Climate Change Convention

 

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MIT Climate CoLab– Voting Now Open

Dear Colleagues,
MIT Climate CoLab (www.climatecolab.org) is an online crowdsourcing platform of over 58,000 members from around the world, sourcing innovative proposals on addressing climate change.  Topic areas range from smart zero-carbon cities, low-carbon energy supplies, reducing emissions from buildings and transport, behavioral change strategies, climate change adaptation, and many more.
An initiative of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence at the Sloan School of Management, Climate CoLab has recently announced 60 Finalists from among the nearly 500 proposals submitted to the platform since February. Now, the public has the opportunity to vote for the most promising Finalist proposals.
From July 5 – July 31, 2016, anyone from around the world can vote for one proposal per contest. Entries with the most votes at the end of the voting period, will be given the Popular Choice Award, and invited to present at MIT Climate CoLab’s Crowds & Climate Conference (climatecolab.org/conference2016) September 28 – 29, where a $10,000 Grand Prize will be awarded.
Please feel encouraged to spread the word about the public voting opportunity to your networks. Sample content is included below for your convenience.
Best,
Climate CoLab
Twitter: @ClimateCoLab
Hashtag: #climatevote  #ClimateCoLab

Sample Tweets:

60 Finalists announced on #MIT @ClimateCoLab! #Climatevote for your favorite proposals by 7/31 at climatecolab.org/contests.
Finalists announced on #MIT @ClimateCoLab! #Climatevote for your favorite #climate proposals by 7/31 at climatecolab.org/contests.
Hashtag: #climatevote  #ClimateCoLab
Sample Facebook or LinkedIn post:

Want to help jumpstart innovative climate solutions? MIT’s Climate CoLab wants you to #climatevote for your favorite climate change proposals from among 60 Finalists selected by expert judges. Public voting now open until July 31 at climatecolab.org/contests.

Finalists are announced at MIT’s Climate CoLab, and now open to a public vote. Expert judges selected 60 Finalists from among the nearly 500 proposals on addressing climate change submitted, and now encourages public participation in voting for favorites! Public voting available from July 5 – 31 at climatecolab.org/contests. Proposals with the largest amount of votes will win the Popular Choice award and be invited to present at MIT.


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COP/GLF: Insecure land rights of indigenous peoples and investor risk, social conflict, climate change

Dear colleague:

The Nature Conservancy and the International Indigenous Peoples’ Forum on Climate change will host a panel concerning land rights of indigenous peoples and the tremendous pressure that extractive, hydropower and agricultural development projects are putting on natural landscapes and Indigenous and local community territories,

The respect and recognition of Indigenous Peoples’ rights, customary land tenure and traditional knowledge have significantly contributed to more sustainable use and management of various ecosystems.

This has been documented in a variety of studies and most recently in a report from the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI) and the World Resources Institute (WRI) suggesting that indigenous peoples outperform every other owner, public or private in forest conservation.

There is ample evidence that government development plans and projects, private corporations’ investments have and are continuing to cause Indigenous Peoples’ criminalization, displacement and the depletion of resources.

Speakers at the session will represent both Indigenous Peoples’ organizations and corporate representatives to explore the crucial question: Is a triple-win – where the economy, people and the climate all benefit – possible, despite the many documented and potential conflicts.

Harboring some of the world’s most carbon-rich and undeveloped places, lands managed by Indigenous Peoples and local communities play a crucial role in stewarding the world’s natural carbon stores. Private sector interests in these landscapes create both enormous risks and opportunities for these communities.

A new study released this week at the COP21 by a collaboration of indigenous peoples’ groups from Africa, Latin America and Asia, and the Woods Hole Research Center and the Environmental Defense Fund reports that forests on indigenous territories store at least 20 percent of the carbon in tropical forests worldwide. Previous
research has shown that community forest rights that are legally recognized and protected by governments often translate into healthy forests with high forest carbon storage, and reduced deforestation. But achieving secure rights requires investments to strengthen legal protections and ensure their implementation, as well as to strengthen the capacity of local people to sustainably manage and benefit from forest resources.

Yet the obstacles are significant. A recent study of 64 countries suggests that indigenous peoples and local communities lack legal rights to almost three-quarters of their traditional lands, including forests.

In addition to carbon storage, secure community forest rights are known to produce a suite of other economic, social and environmental benefits, including reduced conflict, improved biodiversity and water regulation, increased job creation, reinvestment in local communities, and reduced out-migration, as well as avoided deforestation.

