Science Matters

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CALL FOR POSTERS 2016/Italian Society for Climate Sciences – IV Annual Conference, October 19-20, 2016 – Cagliari (Italy)

CALL FOR POSTERS

Italian Society for Climate Sciences – IV Annual Conference
Climate challenges and solutions under the 2°C target

October 19-20, 2016 – Cagliari (Italy)

The Annual Conference of the Italian Society for Climate Sciences (SISC) will take place on October 19-20, 2016 at the Ex Manifattura Tabacchi, Cagliari, Italy.
The conference, entitled “Climate challenges and solutions under the 2°C target”, is organized by SISC in cooperation with other Italian Institutions and aims to foster the scientific debate among scientists, policy and decision makers (Italians and foreigners), NGOs members and other stakeholders whose activities are focused on climate change, as well as its relationships with the environment and socio-economic systems, opportunities and solutions helping in respecting the recent Paris agreement.
The main objectives of the Conference will be to summarize the Italian experience on climate research and policy action, within the international setting, and specifically:
•    To promote an interdisciplinary platform for sharing and discussing on climate risk for the environment and the society;
•    To highlight the scientific advances made to address the different aspects of climate change;
•    To explore possible solutions to cope with climate change by promoting a dialogue on policies and strategies regarding adaptation, mitigation, and sustainable growth.

TOPICS
The main topics that will be covered during the 2016 Conference edition will be:
•    Extreme Events
•    Climate Impacts
•    Adaptation opportunities
•    Sustainable development
•    Policies
•    Mitigation
•    Climate Services
•    Decarbonization

CONFERENCE STRUCTURE
The program of the SISC Annual Conference will consist of parallel sessions of high profile invited talks and contributing poster sessions covering the latest knowledge and research on climate change challenges and coping perspectives to respect the 2°C target.
The Conference is open to scientists, researchers, policy makers, entrepreneurs, associations and experts.
The participation of young researchers and PhD students is particularly welcome.

HOW TO PRESENT YOUR WORK
The organizing committee solicits contributions for the poster sessions (http://www.sisclima.it/conferenza-annuale-2016/call-for-poster/).
A short abstract (max 300 words) should be submitted at: sisc.conference@sisclima.it in its final version, in English, no later than July 31, 2016. Authors are requested to follow the editorial instructions available here (http://www.sisclima.it/conferenza-annuale-2016/guidelines-and-templates/).
The Scientific Committee will evaluate all poster abstracts that will be submitted in the requested format. A notification of the abstract acceptance will be communicated to the authors by August 12, 2016.

COST OF REGISTRATION
For more details on registration fees, please visit the Conference webpage: http://www.sisclima.it/conferenza-annuale-2016/.

IMPORTANT DATES
July 31, 2016 – Deadline for submission of poster abstracts.
August 12, 2016 – Notification of acceptance.
September 01, 2016 – Notification of the provisional program (uploading meeting program on web).
September 30, 2016 – Deadline for online registration.
October 10, 2016 – Notification of the final program (uploading meeting program on web).

For more information: sisc.conference@sisclima.it

Società Italiana per le Scienze del Clima (SISC)
Isola di San Giorgio Maggiore, n. 8, I-30124, Venezia – Italia
www.sisclima.itinfo@sisclima.it

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Apologies for cross-posting

If you wish to receive the SISC Newsletter, send an email to:
info@sisclima.it and write “Subscribe” in Subject field

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Weblink naar foto’s Dr Chu

Dear Sir/Madam,

The pictures taken during the Delft Nobel Evening Lecture by Prof. Chu are now ready and can be downloaded from: https://royborghouts.smugmug.com/TUDelftProfChu/

The entire lecture can be re-watched via the following link: http://player.companywebcast.com/avexeventstreaming/20160624_1/en/player

 Best regards,

Andrzej Stankiewicz

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Prof. dr. ir. A. Stankiewicz

Director,

TU Delft Process Technology Institute

Chair of Intensified Reaction and Separation Systems

Process & Energy Department

Delft University of Technology

Leeghwaterstraat 39

2628 CB Delft

The Netherlands

Phone: +31 15 2786678/2781476

Mobile: +31 6140 150 41

Email: a.i.stankiewicz@tudelft.nl 

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UNEA Science-Policy Forum 19-20 May 2016

Dear Colleagues,

UNEP is organizing the first ever global Science-Policy Forum in Nairobi, 19-20 May 2016, as part of the overall programme for the second session of the UN Environment Assembly (UNEA-2) which will take place 23-27 May 2016.

The Forum presents an excellent opportunity for the science community to engage with the policy-makers and have a constructive dialogue on the science and knowledge required to support informed decision-making and deliver on the environmental dimension of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. A number of high-level and inspirational speakers will address various sessions of the Forum. The attached flyer provides more information about the Forum.

