sabanciuniv.edu/en/new/call-for-papers-young-scholars-climate-policy-workshop/ 

 ICAP Training Course <trainingcourse@icapcarbonaction.com> To:  Cc:  Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015
 Subject: CALL FOR APPLICATIONS  |  ICAP Training Course on Emissions Trading in Seoul, South Korea |  19 to 28 May 2015
    Dear Climate-L readers, The International Carbon Action Partnership (ICAP) will convene its    13thTraining Course on Emissions Trading for Emerging Economies      and Developing Countries in Seoul, South Korea, from 19 to 28 May      2015. The course will focus on key issues faced in the design and    implementation of ETS, taking into account the specific needs and    interests of developing countries.Applicants should be stakeholders from the nongovernmental,      academic and private sectors as well as policy makers who are or      will be involved in deciding on, designing and implementing      emissions trading systems. The ICAP Training Course is open to applicants from China,      India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Republic of Korea, Russian      Federation, Taiwan, Thailand, Ukraine and Vietnam.     Nationals of the Republic of Korea and Taiwan may apply but will be    expected to cover their own costs for travel and accommodation as    they are not eligible to receive ODA (see DAC list of ODA    recipients). The same applies to nationals of Australia, Canada,    EU-28, Iceland, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland and the US,    who are permanent residents in one of the countries listed above. Application deadline is 15 February at midnight (Central      European Time). The course will be conducted in English. Applications are to be    submitted in English. Detailed application instructions are available attached and on the    ICAP website at https://icapcarbonaction.com/activities/icap-courses. Applications must be submitted via the online application form at: https://ec.europa.eu/clima/policies/ets/ets-summer-university/community/survey/icap-training-course-seoul-south-korea-19-28-may-2015-application-formKind regards,
The ICAP Training Course Team
International Carbon Action Partnership (ICAP)           ICAP brings together regional, national and sub-national          governments and public authorities to discuss important issues          in the design of emissions trading schemes (ETS) and the way          forward to a global carbon market. Through knowledge and          experience sharing, ICAP helps policy makers recognize design          compatibility issues and opportunities at an early stage. It          thereby facilitates possible future linking of trading          programs. Founded in 2007, ICAP now has 30 members and 4          observers from Europe, North America and the Asia-Pacific          region.  For more information on the status of cap-and-trade          worldwide, visit the ICAP Interactive ETS Map          (https://icapcarbonaction.com/ets-map?view=etsmap). The ICAP Training Courses and Summer Schools have been          implemented since 2009 by the Ecologic Institute and          Development Solutions.Ecologic Institut gemeinnützige GmbH       Pfalzburger Str. 43/44, D-10717 Berlin       Geschäftsführerin / Director: Dr. Camilla Bausch       Sitz der Gesellschaft / Registered Office: Berlin (Germany)       Registergericht / Court of Registration: Amtsgericht Berlin      (Charlottenburg), HRB 57947

IISD Reporting Services <iisd-rs@iisd.org Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 Subject: Climate Change Daily Feed – 27 January 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice

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”Richard T. Munang” <m.tingem@googlemail.com

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015   Subject: 2nd Africa Food Security & Adaptation Conference: Africa’s Soil the New Frontier: Re-imagining Africa Food Security Now and into the Future 30-31 July, 2015

Dear Colleague,
The 2nd  Africa Food Security and Adaptation conference (AFSAC2)  is slated to take place on July 30-31, 2015 with theme: Africa’s Soil the New Frontier: Re-imagining Africa Food Security Now and into the Future Under a Changing Climate.
The key objectives of the conference are:
• To identify scalable and inclusive business models for EBA driven agriculture  that can create opportunities in the entire agricultural value chain
• To identify scalable  innovative financing models  for EBA driven agriculture that when implemented could stimulate  growth, job creation and value chain partnership in Africa
• To understand the  benefits of EBA for job creation and the achievement of the proposed SDGs and what Africa will lose as a continent if EbA is ignored or given little support;
• To identify enabling policies and legislation that will incentivize countries to invest in agriculture, soil conservation and EbA;
• To discuss what needs to be done to incentivize private sector involvement in EBA-driven agriculture to bring in capital and enhance competitiveness.
 AFSAC2 outcomes will help in accelerating the implementation of the Malabo declaration on agriculture and  food security as well as contribute  to the Agenda 2063.
The purpose of this letter is to invite you to participate and contribute  during the conference
Visit the website to register for the conference www.afsac2.aaknet.org
-
Best regards
——-
Richard Munang, PhD ● Africa Regional Climate Change  Coordinator● Regional Office for Africa (ROA)- United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) ●
www.unep.org ● www.aaknet.orgwww.foodsec.aaknet.org●Twitter: @mtingem

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Subject: climate-l digest: January 20, 2015 From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015

Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Tuesday, January 20, 2015. 1. Webinar LEDS LAC: Conocimiento para el uso financiamiento climático internacional/Climate finance knowledge 2. Climate Strategies & The Stanley Foundation INVITATION & CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Global Climate Policy Conference 2015 3. NorCaP Facility Announces Results of First Call for Proposals 4. XIV World Forestry Congress – last call for abstracts 5. Climate Change Daily Feed – 21 January 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice 6. Climate Change Job Vacancies Update – 21 January 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice 7. U.S. Department of Transportation – Invitation to Rollout of Climate and Extreme Weather Risk Management Tools 8. Celebrating climate action: Apply for a 2015 Momentum for Change Award! 9. Eye on Climate Change. Second Call for Data Visualizations on Climate Change – COP20

Alejandra Granados alejandra.granados@consultor.incae.edu  To:  Cc:  Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 20:18 Subject: Webinar LEDS LAC: Conocimiento para el uso financiamiento climático internacional/Climate finance knowledge

      Webinar: Financiamiento climático internacional      View this email in your browser

Fecha: jueves 22 de enero del 2015 Hora: 9:00-11:00  (GMT-6) Revise el cambio de zona horaria de acuerdo con su ubicación: http://bit.ly/14WlVzj

Date: Thursday, January 22, 2015 Time: 9:00-11:00  (GMT-6) Check the change of time zone according to your location:http://bit.ly/14WlVzj

Climate Strategies Info@climatestrategies.org  To:  Cc:  Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 Subject: Climate Strategies & The Stanley Foundation INVITATION & CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Global Climate Policy Conference 2015 

Invitation AND CALL FOR ABSTRACTS 

Global Climate Policy Conference 2015 

RESEARCH-POLICY INTERFACE: REMOVING ROADBLOCKS, EXPLORING IDEAS 

New Delhi, 30th April and 1st May 2015

Climate Strategies and The Stanley Foundation (TSF) have pleasure in inviting you to take part in the second Global Climate Policy Conference (GCPC) that will be held in New Delhi, India on Thursday and Friday, 30th April and 1st May 2015. The GCPC 2015 is part of a wider engagement process “Global Research-Policy Interface Climate 2015. Strengthening the Research-Policy interface in the international climate negotiations” with the following goals:

  • ·         Identifying key questions behind the most likely roadblocks for the Paris COP;
  • ·         Collecting, developing and communicating analysis of the main realistic options for answers;
  • ·         Creating an “Exploratorium” for new ideas that could help with negotiations;
  • ·         Defining the issues and what analysis tells us, in a clear final document for negotiators and stakeholders

The conference will bring together researchers and analysts from academia and think-tanks, together with negotiators and other practitioners and focus on:

  • ·         Exploring new economic, social and political ideas that could help with negotiations;
  • ·         Analysing concrete options to remove obstacles on the way to Paris.

Similarly to the year before the focus of the agenda will be informed by submissions and contributions. The output of the conference will be subsequently brought to the Business and Climate Summit in May 2015 and the Paris Scientific Conference Our Common Future under Climate Change in July 2015. Finally in the fall 2015 we will publish the “Analyst’s Guide to the Paris COP”. The Global Interface Programme Committee will select four to six topics meeting the Project goals to be presented at GCPC2015 on the first day of the conference. With this email we would like to invite and encourage you to: - participate in the conference (please fill in the attached form); – submit a topic you would like to present at the conference (short, one page description suffices at this stage); – forward this invite to researchers who are studying new, exciting topics. Please submit your topics by the 9th of March, by emailing: eleonora.arcese@climatestrategies.org We intend to confirm the participants and speakers of the conference by mid-March 2015. Please note that there is travel support available for presenters– subject to individual arrangements. We look forward to your input! Best regards, Andrzej Błachowicz                                                                                Todd J. Edwards Managing Director                                                                                 Program Officer – Climate Change Climate Strategies                                                                                 The Stanley Foundation andrzej.blachowicz@climatestrategies.org                                              tedwards@stanleyfoundation.org Ash.Sharma@nefco.fi> To:  Cc:  Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 14:57:22 +0000 Subject: NorCaP Facility Announces Results of First Call for Proposals

Dear colleagues, The first call for proposals for CDM projects under the NEFCO Norwegian Carbon Procurement Facility (NorCaP) closed in January 2014. A total of 18.86 million CERs have been contracted from 10 projects. The second Call for Proposals was launched in September 2014 and closed for submissions in December. The NorCaP was established by the Norwegian Government in September 2013, with Nordic Environment Finance Corporation (NEFCO) as the Facility Manager. The principal objective of NorCaP is to prevent the reversal of emission reduction activities by procuring credits from projects whose survival or continued emission reductions depend on a higher carbon price than achievable under current market conditions (“vulnerable projects”). The full list of projects is available at http://www.nefco.org/news/results_of_first_call_for_proposals_under_norcap Aggregate information on the second Call for Proposals will be made available shortly. Best regards Ash Sharma Special Adviser for Climate Change Nordic Environment Finance Corporation (NEFCO) Fabianinkatu, 34 FI 00171 Helsinki FINLAND Direct +358 40 08 11 327 Fax +358 96 30 976 ash.sharma@nefco.fi   www.nefco.org/cff The information in this message and / or attachments is intended solely for the attention and use of the named addressee(s) and may be confidential. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this transmittal in error and that any use of it is prohibited. In such a case please delete this message and notify the Nordic Environment Finance Corporation (NEFCO) accordingly. E-mails are susceptible to alteration. NEFCO shall not be liable for the message if altered, changed or falsified. WFC-XIV WFC-XIV@fao.org Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:20:50 +0100 Subject: XIV World Forestry Congress – last call for abstracts