Protecting tropical forests on indigenous lands from clearing, burning, mining, unsustainable logging and other threats is not only important for preventing increases of atmospheric CO2, it is essential for maintaining other vital environmental services. Moreover, forest destruction can have devastating immediate environmental and health impacts, such as those caused by smoke and haze arising from forest clearing

For interviews in advance or after the event, please contact:

Coimbra Sirica, +1 301 943 3287, or

Michelle Geis, +33 6 26 75 34 90.

 

Warm regards, Coimbra Sirica

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UN SD Ed. Caucus Briefing:  UN Climate Change – Newly Released Texts from Co-Chairs “Durban Platform for Enhanced Action” [ADP]

Apologies, I just sent the working draft- please ignore. 
Note: this is the final version for your use with your colleagues and networks.  As you will see we are doing well, always a work in progress with challenges and opportunities.  To all of you who have and do provide us with your insights, edits, updates, lobbying efforts and more, thank you.  Pam

Dear Friends and Colleagues, 

Today the Co-Chairs of the ADP posted three new documents on the UNFCCC website, visit

They include: a revised non-paper on elements of the 2015 agreement; a draft decision on advancing implementation of the Durban Platform (which combines the two previous separate draft decisions on INDC information requirements and pre-2020 ambition into a single text); and a scenario note for the ADP session in Lima.

 A Pathway…

The revised non-paper includes references to environmental education and sustainability through engaging diverse stakeholders, increasing understanding and enhanced action in five areas.  We have provided advice, briefings, and more on long-term cooperative action, building trust and confidence, and building “A well-prepared society”, transparency, informed consent, and demand driven at all levels.  What is missing here is the intergenerational component on Youth.

——-
Non-paper highlights on Education and Climate Change
A.  Preamble
• Being guided by 
the principles of the Convention as set out in its Article 3, including that Parties should protect the climate system for the benefit of present and future generations of humankind, on the basis of equity and in accordance with evolving common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities,
• Acknowledging 
that the global nature and urgency of climate change calls for the widest possible participation, co-operation and ambitious action by all Parties,
• Being guided by 
the best available scientific knowledge, including the assessment reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change,
• Emphasizing 
that adaptation is a global challenge and a common responsibility requiring global solidarity that must be addressed with the same urgency as and in political parity with mitigation,
•  Reaffirming 
the importance of education, training, public awareness, public participation, public access to information and international cooperation on these matters for promoting changes in lifestyles, attitudes and behavior needed to foster low-emission and climate-resilient development and to mobilize public support for climate policies and action,
• Stressing 
that all actions to address climate change and processes established under this agreement should ensure a gender-responsive approach, take into account the protection of the integrity of Mother Earth, and respect human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples,
• Recognizing that cooperative action by and among subnational authorities, intergovernmental organizations, civil society, indigenous peoples, local communities, the private sector, financial institutions and Parties can catalyze and significantly enhance the impact of policy implementation by Parties in reducing emissions and vulnerability and building resilience to the adverse effects of climate change,
C.  General
• All Parties to strive to achieve low greenhouse gas climate-resilient economies and societies, on the basis of equity and in accordance with their evolving common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in order to achieve sustainable development, poverty eradication and prosperity for the benefit of present and future generations of humankind.
• Parties to cooperate, including through regional approaches, bilateral, multilateral, South–South and triangular cooperation, and take appropriate measures to develop, adopt and implement policies, strategies, regulations and/or action plans on climate change education, training, public awareness, public participation and public access to information at all levels to enable transformative change towards low-emission and climate-resilient societies.
D.  Mitigation
Long-term and global aspects of Mitigation
• Parties may prepare, communicate and implement mitigation commitments/contributions jointly in accordance with decisions to be adopted by the governing body, and taking into account any arrangements developed under paragraph 30 (Cooperation and support for implementation).
E.  Adaptation and loss and damage
Long-term and global aspects of adaptation
• All Parties to enhance cooperation and support to developing country Parties to adapt to the adverse effects of climate change, and ensure resilience under the long-term temperature limit and to achieve sustainable development, while recognizing the local, national and transboundary dimensions of adaptation.
Commitments/ contributions on adaptation
• Commitments/contributions should be country-driven, gender-sensitive, participatory, and fully transparent, take into account vulnerable groups and ecosystems, be based on science and traditional and indigenous knowledge, and promote the engagement of subnational and local authorities and other stakeholders.
Sharing information, knowledge and lessons learned
• All Parties to enhance learning on adaptation through sharing of information, knowledge and lessons learned on adaptation practices, subject to modalities and procedures to be adopted/developed.
The governing body shall request the SBSTA to develop guidelines for 
strengthening the sharing of information, knowledge and lessons learned 
under the Nairobi work programme on impacts, vulnerability and 
adaptation to climate change:
a. Address the knowledge gap in the area of the implementation of
adaptation;
b. Strengthen local and institutional capacity;
c. Enhance regional and transboundary aspects;
d. Encourage all Parties to implement education and public awareness 
programmes in accordance with paragraph 12.
I.  Capacity Building
General
•  Capacity-building to be guided by the following:
     d. Responding to national needs and fostering country ownership:
e. Responding to needs at the national, sub-national and local levels;
g. Ensuring that capacity-building is effective, demand-driven and sustainable
in a long term.
•  Capacity-building to be enhanced through:
a. The development of climate policies; 
       b.   Mobilization of private sector capital and public engagement; 
       c. Promotion of public awareness and education; 
       d. Strengthening of domestic institutions and creation of enabling
  environments; 
       e. Integrating capacity-building activities in mitigation and adaptation 
  programmes.
********
The scenario note indicates the intention to conduct negotiations in Lima under the contact group.  They add that “Focused negotiations under the contact group will be undertaken in parallel meetings and facilitated by either one of the Co-Chairs. They also encourage more intensive informal consultations among Parties on specific issues where you can narrow down options, build bridges and develop common proposals for consideration by the contact group, as had commenced in Bonn in October.”
The ADP scenario note is also useful as it serves as an overview or general roadmap for Lima, 2015 lead-up, COP 21, 2015 towards 2020.
We are doing well.
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change
with Tiahoga Ruge, Jim Taylor, Tich Pesanayi, Kavita Myles, Suzana Padua 
Youth Co-Coordinator: Katherine Browne
COP 20 Co-Chair: Barbara Benish [ArtDialogue]