I would be grateful if you could distribute the flyer to your respective stakeholders and networks.

For further information visit regulary: www.myunea.org

Thank you and regards

UNEP/DEWA

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2016 Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs: Registration for MGoS now open (deadline 22 May)

TO UN DESA NGO MAJOR GROUP & OTHER STAKEHOLDERS — FYI

From: Lotta Tahtinen <tahtinen@un.org>
Date: Tue, May 3, 2016
Subject: 2016 Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs: Registration for MGoS now open (deadline 22 May)
To: Lotta Tahtinen <tahtinen@un.org>

Technoligy Sustainable

Registration for Major Groups and other Stakeholders to attend the first multi-stakeholder Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs
6-7 June 2016, New York 

Dear all,

The first annual multi-stakeholder Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs (STI Forum) will be held from 6-7 June 2016 at the UN Headquarters in New York City. For more information, please visithttps://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/TFM/STIForum

All representatives of Major Groups and other Stakeholders who wish to attend the Forum must register by completing the following form by midnight on Sunday, 22 May 2016 (NY time): http://goo.gl/forms/bYHuwj91Cp

Please note that all participants are responsible for making their own travel arrangements, including visa arrangements. The UN will not be able to provide any travel support to this meeting.

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UNEA Science-Policy Forum 19-20 May 2016

Dear Colleagues,

UNEP is organizing the first ever global Science-Policy Forum in Nairobi, 19-20 May 2016, as part of the overall programme for the second session of the UN Environment Assembly (UNEA-2) which will take place 23-27 May 2016. 

The Forum presents an excellent opportunity for the science community to engage with the policy-makers and have a constructive dialogue on the science and knowledge required to support informed decision-making and deliver on the environmental dimension of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. A number of high-level and inspirational speakers will address various sessions of the Forum. The attached flyer provides more information about the Forum.

I would be grateful if you could distribute the flyer to your respective stakeholders and networks.

For further information visit regulary: www.myunea.org

Thank you and regards

UNEP/DEWA

S-P-Forum-Flyer Final (1 March 2016)(1)

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AIBS Seeks Interim Editor-in-Chief for BioScience

American Institute of Biological Sciences <polrept@aibs.org>
To: Louise <pearl_nalugwa@yahoo.com>
Sent: Tuesday, 15 March 2016,
Subject: AIBS Seeks Interim Editor-in-Chief for BioScience

View it in your browser.

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TR: Global Ocean Science Education Workshop – registration open

Dear Colleagues,
The IOC, the College of Exploration and the Consortium for Ocean Science Exploration, with the support of the European Commission and of the Institute of Marine Engineering Science and Technology,  is organising the Global Ocean Science Education workshop. The workshop will be held in Paris, UNESCO HQ, on 13-15 June 2016.
Registration for the workshop is now open.
Please, share this information with your networks.

Best, Bernard

Register Now

When ,13-15 June 2016, Where  Quick Links

2016 Workshop Draft Agenda

2015 Workshop Report

Contact

  UNESCO Headquarters

Paris, France

Registration now open!
2016 Global Ocean Science Education (GOSE) Workshop
Co-sponsored by Consortium for Ocean Science Exploration and Engagement (COSEE), the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, and the College of Exploration

Registration is now open for the 2016 Global Ocean Science Education (GOSE) Workshop, 13-15 June 2016 in Paris, France at UNESCO Headquarters.  A draft agenda for the 2016 GOSE workshop is also available.
Several registrations types include a special discount for COSEE members and single day registrations.
The 2016 GOSE Workshop will focus on the global ocean science education priority topics identified during the 2015 workshop:
  • Climate Change – ocean’s effect on climate and the effect of climate change on ocean systems
  • Fisheries and Biodiversity (including food security)
  • Oceans and Human Health (including coastal resiliency)
The workshop will include an effective practices session on marine related citizen science co-led by COSEE and the European Union’s Sea Change Project.
2016 GOSE Workshop Details
Meeting Times and Location
The meeting will begin at 1 pm on Monday, 13 June and adjourn at 5 pm on Wednesday, 15 June. All sessions will take place at United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Headquarters, 7, place de Fontenoy 75352 Paris 07 SP France.  A draft agenda is now available.
Accommodations
There are many small hotels within
walking distance of UNESCO Headquarters. The GOSE Planning Committee has compiled a list of hotels with contact information and recommends that delegates make their reservations soon, as June is a popular month for travel to Paris.
See you in Paris!
 For questions and inquires, please contact Romy Pizziconi, University of Rhode Island, romy@uri.edu or (401) 874-6119.
COSEE, Global Office, University of Rhode Island,Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI 02882

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Back to the Start

Science

I want both a world like this! Grateful, Kamila Mota!
Coldplay’s haunting classic ‘The Scientist’ is performed by country music legend Willie Nelson for the soundtrack of the short film entitled, “Back to the Start…

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Science Matters – Volkswagen scandal is a sorry sign of the times

David Suzuki Foundation

Volkswagen scandal is a sorry sign of the times

Cars in traffic
(Credit: Erik bij de Vaate via Flickr)

Volkswagen was caught cheating on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emissions tests by installing “defeat devices,” which allowed its diesel vehicles to pass nitrogen oxide emissions checks but spew up to 40 times allowable pollutants once they were completed. The scandal has resulted in plummeting share prices, CEO Martin Winterkorn’s resignation and up to $18 billion in fines, as well as recalls, stop-sale orders, impending lawsuits and possible criminal charges.