Spanish * * French

Reminder – last call for abstracts Don’t miss the fast approaching deadline - Friday 30 January 2015 - to submit your abstract for papers, posters and videos. The XIV World Forestry Congress will take place 7-11 September 2015 in Durban, South Africa and will be a key occasion for the world’s foresters and forest supporters to gather, to share their expertise and experience, and to project a new vision for the future of forests and forestry. We welcome abstracts for papers, posters and – for the first time – video presentations on the central theme of the Congress, “Forests and People: Investing in a Sustainable Future”, and on relevant topics that also align with any of the six Congress sub-themes. We look forward to receiving your submissions and hope to see you in Durban! Full call for abstracts | Submission guidance Key dates to remember

30 January 2015 Deadline for submission of abstracts
15 February 2015 Authors will receive evaluation of their abstracts and full instructions on how to submit the paper, poster or video
15 April 2015 Deadline for submission of posters, papers and videos
15 June 2015 Selected authors will receive notification to prepare a presentation at the Congress

Spread the word Please forward this announcement to anyone you know who might like to learn more about the XIV World Forestry Congress, and help spread the word on social media with the #WFC2015 hashtag. Preliminary information about the Congress can be found on the FAO XIV World Forestry Congress website.

Hester Obisi Secretary-General of the XIV World Forestry Congress Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries South Africa Tiina Vahanen  Associate Secretary-General of the XIV World Forestry Congress Forestry Department, FAO, Italy

Contact WFC-Abstracts@fao.org

Recordatorio – última convocatoria para envío de resúmenes

No se pierda la fecha límite – viernes 30 de enero de 2015 – para enviar su resumen  de artículos, pósteres y vídeos. El XIV Congreso Forestal Mundial se llevará a cabo del 7 al 11 de septiembre de 2015 en Durban, República de Sudáfrica y será una ocasión fundamental para que los forestales de todo el mundo y las personas que apoyan actividades relacionadas a los bosques se reúnan, compartan conocimientos y experiencias y proyecten una nueva visión sobre el futuro de los bosques y las actividades forestales. Invitamos a la presentación de resúmenes de ponencias, posters y, por primera vez, presentaciones en vídeo sobre el tema central del Congreso, “Los Bosques y la Gente: Invertir en un Futuro Sostenible”, y sobre temas relevantes relacionados con cualquiera de los seis subtemas del Congreso. ¡Esperamos recibir sus resúmenes y ojalá nos encontremos en Durban! Llamado para presentar resúmenes | Directrices Fechas importantes que es preciso recordar

30 de enero de 2015: Plazo para la presentación de los resúmenes
15 de febrero de 2015 Los autores recibirán una evaluación de sus resúmenes e instrucciones completas para la presentación de un trabajo, cartel o vídeo
15 de abril de 2015: Plazo para la presentación de los trabajos, carteles, y vídeos
15 de junio de 2015: Los autores seleccionados recibirán una notificación invitándolos a preparar una exposición para el Congreso

Difunda el mensaje Por favor, haga llegar este anuncio a toda persona que usted conozca y que desee saber más acerca del XIV Congreso Forestal Mundial, y ayúdenos a difundir el mensaje a través de los medios sociales con el hashtag #WFC2015. Información preliminar acerca del Congreso se puede encontrar en el sitio web de la FAO dedicado al XIV Congreso Forestal Mundial.

Hester Obisi Secretario General del XIV congreso Forestal Mundial Departamento de Agricultura, Bosques y Pesca Sudáfrica Tiina Vahanen Secretario General Adjunto XIV Congreso Forestal Mundial Departamento Forestal, FAO, Italia

Contacto WFC-Abstracts@fao.org


Spanish * * English

Dernier appel pour les  résumés

La date limite du Vendredi 30 Janvier 2015 approche à grands pas, ne manquez pas d’envoyer vos résumés d’articles, affiches et vidéos. Le XIVe Congrès forestier mondial aura lieu 7-11 Septembre 2015 Durban, Afrique du Sud et sera une occasion clé pour les forestiers et les partisans des forêts du monde entier, de partager leur expertise et leur expérience, et de projeter une nouvelle vision pour l’avenir des forêts et de la foresterie. Nous vous invitons à soumettre des résumés présentant des articles, des affiches et – pour la première fois – des présentations de vidéos autour du thème central «Les forêts et les populations: investir dans un avenir durable»,  et  sur des sujets pertinents qui cadrent également avec l’un des six sous-thèmes du Congrès. Nous espérons recevoir votre résumé et vous rencontrer à Durban. Appel à communication | Lignes directrices Dates clés á retenir