 

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UN Climate Change – Newly Released Texts from Co-Chairs “Durban Platform for Enhanced Action” [ADP]

Dear Friends and Colleagues, 

Today the Co-Chairs of the ADP posted three new documents on the UNFCCC website, visit

They include: a revised non-paper on elements of the 2015 agreement; a draft decision on advancing implementation of the Durban Platform (which combines the two previous separate draft decisions on INDC information requirements and pre-2020 ambition into a single text); and a scenario note for the ADP session in Lima.

 A Pathway

The revised non-paper includes references to environmental education and sustainability through engaging diverse stakeholders, increasing understanding and enhanced action in

A.  Preamble
Being guided by 
the principles of the Convention as set out in its Article 3, including that Parties should protect the climate system for the benefit of present and future generations of humankind, on the basis of equity and in accordance with evolving common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities,
• Acknowledging 
that the global nature and urgency of climate change calls for the widest possible participation, co-operation and ambitious action by all Parties,
• Being guided by 
the best available scientific knowledge, including the assessment reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change,
• Emphasizing 
that adaptation is a global challenge and a common responsibility requiring global solidarity that must be addressed with the same urgency as and in political parity with mitigation,
•  Reaffirming 
the importance of education, training, public awareness, public participation, public access to information and international cooperation on these matters for promoting changes in lifestyles, attitudes and behavior needed to foster low-emission and climate-resilient development and to mobilize public support for climate policies and action,
• Stressing 
that all actions to address climate change and processes established under this agreement should ensure a gender-responsive approach, take into account the protection of the integrity of Mother Earth, and respect human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples,
• Recognizing that cooperative action by and among subnational authorities, intergovernmental organizations, civil society, indigenous peoples, local communities, the private sector, financial institutions and Parties can catalyze and significantly enhance the impact of policy implementation by Parties in reducing emissions and vulnerability and building resilience to the adverse effects of climate change,
General
• All Parties to strive to achieve low greenhouse gas climate-resilient economies and societies, on the basis of equity and in accordance with their evolving common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in order to achieve sustainable development, poverty eradication and prosperity for the benefit of present and future generations of humankind.
Long-term and global aspects of adaptation
• Parties to cooperate, including through regional approaches, bilateral, multilateral, South–South and triangular cooperation, and take appropriate measures to develop, adopt and implement policies, strategies, regulations and/or action plans on climate change education, training, public awareness, public participation and public access to information at all levels to enable transformative change towards low-emission and climate-resilient societies.
E.  Adaptation and loss and damage
Long-term and global aspects of adaptation
• All Parties to enhance cooperation and support to developing country Parties to adapt to the adverse effects of climate change, and ensure resilience under the long-term temperature limit and to achieve sustainable development, while recognizing the local, national and transboundary dimensions of adaptation.
Commitments/ contributions on adaptation
• Commitments/contributions should be country-driven, gender-sensitive, participatory, and fully transparent, take into account vulnerable groups and ecosystems, be based on science and traditional and indigenous knowledge, and promote the engagement of subnational and local authorities and other stakeholders.
Sharing information, knowledge and lessons learned
• All Parties to enhance learning on adaptation through sharing of information, knowledge and lessons learned on adaptation practices, subject to modalities and procedures to be adopted/developed.
The governing body shall request the SBSTA to develop guidelines for 
strengthening the sharing of information, knowledge and lessons learned 
under the Nairobi work programme on impacts, vulnerability and 
adaptation to climate change:
a. Address the knowledge gap in the area of the implementation of
adaptation;
b. Strengthen local and institutional capacity;
c. Enhance regional and transboundary aspects;
d. Encourage all Parties to implement education and public awareness 
programmes in accordance with paragraph 12.
I.  Capacity Building
General
•  Capacity-building to be guided by the following:
     d. Responding to national needs and fostering country ownership:
e. Responding to needs at the national, sub-national and local levels;
g. Ensuring that capacity-building is effective, demand-driven and sustainable
in a long term.
•  Capacity-building to be enhanced through:
a. The development of climate policies; 
       b.   Mobilization of private sector capital and public engagement; 
       c. Promotion of public awareness and education; 
      d. Strengthening of domestic institutions and creation of enabling
  environments; 
       e. Integrating capacity-building activities in mitigation and adaptation 
  programmes.
 ********
The scenario note indicates the intention to conduct negotiations in Lima under the contact group.  They add that “Focused negotiations under the contact group will be undertaken in parallel meetings and facilitated by either one of the Co-Chairs. They also encourage more intensive informal consultations among Parties on specific issues where you can narrow down options, build bridges and develop common proposals for consideration by the contact group, as had commenced in Bonn in October.”
The ADP scenario note is also useful as it serves as an overview or general roadmap for Lima, 2015 lead-up, COP 21, 2015 towards 2020.
All the best,
Pam Puntenney and Bremley Lyngdoh
UN SD Education Caucus Co-Chairs
Co-Coordinators Climate Change
with Tiahoga Ruge, Jim Taylor, Tich Pesanayi, Kavita Myles, Suzana Padua 
Youth Co-Coordinator: Katherine Browne
COP 20 Co-Chair: Barbara Benish [Art Dialogue]

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Climate Change and IP Rights Convention resolves against False Solution in Manipur