Beyond the betrayal and legal and financial issues, the effect on global pollution is massive. Volkswagen is the world’s largest automaker by sales, and as many as 11 million of its diesel vehicles are implicated. According to the Guardian, “The rigging of emissions tests may have added nearly a million tonnes of air pollution by VW cars annually — roughly the same as the UK’s combined emissions for all power stations, vehicles, industry and agriculture.”

Nitrogen oxide pollution creates particulate matter that causes respiratory problems and is linked to millions of premature deaths every year worldwide. It’s also a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon dioxide and so contributes to global warming.

The Volkswagen debacle is bad enough in itself, but it also raises questions about automaker practices, pollution, emissions standards and testing and the implications of our rampant car culture. Volkswagen cheated on regulations designed to protect human health and the environment, and the consequences are increased rates of asthma, lung disease, cancer and death. But it’s not just diesel cars and it’s not just vehicles from one company. Cars kill and harm millions of people every year, with accidents, pollution, climate change and other environmental damage. And car-makers have in the past resisted safety improvements such as seatbelts and air bags.

Illegally rigging vehicles to pass emissions tests hurts everyone, but legal loopholes create similar problems. Just look at SUVs. I did a quick count of the many passing my office during the afternoon, and almost all contained a single driver — no passengers or even pets! Under emissions laws in Canada, the U.S., Japan and elsewhere, SUVs are classified as “light-duty trucks” and are subject to less strict emissions standards than cars. Yet, most people treat them the same as cars.

This creates incentives for manufacturers to produce more heavy vehicles or even to design cars as trucks, such as Chrysler’s PT Cruiser. According to the Economist, “As vehicles above 3.8 tonnes were long exempted from the American regulation, manufacturers started producing enormous vehicles such as the Hummer to avoid any fuel-economy rules.”

Even with fuel-efficiency improvements, vehicle emissions have more than doubled since 1970 and will increase as demand rises in countries like China, India and Brazil, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Studies show that because fuel efficiency makes it less expensive to drive, people drive more. Clearly, we need better solutions.

It’s easy to say it starts with individuals. We can all find ways to reduce private automobile use. But individuals aren’t entirely to blame for our fossil-fuelled lifestyles. Incentives, regulations, policies and infrastructure are needed to create the necessary shift away from reliance on wasteful, inefficient transportation and fuel options.

We’ve seen many positive developments in recent years. In my hometown, Vancouver, and many other cities, car-sharing programs and cycling and pedestrian infrastructure are expanding rapidly. Hybrid and electric vehicle technologies are making great inroads. Recognition of the need for efficient public transit is also spreading around the world. And fuel taxes and carbon pricing have been proven effective at reducing reliance on private automobiles.

Taxing fossil fuel consumption may be more efficient than emissions standards because, as the Economist points out, fuel taxes encourage people, especially those who drive a lot, to buy more efficient cars and to drive less. And, “A fuel tax does not rely on dubious testing nor does it create distortive loopholes.” Revenue from taxes can be invested in cleaner transportation alternatives or, as with B.C.’s carbon tax, used to reduce income taxes or provide rebates to people with lower incomes.

It’s outrageous that a car manufacturer like Volkswagen would stoop to devious practices to get around laws designed to benefit all people, but in our car-driven culture, it’s not entirely surprising — just another signal that it’s time to rethink the way we move ourselves around.

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

 

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Science Matters – Welcome to an extreme, warming world

 David Suzuki Foundation
David Suzuki Foundation

Welcome to an extreme, warming world

nature
(Image credit: PVS444 via Flickr)
 My hometown, Vancouver, is in a rainforest, so we celebrate sunny days. People I talk to are enjoying the recent warm, dry weather, but they invariably add, “This isn’t normal” — especially with all the smoke from nearby forest fires.

With no mountain snowpack and almost no spring rain, rivers, creeks and reservoirs are at levels typically not seen until fall. Parks are brown. Blueberries, strawberries and other crops have arrived weeks earlier than usual. Wildfires are burning here and throughout Western Canada. Meanwhile, normally dry Kamloops has had record flooding, as has Toronto. Manitoba has been hit with several tornadoes and golf-ball-sized hail.