30 janvier 2015: Date limite pour soumission des résumés
15 février 2015: Les auteurs recevront une évaluation de leurs résumés et des instructions complètes pour la présentation des articles, affiches ou vidéos
15 avril 2015: Date limite pour la soumission des articles, affiches et vidéos
15 juin 2015: Les auteurs sélectionnés recevront une notification les invitant à préparer une présentation pour le Congrès

Passez le message Veuillez faire circuler cette annonce à vos connaissances qui aimeraient avoir plus d’information  sur le XIVe Congrès Forestier Mondial et aider à passer le mot sur les médias sociaux avec le hashtag # WFC2015. Les informations préliminaires sur le Congrès peuvent être consultées directement sur le site du XIVe Congrès Forestier Mondial.

Hester Obisi Secrétaire générale du XIVe Congrès forestier mondial Département de l’agriculture, des forêts et des pêches Afrique du Sud Tiina Vahanen  Secrétaire générale associée du XIVe Congrès forestier mondial  Département des forêts

Contact WFC-Abstracts@fao.org

From: IISD Reporting Services iisd-rs@iisd.org Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 Subject: Climate Change Daily Feed – 21 January 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice

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Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015

Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Monday, January 19, 2015. 1. Holy See Delegation to COP20 Lima 2. Climate Change Daily Feed – 20 January 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice 3. weADAPT: Adaptation without Borders – Special Feature

Tue, 20 Jan 2015 13:48:35 +0100 Subject: Holy See Delegation to COP20 Lima

Ladies and Gentlemen,
Dear colleagues,
On behalf of the Holy See delegation to COP20 in Lima, I have the pleasure to inform you that you can find the Holy See statement to the High-Level segment of COP 20 at:
It refers to the message of Pope Francis, highlighting that the climate debate “affects all humanity, especially the poor and future generations” and that “it is a serious ethical and moral responsibility (…) to act together.”  The full message of Pope Francis can be found at:
Kind regards,
Yours sincerely
Marcus Wandinger
   IISD Reporting Services <iisd-rs@iisd.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 12:30:36 -0600 Subject: Climate Change Daily Feed – 20 January 2015 – Climate Change Policy & Practice
Having trouble viewing this email? Please try our Browser Version

Sukaina Bharwani sukaina.bharwani@sei-international.org Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015  Subject: weADAPT: Adaptation without Borders – Special Feature

New climate change adaptation articles on weADAPT
Is this email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser.
Dr. Sukaina Bharwani | Senior Research Fellow | Stockholm Environment Institute
29 Grove Street, OXFORD, OX2 7JT, UK
T: +44 1865 355605 | Skype: sukaina_b | Twitter: @weADAPT1
QuickShare your climate adaptation projects with the weADAPT CommunityCheck out the latest content in weADAPT’s Newsletter
Find weADAPT on: Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter | Google+

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Subject: climate-l digest: January 14, 2015

From: “Climate Change Info Mailing List digest” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Reply-To: “Climate Change Info Mailing List” <climate-l@lists.iisd.ca> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015

Having trouble viewing this digest email? Please visit our “climate-l” forum to read all messages: https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l CLIMATE-L Digest for Wednesday, January 14, 2015. 1. Application period open to the Master’s degree program in Environmental Policy and Law (University of Eastern Finland) 2. Newsletter: “5 reasons why low oil prices are good for the environment” by Assaad W. Razzouk via The Independent. 3. EAERE-FEEM-VIU Summer School 2015 – Deadline for applications: Feburary 1st, 2015 4. Second European Climate Change Adapation conference (ECCA2015) 5. The latest from Gold Standard: Agriculture launch, cities consultation, COP perspectives and more… 6. Update on IDDRI’s activities on COP21 7. The 2015 January 1st updates of the UNEP DTU CDM, PoA, JI, NAMA Pipelines are now available 8. Two New WWF Reports on Climate Change and Water Security in Central Asia 9. ICAP Quarterly – Global Trends in Emissions Trading 10. Energy Low-Emissions Development Strategies: Africa (with Experiences from Cape Verde and Kenya) 11. RFF webcast: How Will Climate Change Affect Our Global Food Supply?

Thu, 15 Jan 2015 09:28:21 +0000 Subject: Application period open to the Master’s degree program in Environmental Policy and Law (University of Eastern Finland)

​​Environment, Natural Resources & Climate Change:

Master’s Degree Program in Environmental Policy and Law We are now accepting applications for the Master’s Degree Program in Environmental Policy and Law. This is a multidisciplinary two-year program taught in English at the University of Eastern Finland. The program combines group teaching and independent research with the objective of providing participants with professional skills in environmental law and policy. Participants may choose between two alternative majors: a) Natural Resources Governance or b) Environmental and Climate Change LawCourses offered include: §  Climate Change Law and Policy §  Environmental and Social Impact Assessment §  Public Relations and Conflict Mediation in Natural Resources Management §  Mining, Environment and Society §  International Environmental Law §  EU Environmental Law §  WTO: Clean Energy, Environment and Natural Resources §  International Energy Law and Policy §  EU Energy Law and Policy §  Climate Law and Carbon Markets §  Food and Society Our teachers include: Prof. Rauno Sairinen, Prof. Kati Kulovesi, Prof. Kim Talus, Prof. Tuomas Kuokkanen, Prof. Juha Kotilainen, Prof. Maria Åkerman, Dr Irmeli Mustalahti, Dr Yulia Yamineva, Karl Upston-Hooper, Seita Romppanen, Eugenia Recio and Niko Soininen. Study & application essentials