Dear Friends,

Glad to share outcome          statement and media response of a Manipur State Convention on          Climate Change, False Solutions and Indigenous Peoples Rights,          organized by Centre for Research and Advocacy, Manipur on 10          November, which expressed concern with the large scale          unsustainable development processes financed by international          financial institutions, viz, ADB, World Bank etc, fast folding          in Manipur with serious climate change implications. The          convention also resolved against all forms of false climate          change solutions, such as large dams for CDM projects and          REDD+ etc in Manipur and further called on all concerned to          respect indigenous peoples rights over their land and          territories and their self determined rights to development.
Best wishes,
Jiten Yumnam
Secretary,            Centre for Research and            Advocacy, Manipur
(Forum            for Indigenous Peoples &            Action, Manipur)
 Sega            Road Hodam Leirak
Imphal            Manipur NE India 795001
Ph: 91            9774328712
State level Convention on Climate Change, False                Solutions                and Indigenous Peoples Rights in Manipur
E-Pao.net                 
10th                November, 2014:
The State level Convention on Climate              Change, False Solutions and Indigenous Peoples Rights in              Manipur, was organized              by Centre for Research and Advocacy, Manipur at Manipur              Press Club on 10              November 2014.  Ms. Maibam              Nganbileima, Lamphel Yaipha Leikai eviction victim, Mr.              Mani Khuman, President,              All Manipur United Clubs Organization graced as presidium              members.
              Mr. Jiten Yumnam, Secretary, Centre for Research and              Advocacy, Manipur in his              key note highlighted the context of deepening climate              crisis in Manipur and how              aggressive introduction of large scale development              projects in Manipur, such as              mega dams, oil exploration, creation of industrial zones              and other large              infrastructure projects such as Road and Railways              infrastructure with financing              by International Financial Institutions led to violation              of indigenous peoples              rights in Manipur by destroying their forest, water and              land.
Convention on Climate Change, False                Solutions and Indigenous Peoples Rights                in Manipur on 10 Nov, 2014
              Mr. Phulindro Konsam, Chairman, Committee on Human Rights              shared how              development decisions and processes, such as new MoUs on              mega dams are pursued              against the aspirations of indigenous peoples of Manipur.              Mega development              projects are often anti people, destroyed their forest,              water, agriculture land              etc and involves human rights violations. All development              processes should respect              indigenous peoples self determined rights and their right              to free, prior and              informed consent.
Mr. Achom Brojen of Kongba and Mr. Nahakpam Ibochouba of              Langthabal shared the              concerns and the failure of the Asian Development Bank              loaned Imphal Ring Road              plan to consult and take the free, prior and informed              consent of affected              communities and to take detailed impact assessment due to              such large projects.
Mr. Gopen, Irabot Foundation elucidated how current day              forcible development              that benefit multinational corporations with their forced              acquisition of              agriculture land will undermine food sovereignty of              Manipur.
Convention on Climate Change, False                Solutions and Indigenous Peoples Rights                in Manipur on 10 Nov, 2014
              Mr. Oinam Rajen, Secretary, All Loktak Lake Areas              Fishermen Union spoke how the              commissioning of the 105 MW submerged more than 80,000              acres of prime              agriculture land and contributed in deepening climate              crisis and how the              National Hydroelectric Power Corporation remains              unaccountable in Manipur,              failing to rehabilitate and compensate those affected by              their Loktak Project.              Fishing communities were also evicted from Loktak Wetlands              by the promulgation              of the Manipur Loktak Lake Protection Act, 2006.
Dr. RK Ranjan, Senior environmentalist shared indigenous              peoples have intrinsic              relationship with our land and resources. Development              processes in Manipur are              often insensitive to the cultures, traditions and rights              of indigenous peoples.              Today, Manipur is unpredictable in its climate              manifestations due to such              insensitivities. Manipur is now forced to depend on              outside for its food needs              as a result of loss of agriculture land.