Unusual weather is everywhere. California is in its fourth year of severe drought. Temperatures in Spain, PortugalIndia and Pakistan have reached record levels, sparking wildfires and causing thousands of deaths and heat-related ailments. Heavy rains, flooding and an unusually high number of tornadoes have caused extensive damage and loss of life in Texas, Oklahoma and Mexico.

The likely causes are complex: a stuck jet stream, the Pacific El Niño, natural variation and climate change. Even though it’s difficult to link all events directly to global warming, climate scientists have warned for years that we can expect these kinds of extremes to continue and worsen as the world warms. Some hypothesize that the strange behaviours of this year’s jet stream and El Niño are related to climate change, with shrinking Arctic sea ice affecting the former.

Several recent studies indicate a clear connection between increasing extreme weather and climate change. One, by climatologists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado, looked at rising global atmospheric and sea-surface temperatures, which have increased water vapour in the atmosphere by about five per cent since the 1950s. According to the paper, published in Nature Climate Change, “This has fuelled larger storms, and in the case of hurricanes and typhoons, ones that ride atop oceans that are 19 centimetres higher than they were in the early 1900s. That sea-level rise increases the height of waves and tidal surges as storms make landfall.”

A Stanford University study found, “accumulation of heat in the atmosphere can account for much of the increase in extreme high temperatures, as well as an average decrease in cold extremes, across parts of North America, Europe and Asia,” but also concluded the influence of human activity on atmospheric circulation, another factor in climate change, is not well understood.

Earth is clearly experiencing more frequent extreme weather than in the past, and we can expect it to get worse as we burn more coal, oil and gas and pump more carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. This can have profound and costly impacts on everything from agriculture to infrastructure, not to mention human health and life.

As Pope Francis pointed out, climate change and social justice are intricately connected: “The human environment and the natural environment deteriorate together; we cannot adequately combat environmental degradation unless we attend to causes related to human and social degradation.”

That’s why so many people from Canada and around the world are calling for action as government leaders prepare for December’s UN climate summit in Paris: religious leaders including Pope Francis and the Dalai Lama; global organizations like the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, International Energy Agency and World Health Organization; businesses from Microsoft to Ikea to General Motors; and millions of people like those who marched for “Jobs, Justice and the Climate” in Toronto on July 5. All know the future of humanity depends on rapidly shifting the way we obtain and use energy.

Even though many world leaders recognize the problem, the recent G-7 agreement to decarbonize our energy by the end of the century is a horrifying joke. None of today’s politicians making the commitment will be alive to bear the responsibility for achieving the target, and the time frame doesn’t address the urgent need to begin huge reductions in fossil fuel use immediately.

Governments at the provincial, state and municipal levels have led the way in finding solutions. Now it’s time for national leaders to finally demonstrate real courage and foresight as they gear up for the Paris summit later this year.

Written with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

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Greetings from Shillong!

A note from Bremley regarding his “Stand Up for Climate – Stand Up for Life” Campaign, if you are interested in being involved read on…

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

I hope you are doing well  enjoying your summer. I just want to share something special that I am doing to help the poor people of Myanmar and restore their fragile mangrove ecosystems.

I want to invite you to join me and support our “Stand Up for Climate – Stand Up for Life” Campaign that I am launching on 17th July when I will be running the 2nd Cherrapunjee Marathon. I have been working on this Thor Heyerdahl Climate Park for the past three years and my campaign for this project has gone live for crowdfunding today. If you want to join me and Make a Difference then please share it with your friends, and if you can, chip-in $12 and we will plant a mangrove tree for you in your name at the project site.

We will champion small farmers and give work experience and job opportunities to women and young people living in the Delta Region of Myanmar. To see more check out this video, starring yours truly here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anj6RuQGUyc
During this campaign we need to get the number of people supporting as quickly as possible. It’s short notice before I run the marathon on 17th July but if you can invest $12 for one mangrove tree (or if you feel like it more) you’ll be helping my dream of restoring these fragile mangrove ecosystems become a reality in the Land of Gold – Myanmar. In return for every mangrove tree you buy you will get a mangrove tree certificate, and we will plant it for you in your name at Thor Heyerdahl Climate Park.
The link to our raise on Go get funding is here.
Please also follow us on:
Blogspot
Facebook
By sharing and supporting this campaign you can be some of the earliest champions to help save lives and create sustainable livelihoods for the poor farmers living in the vulnerable coastal zones in the Delta Region of Myanmar.

With warmest regards,

Bremley

Dr. Bremley W. B. Lyngdoh
Founder and Chief Executive
Worldview Impact Foundation

Worldview Space
1 Pope Street
London SE13PR
United Kingdom
Tel: +44-2073788872
Mob: +44-7899897823
The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams – Eleanor Roosevelt

 

Profile of the mangrove restoration project in the delta region of Myanmar

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