  •  No tuition fees are charged for degree studies, regardless of citizenship
  •  Two-year Master’s degree program (120 ECTS) with interactive study methods
  •  Two alternative majors: environmental policy or environmental law
  •  Minimum admission criteria: Appropriate Bachelor’s degree or equivalent university degree and proof of English language proficiency
  •  Application period: 7 January – 18 February 2015

More information, detailed admission criteria and information on available courses are available online at: http://www.uef.fi/envlawandpolicy​ LYY The Master’s Degree Program benefits from the research and education networks of the Institute for Natural Resources, Environment and Society (LYY) (www.uef.fi/lyy). The LYY Institute is a network organization operating at the University of Eastern Finland. The Institute combines expertise from social and cultural research and applies it to the analysis of natural resource use and the environment. The LYY has made the Joensuu Campus one of Finland’s leading places for social-scientific environmental research, focusing especially on issues of natural resource governance and policies of sustainable development. CCEEL The Master’s Degree Program also benefits from the UEF Centre for Climate, Energy and Environmental Law (CCEEL), involving 4 professors and more than 20 researchers specializing in climate, energy and environmental law (http://www.uef.fi/en/cceel/centre-for-climate-change-energy-and-environmental-law) For more information, contact: envirolawpol (at) uef.fi University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu Campus, Department of Law PO. Box 111, FIN-80101 JOENSUU, FINLAND Feel free to circulate this information! ​Sindicatum Sustainable Resources <web@team-sindicatum.net> To:  Cc:  Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 13:28:45 +0800 Subject: Newsletter: “5 reasons why low oil prices are good for the environment” by Assaad W. Razzouk via The Independent.

 January 15, 2015Dear Climate-L,Apologies for any cross posting.Read our latest thought leadership article – “5 reasons why low oil prices are good for the environment”. Assaad W. Razzouk’s Op-Ed via The Independent
READ OUR THOUGHT LEADERSHIP ARTICLES:

The UN climate talks just failed – now for the real battle, by Assaad W Razzouk.  Published by The Ecologist. ”What Might Carbon Markets Post 2020 Look Like”, by Gareth Brydon Phillips in Lima.  “If you’re worried about immigration, then you should be terrified about climate change”, Assaad W Razzouk. Published by UK’s The Independent. “Clean Energy in Indonesia: A Massive Opportunity Which Must Be Seized by its New Leadership” by Dr Jay Mariyappan.“We can win on climate change – but without the UN”, Assaad W RazzoukPublished by The Ecologist. “Climate change and Lebanon: the elephant in the room”, Assaad W RazzoukPublished by The Daily Star, Lebanon’s leading English language newspaper. “Where’s the money?” Assaad W Razzouk on how to finance the transition to a green economyAssaad W Razzouk, published by UNIDO’s Making It magazine. “It’s Time For Leaders to Lead and Propagate the Facts: Climate Action Promotes Prosperity”. Assaad W Razzouk’s Op-Ed via The Independent The EU elections “earthquake” is good for climate action by Assaad W Razzouk, Eco-Business. A barrage of lawsuits is needed to curb climate change, The fourth in a series on reviving and reinventing the global climate movement by Assaad W Razzouk, The Independent. A tale of two Thai landfills, Dr. Jay Mariyappan on designing effective clean energy projects. How to slow climate change? Target the 90 companies who pollute the most. The third in a series on reviving and reinventing the global climate movement by Assaad W Razzouk, The Independent. What the climate movement must learn from the fight against AIDS. The second in a series by Assaad W Razzouk on reviving and reinventing the global climate movement. Warm, too warm, and warmer still: The climate movement must face up to its colossal failure, by Assaad W Razzouk, The Independent. The first in a series on reviving and reinventing the global climate movement. Sindicatum Sustainable Resources www.sindicatum.com Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei <events.ve@feem.it  Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015  Subject: EAERE-FEEM-VIU Summer School 2015 – Deadline for applications: Feburary 1st, 2015

hasa@dmu.dk     Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 Subject: Second European Climate Change Adapation conference (ECCA2015) Dear Colleagues, The first call for abstracts to the ECCA2015 conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, May 12-14, sponsored by the European Union is open. The deadline is February 1st. Please find here the link to the recent newsletter:http://austdce.cmail1.com/t/ViewEmail/j/4DB5FDE7F39567DD/2648A75E76198800C06B463AA70A4F2C. Sincerely, – Hans Sanderson Claire Willers <claire.willers@goldstandard.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 13:32:18 +0100 Subject: The latest from Gold Standard: Agriculture launch, cities consultation, COP perspectives and more…