Dr. Y. Mani Khuman, President, AMUCO shared how              introduction of development              process is bereft of peoples participation and how such              unsustainable              development models contributed in climate crisis.              There’s much inconsistence              with the conduct of the Government which talks of              protecting agriculture land              while conscripting agriculture land for corporatization              and privatization of              our land and resources. Ms. Nganbileima Maibam shared on              the fast shrinking              wetlands and climate change implications and how              communities depending on the              wetlands are forcibly and mercilessly evicted.
The participants also adopted the following resolutions:               1) Express concern with worsening climate changes in              Manipur, frequent flood,              drought, species loss etc and impact on indigenous              peoples’ cultures,              traditions and their survival.
2) Expresses concern with aggressive pursuance of              development processes,              especially large scale mega development processes in              Manipur with serious              climate change implications, viz, mega dams, oil              exploration and drilling, etc,              which destroyed peoples’ land, forest, wetlands etc.
3) Concerned with Government of Manipur’s MoU’s with              corporate bodies for mega              dams and to drill oil and gas in Manipur. The colossal              forest area submergence              of these mega dams, including 27,000 hectares, by the              planned 1500 MW Tipaimukh              dam etc will aggravate climate crisis.
4) Express concern with the increased agriculture land              grabbing by mega              projects such as the Film Institute, Sports University,              Trans Asian Highway and              railway etc. Loss of Agriculture land will deepen climate              crisis and undermine              food sovereignty of Manipur.
5) Concern with increased investment of International              Financial Institutions,              viz, Asian Development Bank for mega infrastructure              projects such as Imphal              Town Ring Road without detailed impact assessment, option              assessment and consent              of communities.
6) Further concerned with the Manipur State Action Plan on              Climate Change that              prioritized false solutions to climate change, such as              mega dams and REDD+ that              will lead to negative impacts on indigenous peoples. All              MoUs on Mega dams should              be revoked and policies that facilitate such projects,              viz, the Manipur Hydro              Power Policy, 2012 and Manipur State Action Plan on              Climate Change etc should              be repealed.
7) The National Hydroelectric Power Corporation should              cease all efforts to seek              carbon credits and additional profits from the Clean              Development Mechanism by              classifying the controversial 105 MW Loktak Project in              Manipur as clean and              renewable energy project.
8) Express concern with the non recognition of indigenous              peoples rights in              forging out appropriate solutions in really mitigating              climate change and in              adapting to climate crisis.
9) There should be moratorium on large scale destructive              unsustainable              development projects in Manipur, primarily mega dams’              construction, oil exploration,              large infrastructure projects, which will destroy our              forest, wetlands,              agriculture land etc. Review Mapithel dam construction.
10) Alternative energies, indigenous peoples’              traditional knowledge and              practices such as diversified agriculture; community-based              adaptation etc              should be promoted in Manipur.
11) The upcoming climate change negotiations in 20 COP at              Lima Peru should              ensure recognition of indigenous peoples self determined              rights and              development. The emphasis accorded on Private sector              financing as solution to              climate crisis in International climate negotiations              should end urgently.
12) The process of tackling global climate change has              unfortunately been              considered as an opportunity for economic benefits.              Climate crisis cannot be resolved              within the framework of “market solutions.” States              should abandon all false              solutions to climate changes that negate Indigenous              Peoples’ rights.

CRA deplores            State’s false solution on            climate change

The Imphal Free Press,              11 November 2014
IMPHAL, November 10:              “Development of the State should include              every citizen. There cannot be development for a              particular community or              individual”, said Oinam Rajen, secretary, All Loktak              Lake Areas Fisherman Union              at the one day convention held at the Manipur Press Club              here today.
The convention was              organised by Centre for              Research and Advocacy, Manipur on “Climate Change, False              Solution and              Indigenous Peoples’ Rights in Manipur.
While delivering the              keynote address at              the convention, Jiten Yumnam, secretary, Centre for              Research and Advocacy,              Manipur said that the consultation was organised in the              context of deepening              climate crisis amidst aggressive introduction of large              scale development              projects in Manipur.
The industrial zones and              other development              such as mega dams, oil exploration, and large              infrastructure projects such as              road and railway which involve either submergence or              destruction of forest and              water will ultimately contribute in climate crisis in              Manipur, he added.
During the convention              the participants              discussed the ongoing aggressive push by the government to              promote false              solution to climate crisis such as reducing emission and              forest degradation and              deforestation.
The resolution taken              during the convention              were concern with worsening climate in Manipur, frequent              floods, droughts,              species loss etc and impact on the indigenous people’s              cultures, tradition and              their survival.
The meet also expressed              concern over the              government of Manipur’s MOUs with corporate bodies for              mega dams and to drill              oil and gas in Manipur. The colossal forest area              submergence of these mega              dams, including 27,000 hectares, by the planned 1500 MW              Tipaimukh dam will              aggravate climate crisis, it maintained.
It further took serious              note on the              increased agriculture land grabbing by mega projects such              as the Film              Institute, Sports University, Trans Asian Highway and              Railway. Loss of              agriculture land will deepen climate crisis and undermine              food sovereignty of              Manipur, it observed.
The meet also pointed              out that increased              investment of International Financial Institutions namely              Asian Development              Bank for mega infrastructure projects such as Imphal Town              Ring Road without              detailed impact assessment, option assessment and consent              of communities is              deplorable.
It demanded that all              MOUs on mega dams              should be revoked and policies that facilitate such              projects, namely the              Manipur Hydro Power Policy, 2012 and Manipur State Action              Plan on Climate              Change should be repealed.
The National              Hydroelectric Power              Corporation should cease all efforts to seek carbon              credits and additional              profits from the Clean Development Mechanism by              classifying the controversial              105 MW Loktak Project in Manipur as clean and renewable              energy project, it              maintained.
The meet also demanded              that the process of              tackling global climate has unfortunately been considered              as an opportunity for              economic benefits. Climate crisis cannot be resolved              within the framework of              “market solutions” and the State should abandon all              false solution to climate              change that negates Indigenous Peoples’ rights.
The function was also              attended by              Phulindro Konsam, chairman, Committee on Human Rights and              Dr RK Ranjan, senior              environmentalist.
 