Dear Climate-L
Please find attached a link to our latest updates: Gold Standard news and announcements
Highlights include:
  • Marion Verles joining Gold Standard as new CEO
  • Gold Standard Agriculture Requirements recently launched
  • Public consultation for our Sustainable Cities Programme ends 6th February
  • Our point of view on COP20
  • Water Benefit Standard: Propose your project
  • New programme commitments: Two initiatives that will amplify the impact of cookstove projects globally
  • Project spotlight – improving livelihoods in Rwanda, empowering women in Burkina Faso and saving more than 1 million tonnes of CO2
  • From-the-field account of Gold Standard cookstove project, Proyecto Mirador
  • Sustainable style – the first carbon neutral wedding in China
We hope you enjoy the read and if you require any additional information, please do not hesitate to contact us.
All the best
The Gold Standard Team
Geneva, Switzerland Tel +41 22 7887080 Email: info@goldstandard.org www.goldstandard.org Follow us on Twitter @cdmgoldstandard Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheGoldStandardFoundation

———- Doorgestuurd bericht ———- From: Thomas SPENCER <thomas.spencer@iddri.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 15:07:53 +0100 Subject: Update on IDDRI’s activities on COP21

Dear Colleagues,
On behalf of the whole IDDRI team, I would like to draw your attention to recent work by IDDRI in the context of the preparations for COP21
I hope you find them useful.
Best regards,
Thomas
IDDRI’s Issue Series: A Perspective from Latin American and Caribbean Think Tanks on Climate Change
IDDRI published a series of papers from Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) think tanks in the run up to Lima. These focus on bringing the perpsective of this region to the international policy debate on climate change. They provide perspectives on the transition to a low-carbon economy, on climate finance, on agriculture in international cooperation, and on how to involve the private sector in international cooperation on climate change.
You can find links to this series here:
A Comprehensive Assessment of Options for the Legal Form of the Paris Climate Agreement
IDDRI published a paper exploring options for the legal form of the Paris agreement. In particular it explores the links between the form of the core agreement, options for anchoring INDCs, and the issues of transparency and compliance.
Program Director Energy and Climate 
Recent IDDRI publications on energy and climate:
A Comprehensive Assessment for Options for the Legal Form of the Paris Climate Agreement
A Perspective from Latin American and Caribbean Think Tanks on Climate Change: Issues Series

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Tous les courriers électroniques émis depuis la messagerie de Sciences Po doivent respecter les conditions d’usage.
Pour les consulter rendez-vous sur :