Manipur:                Convention on Climate Change held
The North East Today
11 November 2014-11-11
IMPHAL: The State              level Convention on Climate              Change, False Solutions and Indigenous Peoples Rights in              Manipur, was organized              by Centre for Research and Advocacy, Manipur at Manipur              Press Club here today.
Ms. Maibam              Nganbileima, Lamphel Yaipha              Leikai eviction victim, Mr.Mani Khuman, President, All              Manipur United Clubs              Organization graced               as presidium members.
Mr. Jiten              Yumnam, Secretary, Centre for              Research and Advocacy, Manipur in his key note highlighted              the context of              deepening climate crisis in Manipur and how aggressive              introduction of large              scale development projects in Manipur, such as mega dams, oil exploration,              creation of industrial zones and other              large infrastructure projects such as Road and Railways              infrastructure with              financing by International Financial Institutions led to violation of indigenous              peoples              rights in Manipur by destroying their forest, water and              land.
Mr.              Phulindro Konsam, Chairman,              Committee on Human Rights shared              how development decisions and processes, such as new MoUs              on mega dams are              pursued against the aspirations of indigenous peoples of              Manipur. Mega              development projects are often anti people, destroyed              their forest, water,              agriculture land etc and involves human rights violations.              All development processes should respect indigenous              peoples self determined              rights and their right to free, prior and informed              consent.
Mr. Achom              Brojen of Kongba and Mr.              Nahakpam Ibochouba of Langthabal shared the concerns and              the failure of the              Asian Development Bank loaned Imphal Ring Road plan to              consult and take the              free, prior and informed consent of affected communities              and to take detailed              impact assessment due to such large projects. Mr. Gopen,              Irabot Foundation              elucidated how current day forcible development that              benefit multinational              corporations with their forced acquisition of agriculture              land will undermine              food sovereignty of Manipur.
Mr. Oinam              Rajen, Secretary, All Loktak              Lake Areas Fishermen Union spoke how the commissioning of              the 105 MW submerged              more than 80,000 acres of prime agriculture land and              contributed in deepening              climate crisis and how the National Hydroelectric Power              Corporation remains              unaccountable in Manipur, failing to rehabilitate and              compensate those affected              by their Loktak Project. Fishing communities were also              evicted from Loktak              Wetlands by the promulgation of the Manipur Loktak Lake              Protection Act, 2006.
Dr. RK              Ranjan, Senior environmentalist              shared indigenous peoples have intrinsic relationship with              our land and              resources. Development processes in Manipur are often              insensitive to the              cultures, traditions and rights of indigenous peoples.              Today, Manipur is              unpredictable in its climate manifestations due to such              insensitivities.              Manipur is now forced to depend on outside for its food              needs as a result of              loss of agriculture land.
Dr. Y.              Mani Khuman, President, AMUCO              shared how introduction of development process is bereft              of peoples              participation and how such unsustainable development              models contributed in              climate crisis. There’s much inconsistence with the              conduct of the Government              which talks of protecting agriculture land while              conscripting agriculture land              for corporatization and privatization of our land and              resources.
Ms.              Nganbileima Maibam shared on the              fast shrinking wetlands and climate change implications              and how communities              depending on the wetlands are forcibly and mercilessly              evicted. The              participants also adopted resolutions among which are the              concern with              worsening climate changes in Manipur, frequent flood,              drought, species loss etc              and impact on indigenous peoples’ cultures, traditions              and their survival.
Another              resolution expresses concern              with aggressive pursuance of development processes,              especially large scale mega              development processes in               Manipur with serious climate change implications,              viz, mega dams, oil exploration and              drilling, etc, which destroyed peoples’ land, forest,              wetlands etc.
One              resolution is on the concerned with              Government of Manipur’s MoU’s with corporate bodies              for mega dams and to drill              oil and gas in Manipur. The colossal forest area              submergence of these mega              dams, including 27,000 hectares, by the planned 1500 MW              Tipaimukh dam etc will              aggravate climate crisis.
The              convention also express concern with              the increased agriculture land grabbing by mega projects              such as the Film              Institute, Sports University, Trans               Asian Highway and railway etc. Loss of Agriculture land              will deepen climate              crisis and undermine food sovereignty of Manipur.
One of the              resolutions said concern with              increased investment of InternationalFinancial Institutions,              viz, Asian Development Bank for              mega infrastructure projects such as Imphal Town Ring Road              without detailed              impact assessment, option assessment and consent of              communities.
Further,              the convention also expressed              concerned with the Manipur State Action Plan on Climate              Change that prioritized              false solutions to climate change, such as mega dams and              REDD+ that will lead              to negative impacts on indigenous peoples. All MoUs on              Mega dams should be              revoked and policies that facilitate such projects, viz,              the Manipur Hydro Power Policy,              2012 and Manipur State Action Plan on Climate Change etc              should be               repealed.
The              National Hydroelectric Power              Corporation should cease all efforts to seek carbon              credits and additional              profits from the Clean Development Mechanism by              classifying the controversial              105 MW Loktak Project in Manipur as clean and renewable              energy project.
Express              concern with the non recognition              of indigenous peoples rights in forging out appropriate              solutions in really              mitigating climate change and in adapting to climate              crisis.