———- Doorgestuurd bericht ———- From: Joergen Fenhann <jqfe@dtu.dk> To:  Cc:  Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 09:13:47 -0600 Subject: The 2015 January 1st updates of the UNEP DTU CDM, PoA, JI, NAMA Pipelines are now available Dear Climate-L reader                          1. January 2015 UNEP Risoe has changed name to UNEP DTU Partnership. This is because we have left the peninsular Risoe and moved into the UN-City in Copenhagen, and because we are still part of the Danish Technical University DTU. The CDM/JI Pipeline Analysis and Database of the CDM & JI projects has been updated atwww.cdmpipeline.org and the NAMAPipeline on www.namapipeline.org CDM news: In December 5 new CDM projects were submitted, all from Mexico (4 Coal bed/mine methane projects and landfill gas project). 10 CDM projects got their registration action in December, bringing the total number of registered CDM project up to 7589, or 88% of the 8636 of the CDM projects that are alive. Only 1039 projects are still at validation and 8 have requested registration. For 1956 CDM projects the DOEs terminated validation, and for 267 the DOEs gave a negative validation. 271 projects were rejected by the EB, and 62 projects were withdrawn. December had a monthly issuance of 8.6 MCERs. The total issuance is now 1521 MCERs.  The average issuance success is 89.1%. 2715 Registered projects have now got issuance; this is an increase of 20 compared to last month. According to the “Annual compilation and accounting report for Annex B Parties under the Kyoto Protocol for 2013″ FCCC/KP/CMP/2013/6 the total Voluntary Cancellation until the end of 2012 was 4.9 MCERS, and it could easily be the double now. Since the Voluntary Cancelations in the central registry is now 1.7 MCERs, the Voluntary cancelation in the national registries must be around 10 MCERs. However, it is secret how much was canceled for which projects in the national registries. In the “Analysis” sheet called “Host country use”. In this column you can see the 232 Chinese CDM projects that have applied to be registered in the domestic pilot compliance market (they are marked with the text “CCER val.”). In addition 51 CDM projects have got CCERs verified (they are marked with the text “CCER ver.”). In the 4 columns in the far right-hand side of the “CDM_Project” sheet we show the amount of verified CCERs and the monitored period for these projects. In total 507 projects have been submitted to the Chinese domestic pilot compliance market until now. PoA news: Four new PoAs were submitted in December: “Scaling-Up Solar Photovoltaic Power Generation Across Africa and the Levant Region.”; “Lurio Forest Landscape PoA” in Mozambique; “Ethiopia – Clean Cooking Energy Program”; and “Ethiopia Off-Grid Renewable Energy Program”. Subtracting the 43 PoAs that the DOEs terminated validation of, the 3 PoAs rejected by the EB, the 3 PoAs withdrawn, and the 22 resubmitted PoAs we now have 398 PoAs in the Pipeline: 120 at validation, 2 have requested registration, and 276 are registered. 17 new CPAs were submitted in December for: “The programme to promote efficient lightings in local areas” in South Korea got 5 CPAs, “Tunki Small Scale Hydropower Program of Activities” in Peru got 2 CPAs, “PoA for the Reduction of emission from non-renewable fuel from cooking at household level” in got 1 CPA from Somalia and 1 from South Africa, “Promotion of renewable energy generation in India- Programme of Activities” got 2 CPAs, “Improved Cookstoves Program for Malawi and cross-border regions of Mozambique” got 2 CPAs in Malawi, “Improved Cook Stove Programme with Carbon Finance (ICF), Nepal” got 2 CPAs, “TUCANO CDM Programme of Activities for the Promotion of Small Hydropower Plants in Brazil” got 1 CPA, and “African Improved Cooking Stoves Programme of Activities” in Ghana got 1 CPA. We welcome Somalia in the Pipelines with their first CPA. In total 1883 CPAs exist hosted by 65 countries. The total issuance from the 17 PoAs with issuance is now 2.4 MCERs. JI news: No new JI projects were submitted in December. According to the Ukrainian web-site www.carbonunitsregistry.gov.ua/en/258.htm two JI track1 projects from Ukraine had issuances. These issuance have not yet been reported to the UNFCCC. ITL UA1000548 got 6.773 MERUs, and UA1000549 got 6.878 MERUs. The total issuance of ERUs therefore increased to 863.5 MERUs. NAMApipeline news: see www.namapipeline.org The UNFCCC NAMA Registry can be accessed by the public at the webpage: www4.unfccc.int/sites/nama 19 new NAMAs were submitted in December: One NAMA was submitted by Ethiopia: “Ethiopia Railway’s ­ Addis Ababa Light Rail Transit (LRT) Transit Oriented Development (TOD) NAMA”. Two NAMAs were submitted by Costa Rica: “Low Carbon Coffee – Costa Rica” “Costa Rica Livestock NAMA”. Six NAMAs were submitted by Uganda: “Reduction, Recycling and Reuse of Solid Waste in Kampala City”; “The Promotion of the Use of Efficient Institutional Stoves in Institutions”; “Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) for Kampala”; “Developing appropriate strategies and techniques to reduce methane emissions from livestock production in Uganda”; “Integrated Wastewater Treatment for Agro-process Water in Uganda”; “Periodic Vehicle Inspection for Emissions and Roadworthiness”. Ten new NAMAs were submitted by Mexico: “Efficient Cookstoves”; “Solar Water Heaters”; “Cogeneration in Mexico”; “Car Fleet Renewal in Mexico”; “Disposal and Use of Wastes and Solid and Biomass Residues”; “Fuel Switch in the industry”; “Fuel Switch for the Power Generation; “Renewable Energies and Energy Efficiency in the Private Sector”; “NAMA for Sustainable Housing Retrofit”; “Low Emission Schools”. This information is used as input to our NAMAPipeline, which now contains 90 NAMAs (including 1 NAMA that was withdrawn) and 14 support programmes. We had changed the table in the “Analysis” sheet showing number of submitted NAMAs per country. It now contains a column showing the total support requested (financial+technical+capacity building) and a column showing the total cost (total requested support+other local+other international support). The total support offered is now 73 MUS$, the total support requested is 6920 MUS$, and the total cost for the NAMAs is 14080 MUS$. PledgePipeline news: The UNEP Emission Gap Report 2014 was published 19. December, see http://www.unep.org/publications/ebooks/emissionsgapreport2014/ This 2014 Gap report also includes calculations of the 2030 GHG emission gap. UNEP Risoe is one of the teams that delivered emission data to this report. We regularly update our Pledgepipeline on the web-site:www.unep.org/climatechange/pledgepipeline Our Pledgepipeline has now been enlarged with columns for 2025, 2030, and 2040 in order to make it ready to accommodate the INDCs. Joergen Fenhann, Rasmus Saldern Antonsen and Thor Nyborg Bendsen UNEP DTU (formerly known as UNEP Risoe) Danish Technical University UN City in Copenhagen, Denmark Phone:(+45) 40 20 27 89 jqfe@dtu.dk ———- Doorgestuurd bericht ———- From: Ryan Bartlett <ryan.bartlett@wwfus.org> To:  Cc:  Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 09:22:49 -0600 Subject: Two New WWF Reports on Climate Change and Water Security in Central Asia WWF has just published two reports, with funding from USAID, analyzing climate vulnerability and water security across the 12 countries of the Snow Leopard range in Central Asia. The first report, “Guardians of the Headwaters: Snow Leopards, Water Provision, and Climate Vulnerability,” is a series of maps that provides new insight into the downstream water provision benefits provided to human populations by the high altitude areas of the Snow leopard range, and how they are threatened by increasing temperatures and other climate change. Covering 12 countries, the range forms the headwaters of 20 major river basins which flow to 22 countries. The second report, “Climate Vulnerability in Asia’s High Mountains: How climate change affects communities and ecosystems in Asia’s water towers,” outlines the most recent science on the impacts of climate change across the major mountain ranges of Central Asia. It outlines how communities and ecosystems are vulnerable to changes throughout the region, from increased frequency and intensity of extreme weather to shifts in rainfall seasonality and increasing rates of glacial melt. Lastly, it summarizes existing efforts to adapt to these changes and provides recommendations for future adaptation efforts, including addressing key research needs moving forward. Both reports can be downloaded here: http://www.worldwildlife.org/projects/conserving-snow-leopards-securing-water-resources-and-benefiting-communities From: ICAP secretariat info@icapcarbonaction.com Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 Subject: ICAP Quarterly – Global Trends in Emissions Trading

ICAP Quarterly – Global Trends in Emissions Trading

Issue: 4  Thursday, 15 January 2015

 https://icapcarbonaction.com/index.php?option=com_jnews&act=mailing&task=view&mailingid=11

Flyer for LEDS Africa Webinar

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UNEP:  Open-Free MOOC  “Pathways to Climate Change Adaptation:  the Case of Small Island Developing States [SIDS]“

Dear colleagues,
UNEP in collaboration with the University of Geneva and the National Adaptation Planning Global Support Programme, is opening a new Massive On-line Open Course (MOOC) on “Pathways to climate change adaptation: the case of Small Island Developing States”.
This on-line course is free and open to everybody. No specific requirements are needed. It starts on 26 January 2015.
 This 5-week course (about 4 hours per week) provides a thorough introduction to the issues surrounding climate change adaptation using a case-study approach.
International experts from academia, international and non-governmental organizations will help you answer questions such as “Why is adaptation to climate change necessary? Why are small islands particularly vulnerable to climate change? How can we analyse climate risks? How can adaptation contribute to sustainable development goals? How can Ecosystems Based Approaches be used? ”
More details, trailer and link to sign up for the course at the following URL: https://www.coursera.org/course/sids
Please disseminate this information to your relevant contacts interested in climate change adaptation and/or SIDS.
Best regards,
Arthur

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Preparing Society for Climate Change

Dear Delegation, FYI… our draft policy briefing. The UN Sustainable Development Education Caucus has appreciated the support of Peru to move the environmental education and sustainability agenda forward.  To update you and your colleagues, here is a copy of our briefing for your delegation, and Party networks.  The key notion is the necessity of preparing society for climate change.  The mandate comes from Agenda 21 on environmental education, across and throughout all the Chapters. [See strong policy statement, Chapter 36.1] BRIEFING – Preparing Society for Climate Change Environmental education is the future, it represents action and direction serving as a boundary.  Within the boundary represents participation, transparency, broad-based coalitions, justice, and CBDRRC, applied to the whole of the Climate Agreement and the 2020 Global Treaty. As it is integral to all the elements of climate change, relative to all actors: Recommended Action. Place environmental education in the Preamble, include in the Principles, and Action section of the texts. Please share with your country’s delegation, colleagues and networks.  We welcome your comments and support in the lead-up to Paris and 2020. All the best, Dr. Pam Puntenney UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chair Head of Climate Change Delegation <pjpunt@umich.edu>

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Draft Policy Briefing – Preparing Society for Climate Change

Dear Friends and Colleagues, Reporting from Lima, the Ed. Caucus delegation has been working on our policy briefing.  Your comments and insights are most welcome as we fine tune it focusing on 2015 and beyond 2020.  The briefing has caught the attention of several delegations as we refine the text.  Most of the initial work will be completed by the June meeting in Bonn, so we are taking advantage of direct contact with delegates while we are here. —-  The UN Sustainable Development Education Caucus has appreciated the support of policy makers and practitioners to move the environmental education and sustainability agenda forward.  To update you and your colleagues, here is a copy of our briefing for your delegation, and Party networks.  The key notion is the necessity of preparing society for climate change.  The mandate comes from Agenda 21 on environmental education, across and throughout all the Chapters. [See strong policy statement, Chapter 36.1] BRIEFING – Preparing Society for Climate Change Environmental education is the future, it represents action and direction serving as a boundary.  Within the boundary represents participation, transparency, broad-based coalitions, justice, and CBDRRC, applied to the whole of the Climate Agreement and the 2020 Global Treaty.  As it is integral to all the elements of climate change, relative to all actors: Recommended Action      Place environmental education in the Preamble, include in the Principles, and Action section of the texts.

Please share with your country’s delegation, colleagues and networks.

welcome your comments and support in the lead-up to Paris and 2020. All the best,

Dr. Pam Puntenney UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chair Head of Climate Change Delegation <pjpunt@umich.edu>

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