The              convention felt that there should be              moratorium on large scale destructive unsustainable              development projects in              Manipur, primarily mega dams’ construction, oil exploration,              large infrastructure projects, which              will destroy our forest, wetlands, agriculture land etc.              Review Mapithel dam              construction.
Alternative              energies, indigenous              peoples’ traditional knowledge and practices such as              diversified agriculture;              community-based adaptation etc should be promoted in              Manipur, the programme              added.
The              upcoming climate change negotiations              in 20 COP at Lima Peru should ensure recognition of              indigenous peoples self              determined rights and development. The emphasis accorded              on Private sector              financing as solution to climate crisis in International              climate negotiations              should end urgently.
The              process of tackling global climate              change has unfortunately been considered as an opportunity              for economic              benefits. Climate crisis cannot be resolved within the              framework of “market              solutions.” States should abandon all false solutions to              climate changes that              negate Indigenous Peoples’ rights, the convention              expressed. (NNN)
Abandoning false solutions to                climate                changes suggested
The              Sangai Express, 11 November 2014
IMPHAL,              Nov 10 : Expressing concern              over the worsening climate changes in Manipur resulting in              frequent flood,              drought, loss of species and impact on indigenous peoples’              cultures, traditions              and their survival, a State level convention on climate              change, false solutions              and indigenous peoples’ rights in Manipur held today at              Manipur Press Club              resolved that climate crisis cannot be resolved within the              framework of              “market solutions” while calling for States to abandon all              false              solutions to climate changes that negate indigenous              peoples’ rights. The              convention was organised by Centre for Research and              Advocacy, Manipur.
Phulindro              Konsam, chairman, Committee              on Human Rights; secretary of All Loktak Lake Area              Fishermen’s Union, Oinam              Rajen; senior environmentalist Dr RK Ranjan, president of              AMUCO Mani Khuman,              organising secretary of Irabot Foundation, Manipur, Gopen,              victim of Lamphel              Yaipha Leikai eviction, Maibam Nganbileima and RIMS road              victim N Ibochouba              were the resource persons of the programme.
Delivering              the keynote address, Jiten              Yumnam, secretary, Centre for Research and Advocacy,              Manipur highlighted the              context of deepening climate crisis in Manipur and how              aggressive introduction              of large scale development projects in Manipur, such as              mega dams, oil              exploration, creation of industrial zones and other large              infrastructure              projects such as Road and Railways infrastructure with              financing by international              financial institutions lead to violation of indigenous              peoples rights in              Manipur by destroying their forest, water and land. The              participants expressed              concern over aggressive pursuance of development              processes, especially large              scale mega development processes in Manipur with serious              climate change              implications, like mega dams, oil exploration and              drilling, etc, which destroy              peoples’ land, forest, wetlands etc.
The              speakers and participants are also              concerned with Government of Manipur’s MoUs with corporate              bodies for mega dams              and to drill oil and gas in Manipur. The convention              underlined that the              colossal forest area submergence of these mega dams,              including 27,000 hectares,              by the planned 1500 MW Tipaimukh dam etc will aggravate              climate crisis. Expressing              concern over the increased agriculture land grabbing by              mega projects such as              the Film Institute, Sports University, Trans Asian Highway              and railway etc the              convention said that loss of agriculture land will deepen              climate crisis and              undermine self sufficiency of food.
It              also expressed concerned over              increased investment of International financial              institutions such as Asian              Development Bank for mega infrastructure projects like              Imphal Ring Road without              detailed impact assessment, option assessment and consent              of communities. Concerned              with the Manipur State Action Plan on Climate Change that              prioritize false              solutions to climate change, such as mega dams and REDD+              that will lead to              negative impacts on indigenous peoples, the convention              adopted a resolution              that all MoUs on Mega dams be revoked and policies that              facilitate such              projects, viz, the Manipur Hydro Power Policy, 2012 and              Manipur State Action              Plan on Climate Change etc be repealed.
The              National Hydro Electric Power              Corporation should cease all efforts to seek carbon              credits and additional              profits from the Clean Development Mechanism by              classifying the controversial              105 MW Loktak Project in Manipur as clean and renewable              energy project, it              further adopted.
The              convention also expressed serious              concern over alleged non recognition of indigenous peoples              rights in working              out appropriate solutions in really mitigating climate              change and in adapting              to climate crisis. There should be moratorium on large              scale destructive              unsustainable development projects in Manipur, primarily              mega dams’              construction, oil exploration, large infrastructure              projects, which will              destroy the forest, wetlands, agriculture land etc and to              review Mapithel dam              construction.
Alternative              energies, indigenous              peoples’ traditional knowledge and practices such as              diversified agriculture;              community-based adaptation etc should be promoted in              Manipur. The upcoming              climate change negotiations in 20 COP at Lima Peru should              ensure recognition of              indigenous peoples self determined rights and development.              The emphasis              accorded on private sector financing as solution to              climate crisis in              international climate negotiations should end, it              resolved.

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